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Old 06-09-2008, 01:34 PM   #1 (permalink)
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ancient scribes

Ancient Scribes and the Word of Godfor those who are interested this is good reading about the word of God .
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Old 06-17-2008, 05:56 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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Ancient Scribes and the Word of Godfor those who are interested this is good reading about the word of God .
or for addition reading shared in the sumarian tablets

Sumerian Gods and Goddesses - Crystalinks

this site has quite a few various religions that can be observed

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Information about Sumerian Gods and Goddesses is found on the Sumerian King List as well as Sumerian clay tablets and cylinder seals. The Sumerian King List records all the rulers of Earth back over 400,000 years. This huge stretch of time coupled with reigns into the thousands of years has caused most historians to reject its accuracy. However all the early rulers were allegedly gods - demi-gods or immortals
That's even before the 6 thousand years of the western beliefs.

imagine that

Ellie (her site) is a little different but at least tries without being secular
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Old 06-18-2008, 09:02 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

thanks for that good and interesting .
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:31 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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thanks for that good and interesting .
...R, r.. Really?
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:47 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

Tammuz was represented by the first letter of his name, which is an ancient tau, a cross.

The "sign of the cross" was the religious symbol of Tammuz.




But what does this have to do with Christendom?


Is Tammuz worship going on there, in opposition to God?

Well, first of all, what about the "sign of the cross" in Christendom?

The cross, on which Christendom’s religions claim Christ was put to death (though it was actually a stake), is considered the foremost symbol of Christianity.

It is even bowed to and kissed by some religionists.

Among the Jews after their restoration from Babylon, the stake on which a man had been put to death was considered a detestable thing, something to be buried out of sight.

Says the Jewish authority, Moses Maimonides, of the twelfth century: "A timber upon which anyone has been hanged is buried; that the evil name may not remain with it and people should say, ‘This is the timber on which so-and-so was hanged."’ But Christendom actually honors the very thing that, according to them, was the instrument on which Jesus was tortured to death.
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:56 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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...R, r.. Really?
Well, Genesis says that Abraham was from Ur (same area as Sumer,) and moved to Palestine. He even sent his servant back there to find a wife for his son Isaac. Therefore, it wouldn't be surprising to find similarities between the Sumerian writings and those contained in Genesis.
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Old 06-18-2008, 11:00 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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Well, Genesis says that Abraham was from Ur (same area as Sumer,) and moved to Palestine. He even sent his servant back there to find a wife for his son Isaac. Therefore, it wouldn't be surprising to find similarities between the Sumerian writings and those contained in Genesis.
SG: Thanks, yeah I know what you mean...

I was just shocked that mee was interested in something which wasn't JW writings.
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Old 06-18-2008, 08:19 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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Tammuz was represented by the first letter of his name, which is an ancient tau, a cross.
No. In Babylonian, it was Dumuzi, and they did not use letters, rather, they use syllabic symbols, and the cuneiform DU does not look at all like a cross. In Aramaic or Phoenician, Tammuz starts with a teth, not a thav, and that letter looks like a coil, not a cross. Not that there is any relevance here, since the practice of abbreviating names by initial letters had not been invented at the time.
This is a Hislopism, a preservation of 19th-century pseudo-lore that the JW's hang on to although there is no basis in fact.
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Old 06-18-2008, 08:20 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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Well, Genesis says that Abraham was from Ur (same area as Sumer,)
The "Ur ha-Khashdim" which Abraham came from was on the upper Zab (Turkish Kurdistan nowadays), not the "Ur" in Sumer ("ur" was a generic root for "burg", "ville").
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:32 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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...R, r.. Really?
and your point is?
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:34 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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SG: Thanks, yeah I know what you mean...

I was just shocked that mee was interested in something which wasn't JW writings.
why?
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:41 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

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No. In Babylonian, it was Dumuzi, and they did not use letters, rather, they use syllabic symbols, and the cuneiform DU does not look at all like a cross. In Aramaic or Phoenician, Tammuz starts with a teth, not a thav, and that letter looks like a coil, not a cross. Not that there is any relevance here, since the practice of abbreviating names by initial letters had not been invented at the time.
This is a Hislopism, a preservation of 19th-century pseudo-lore that the JW's hang on to although there is no basis in fact.

What
Does the Cross Symbolize?

Long before the Christian era, crosses were used by the ancient Babylonians as symbols in their worship of the fertility god Tammuz.

The use of the cross spread into Egypt, India, Syria, and China. Then, centuries later, the Israelites adulterated their worship of Jehovah with acts of veneration to the false god Tammuz. The Bible refers to this form of worship as a ‘detestable thing.’—Ezekiel 8:13, 14.
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:55 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

"The cross in the form of the ‘Crux Ansata’ . . . was carried in the hands of the Egyptian priests and Pontiff kings as the symbol of their authority as priests of the Sun god and was called ‘the Sign of Life.’"—The Worship of the Dead (London, 1904), Colonel J. Garnier, p. 226.



"Various figures of crosses are found everywhere on Egyptian monuments and tombs, and are considered by many authorities as symbolical either of the phallus [a representation of the male sex organ] or of coition. . . . In Egyptian tombs the crux ansata [cross with a circle or handle on top] is found side by side with the phallus."—A Short History of Sex-Worship (London, 1940), H. Cutner, pp. 16, 17; see also The Non-Christian Cross, p. 183.
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Old 06-19-2008, 01:18 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

Gee, did Jesus blow his nose on a Kleenex? No say Jehovah's Witnesses, it was a Puffs.

Chris
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Old 06-19-2008, 08:58 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: ancient scribes

So back to ancient scribes

THE DIVINE NAME KNOWN AND USED




In his wisdom, Jehovah has seen to it that his Word, the Bible, has been preserved until modern times.


The diligent work of scribes throughout the ages has been involved in its preservation.


The most meticulous of these were the Masoretes, professional Hebrew scribes who worked from the sixth to the tenth century C.E.



Ancient Hebrew was written without vowels.

Over time, this increased the danger of losing the proper pronunciation as Aramaic replaced Hebrew.

The Masoretes developed a system of vowel points to add to the Bible text in order to indicate the correct pronunciation of Hebrew words.


Significantly, the Masoretic vowel points in the Leningrad Codex allow for the pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton—the four Hebrew consonants making up the divine name—as Yehwah’, Yehwih’, and Yeho·wah’. "Jehovah" is now the most widely known pronunciation of the name.


The divine name was a living, familiar term to Bible writers and others of ancient times.


Today, God’s name is known and used by millions who acknowledge that ‘Jehovah alone is the Most High over all the earth.’—Psalm 83:18.

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