Mystery Thread

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by InLove, Aug 11, 2005.

  1. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Hi, and Peace to All Here:)

    Welcome to the "CR Cookbook".

    I named the thread what I named it because I figured that "Your Favorite Recipes" might not draw as many lookers. I hope I am forgiven:eek: (probably "eek" is not the best icon here, but I do not have a smiley with batting lashes and hearts at the moment--not even a "Martha" smiley:D. I need to go shopping...I wonder if a "Martha" smiley would come with a little band around its ankle?)

    Anyway, anyone got a recipe or two? (This is going to be a long thread--if I were a betting woman, I'd lay marbles on it--if I could find my marbles. I do have a marble cutting board, but it tends to ruin my knives....:))

    Bon Appetit...

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  2. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    A recipe or two!? I have a hello of a lot more than that! Can you set some parameters so I don't cause I, Brian to exceed his bandwidth?

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine (who is currently noshing on a piece of M_Wolverine Sloppy Joe w/Chipotle "taco bake")
     
  3. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    LOL--Phyllis! I told J.H. that I couldn't wait to hear from you--and here you are!

    InLove:)
     
  4. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    You know, I didn't think about it when I started this thread, but since food can often be a religious issue, is this "do-able" without offending or bothering one another? Does anyone think that we should limit the recipes to vegetarian? Just thinking....What do you guys think?

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  5. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    Actually, many recipes that call for meat can be made vegetarian, too (the sloppy joes w/ chipotle "taco bake" originally called for ground beef, but I made it with "fake meat". (I know. Not something a "true Texan" wants to hear, but finances and allergies are rather prohibitive on my end. :))

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
     
  6. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Hi, Peace--

    Actually, I gave up all meat except fish for a couple of years back in (oh, never mind the years:)!). Anyway, I have a bigtime struggle with with iron deficiency, and back then, the doctors suggested that I add meat back into my diet, which I did. Now we know that iron does not have to be a problem in a vegetarian diet, and I have been thinking that I could be okay with a meatless menu. But like you say, this is Texas...and we'll see...:)

    Anyway, perhaps until we have some more input on this issue (if we get more), we could wisely post recipes that would not be a problem in this area.

    Phyllis, on another thread, you mentioned kneading garlic into pizza dough? I have never been able to master pizza dough... (hint, hint)

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  7. Abogado del Diablo

    Abogado del Diablo Ferally Decent

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    My wife and I are vegetarian (though I occassionaly eat fish). I love to cook and have lots of original recipes if you are interested.

    I make some mean sweet potato enchiladas and if you still eat fish I have a great recipe for a low-fat smoked salmon chowder.
     
  8. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Oh, goody! Yes, Abogado bring them on, by all means--and by the way, if anyone has a good vegetarian tamale recipe, please submit it. I usually try and make tamales at least once a year, especially around December, but lard is the traditional ingredient that holds the masa together--and I just do not want to use it! I've tried other ways, but so far, I haven't captured the magic.:)

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  9. Abogado del Diablo

    Abogado del Diablo Ferally Decent

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    First, the Smoked Salmon Chowder:

    1 Tb. olive oil
    1 medium yellow onion, diced
    1 lb. sweet, whole kernel corn (fresh or frozen)
    4 cups vegetable stock
    1/4 lb. smoked salmon fillet, diced and skin removed (not the flat stuff!)
    2 med. carrots, sliced
    1 red bell pepper, diced
    1 lb. small red potatoes, diced
    3 celery stalks, sliced
    1 Tb. dried thyme
    1 1/2 cups skim milk
    1 tsp. black pepper
    pinch of cayenne pepper or splash of Tabasco

    In a soup pot, saute the onion and corn in the oil until onion is translucent (about 4-5 minutes on medium heat). Transfer half of the sauteed corn and onion to a blender or food processor. Add half of the stock. Puree.

    Pour the pureed blend and remaining stock back into the soup pot with the remaining corn and onion. Add fish, potatoes, celery, carrots, bell pepper, thyme and black pepper. Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer over med-low heat for 20-25 minutes, or until potatoes are tender. Add milk and cayenne. Simmer for additional 10 minutes. Serve hot with a crusty multigrain bread.
     
