Art of War - Sun Tzu

Discussion in 'Tao' started by Avi, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. Avi

    Avi Interfaith Forums

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    There are five dangerous faults which may affect a general:

    1) Recklessness, which leads to destruction;
    2) cowardice, which leads to capture;
    3) a hasty temper, which can be provoked by insults;
    4) a delicacy of honor which is sensitive to shame;
    5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.

    Any thoughts ??
     
  2. citizenzen

    citizenzen Custom User Title

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    6) An idiot of a president?*










    *I mean the last one... not this one... though I'm not all happy with this one as it is.
     
  3. DrumR

    DrumR New Member

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    One might add "Arrogance" but then it is part of the sub-set of recklessness.
    Nbr4 and Nbr3 work very well together indeed.
    Nbr1 and the inverse of Nbr5 are all too often a co-operating pair as well.
    Nbr5 may be used to re-enforce Nbr2 -which may lead to further in-securities.

    There are some parallels to be found in the Tao teh Ching.
     
  4. nativeastral

    nativeastral fluffy future

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    6] under solicitude of his men, which leads to possible mutiny:eek:
     
  5. Tao_Equus

    Tao_Equus Interfaith Forums

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    (6) Hereditary biases which lead to inbred imbeciles commanding good men.
     
  6. Avi

    Avi Interfaith Forums

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  7. Qi1

    Qi1 New Member

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    These are good measures of a mans nature. These character traits go well beyond a good general and apply to all facets of leadership:


    One can substitute his / her daily interactions for the examples given to see how the analogy applies.
    There are many good examples of more contemporary application:
    And even more recent examples as well:
    Are these lessons better applied to war or general cases of life ?
     
  8. Qi1

    Qi1 New Member

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    These character traits are good examples of leadership beyond war time. They relate to judgement of the individual and involve psychological constructs:

    There are also examples of more contemporary application of these principles. They apply to a variety of more recent military operations in the European and western theaters.

    So can we say that these principles are better applied to military applications or more general life situations ? Please give examples of why you believe your view. (Push and breathe deeply in Tai Chi movements !!). Any Feng Shui practioners ?

     
  9. Eclectic Mystic

    Eclectic Mystic Member

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    This one thread seems to have pinched all sorts of different sensitive spots amongst different people.
     
  10. NiceCupOfTea

    NiceCupOfTea Pathetic earthlings

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    was Sun Tzu a Taoist ?

    I thought not, but what do I know ?
     
  11. Avi

    Avi Interfaith Forums

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    Wiki says:


    Returning to the topic of leadership, here is a very interesting passage from the same wiki on Sun Tzu:

    Now that is real leadership, to be able to out manuever his boss, everyone agree ?
     
  12. DrumR

    DrumR New Member

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    Greetings Qi1.
    The 'Art of War' is a book of strategy applicable for all conflicts and potential conflicts. The battlefield and weaponry may, at first glance, appear different yet this would include diplomatic, business, and interpersonal relationships/negotiations. However the unwritten concepts, as found in the I Ching and Tao teh Ching, need also be factored into the complete whole.

    Placing the enemy on unfamiliar ground, during a negotiation, may be as simple as a small amount of warm water on the seat of the chair for the 'enemy' to sit at at the negotiation table. Initially the warm water is not particularly noticed at seating but, as time wears on, the 'enemy' becomes aware of the small discomfort experienced and may become distracted from certain details. This may result in the loss of a, seemingly, small bargaining chip presently, but that small advantage has been gained for the long term.

    Ambush techniques, by the simple act of agreeing with the 'enemy,' have often placed an opponent off guard in that one may subtly elicit from them an agreement on that which was was otherwise "out of the question."
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2010

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