  10. Abogado del Diablo

    Abogado del Diablo Ferally Decent

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    The sweet potato enchiladas may be tricky because I just remembered that they don't make my secret ingredient any more (I bought out three grocery stores worth - about a ten-year supply when I found out they weren't going to sell it any more). It's a particular spice mix made with garlic, dried habanero, black pepper and a few other spices called "West Texas Dust." It's the key to making this taste right. I'm sure that you could put together an equivalent mix of spices, but I need to check the bottle to verify everything that's in it. So I'll write out that recipe later.
     
  11. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    Basic Pizza/Bread Dough

    1 pkg. active dry yeast
    2 c. lukewarm (110-115 degrees F.)
    1 t. sugar (I sometimes use honey instead)
    1 t. salt
    1 oz. oil
    @6 c. flour

    Dissolve yeast in water with sugar and salt. Add oil. Gradually add flour until all of the flour is incorporated. Knead until smooth then let proof for 15 to 20 minutes. Kead again, then divide in half. Carefully stretch the dough until it fits the pan and/or the particular sized pizza desired. Top and bake at 400 degrees until the crust is lightly golden and the cheese is melted (I go by smell, not by time in this recipe.)

    If using a pizza stone, dust the stone with cornmeal before laying the dough down (so the pizza won't stick.) You can do this to a pizza pan, too, if you desire.

    The dough freezes well, too. :) (If worse comes to worse, cheat and use frozen white bread dough. ;) I won't blab if you won't. :D)

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
     
  12. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Thanks, folks--this is great. Can't wait to try my hand at pizza dough again. Saving the Salmon Chowder for just the right time. And I think I may have seen that West Texas Dust--just can't remember if it was in my rearview mirror or on a shelf at Whole Foods (actually, I think it may have been in me dear mom's spice cabinet). :)

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  13. lunamoth

    lunamoth Episcopalian

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    I have a great recipie for sweet potato chili, vegetarian and yummy! I'll look it up and post it soon.

    I'd like to go vegetarian but I think my husband would 1) die of starvation or 2) leave me. (Just kidding!) He's actually the much more inspired cook in our family and has the patience for doing it. BK we would spend whole afternoons cooking, me primarily acting as sous chef and wine pourer. But, PK we don't have time for that and I no longer drink, so we've moved into what I call the one-pot-wonder stage of the cooking experience. I like to just use lots of fresh ingredients and minimal preparation.

    One of my favorite cookbooks is called "One Bowl."

    lunamoth
     
  14. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Hi-Peace to All--

    Well, now, those sweet potatoes seem to be the stars of the show so far--better get to the market before they are all gone!

    I've been studying the use of herbs and other natural ingredients as therapy since I was a kid--guess you could say that I was born into it. Sweet potatoes (more specifically yams, which some say are the same, but others say not) are often included in natural therapies, especially from the old herb doctors in places like the Ozarks, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

    LOL--I wonder if yams might be the magical ingredient that would hold the masa together on my tamales?

    Look forward to your recipe(s), lunamoth--thanks for posting here--seems like our paths don't cross as often anymore--I think they've been keeping you rather busy around here;). (LOL--glad you like the coffee-pot song--anything I can do to inspire:D).

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  15. lunamoth

    lunamoth Episcopalian

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    The sweet potato is indeed the queen of vegetables, and cauliflower is king. I wish I had more good recipies for cauliflower (hint hint). Black beans, while not technically a vegetable, rate pretty high in the royal family as well. Give me any combination of sweet potato, black beans, corn, bell peppers, hot peppers and rice. I could pretty much live on that but my family would abandon me.

    Black Bean and Sweet Potato Chili

    1 Tbsp canola oil (I also use olive)
    1 medium yellow onion, diced
    1 medium green bell pepper, seeded and diced
    1 cup sliced celery (optional in my book)
    2 cloves garlic, minced (mandatory!)
    1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
    2 tomatoes, cored and diced
    2 15-oz. cans black beans, drained (or soak your own)
    1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes
    1 Tbsp dried parsley (or 2 Tbsp fresh)
    2 tsp ground cumin
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 tsp salt
    2 cups unpeeled, diced sweet potato (about 1 large)

    red onion choped small and soaked in a bit of red wine vinegar for topping if you like, or shredded cheddar cheese

    Oh yeah, how to put it together. Heat oil in large pan, cook onion, pepper, celery, garlic and jalapeno for 7 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and cook 3-4 mintues. Stir in beans, crushed tomatoes, seasonings and cook for about 30 minutes over med-low heat.

    Cook sweet potatoes in boiling water about 15 min over medium heat, until tender, and drain in colander. Add for last 5 minutes of cooking to the chili.

    Adpated from: The Lean Tureen

    Oh no, I'm not being kept overly busy here. Just laying a bit lower than usual. :)

    cheers,
    lunamoth
     
  16. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Hi, luna--

    Thanks for the "receipt" (as my grannies and folks used to call them:)).

    You asked about cauliflower? My bestest girlfriend in the whole world once won a bunch of money for her cauliflower recipe--I will look that up for you, and it is a good excuse to call her (to make sure it is okay if I post it). It may take me a while, because apparently I am doing well at my new job, because they are keeping me quite busy--(yay! more money).

    Get back to ya on this---

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  17. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    Well, okay--it is about the end of summer (for those who see the seasons). So, if anyone has access to fresh basil, now will be the last harvest, depending on your location.

    So, if you have a fresh batch of basil, then it only seems right at this time to turn it into pesto. So harvest it, and chop it all up.

    Find the best extra virgin olive oil you can (Spectrum brand is great,but I know pricey--use whatever you have) and find some pine (pinion) nuts. And if you happen to have some fresh garlic, great--if not, buy some ( and not the "elephant" kind--just the humble garlic).

    Also, you need a small block of real parmasian (no time to check "speeling" I know it is not right)--not the kind you shake on pizza or spaghetti, but a real block of real smelly cheese.

    And you need some proper freezer containers--small ones, because it does not take much pesto per dish.

    Put all of this stuff in a food processor, one thing at a time, and blend and taste, blend and taste--it is heavenly....

    Oh--wait, you need lemons, too--make sure you do not get any lemon seeds into your mix, because it will be terribly bitter if you do.

    When you get it the way you like it, freeze and label it, and then use it on pasta and stuff until next August or so....

    Yum....
     
  18. juantoo3

    juantoo3 ʎʇıɹoɥʇnɐ uoıʇsǝnb

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    Awesome thread!

    I don't get to cook much, and as a bachelor I figure I'm pretty limited to begin with. Cooking for one creates its own challenges.

    I am not a strict vegetarian, but I do not eat nearly as much meat as I used to, and when I do I try to get the better cuts. I like lamb on occasion, especially for Passover.

    One quick meal I have come to like a lot came from a liking for Ramen noodles. Until I read the ingredients and realized all of the junk in them. So, the substitute I found that cooks in the same few minutes is angel hair pasta. I usually break the lengths into three shorter lengths so it is not as messy to eat. Boil it with a splash of olive oil to prevent sticking, and a pinch of sea salt to hasten boiling. A little water (just covering, about 2 cups for "two" servings of pasta) will make the noodles pretty much without water, more water makes more of a soup, both of which are good.

    From there I toss in some frozen mixed vegetables, after the pasta is cooked. Bring back just to boiling and cut off the heat, and add season to taste. I prefer garlic and cayenne, and usually a (tiny!) pinch of tumeric, all of which have medicinal properties for arthritis.

    Short, sweet, simple and tastes good. Sometimes I vary by adding a little tuna, or if I am feeling really adventurous I will drain the noodles/veggies and add alfredo sauce and warm on low so I don't scorch the sauce.

    Cheap and easy, and pretty quick. Usually done in about ten minutes. That's my bachelor solution!

    Thanks to everyone for all the great recipes!
     
  19. juantoo3

    juantoo3 ʎʇıɹoɥʇnɐ uoıʇsǝnb

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    BTW, does anyone have a recipe for barley and mushroom soup? I ate this once, and it was so good, and very filling!
     
  20. dauer

    dauer New Member

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    I like tofu hash. I don't know how to make it. But I can describe it for you:

    It tastes really really good, like regular hash, only with tofu instead of meat.

    You know, I think that's the secret to making it. Substitute tofu for meat in a good hash recipe. I may have to try that and see how it goes.

    Dauer
     

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