Enemies can cloak their identities

Discussion in 'Site News' started by bhaktajan, Oct 25, 2010.

  1. bhaktajan

    bhaktajan Active Member

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    Enemies can cloak their identities and hide their attacks amid the cascade of data flowing across international computer networks, it warns.

    Relentless attackers are trying to hack into home and office networks in the U.S. "millions of times a day, 24/7."

    And operating in cyberspace "may require abandoning common assumptions concerning time and space" because attacks can come from anywhere and take only seconds.

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  2. bhaktajan

    bhaktajan Active Member

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  3. Dharmaatmaa

    Dharmaatmaa New Member

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    >Enemies can cloak their identities and hide their attacks amid the cascade of data
    >...because attacks can come from anywhere and take only seconds.

    Who are the enemies, bhaktajan? And what they're going to attack?
    I do not see any enemies... ;)
     
  4. bhaktajan

    bhaktajan Active Member

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    Yall wantz t'stay current. No? Keep up with the times? No?
    Yes, that would be best. You can ONLY FEAR the KNOWN.
    Surely, one does not fear what is not known to exist. Agreed?



    UK identifies al-Qaida offshoot as key new threat - Yahoo! News

    LONDON – Britain's top law enforcement official warned Wednesday that al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula has attempted attacks inside the U.K. and is posing an escalating threat in the wake of the attempted Yemen mail bomb strikes.
    Home Secretary Theresa May said a suspect tied to the was arrested in Britain this year over a plot by the group to carry out an attack on the U.K.
    She said al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula "now has a very substantial operational capability in Yemen," citing a suicide bomb attack on the British ambassador to Yemen in April and a against a diplomatic convoy last month.
    "But they have also shown the ability to project a threat far beyond the borders of Yemen," May told an audience of security officials, adding that police have been working to disrupt them.
    She claimed that if the mail bomb uncovered last week had exploded aboard a passenger jet, it could have caused deaths on the scale of the 1988 terror attack on Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, which killed 259 people on board and 11 on the ground.
    May said the capability of al-Qaida's core leadership was in decline, but threats from Yemen and Somalia were becoming increasingly serious.
    "Action by our counterparts in Pakistan, by our allies in the U.S., by our own coalition forces in Afghanistan and of course by agencies here and elsewhere have all made al-Qaida weaker than at any time since 9/11," she said.
    However, she said Britain believed that Yemen mail bombs plot had been hatched by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, and acknowledged it involved sophisticated bomb-making.
    "The explosive device was deeply concealed in the cartridge of a printer and connected to a hidden power source in sections of a mobile telephone," May said, speaking to London's military think tank, the Royal United Services Institute.
    "The specifics of this attack — notably the type of device and how it was concealed — were new to us," she added.
    Assistant police commissioner John Yates, head of counterterrorism for London's Metropolitan Police, said the mail bomb plot illustrated the changing nature of the terrorism threat.
    May said it was becoming easier for small numbers of terrorists to harness technology and attempt to carry out major attacks.
    She also said that she remained concerned at the flow of people traveling to train and fight in Somalia from Britain. Left unchecked, those allied with the al-Shabaab group would likely return and seek "to commit mass murder on the streets of London."
    Officials said the al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula suspect arrested in Britain was being held in prison and awaiting trial next year on terrorism offenses related to the planning of suicide bombings.
     
  5. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Staff Member

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    Yep - terrorists do it with bombs.

    Israeli intelligence allegedly does it with computer viruses.

    Who'se the big force behind cyber warfare again? :)
     
  6. bhaktajan

    bhaktajan Active Member

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    RE: Post #5:

    Terrorist versus Police


    Post #5 asserts a specious comparision that does not apply similar comparison ---it asserts:

    One does their obligated/necessary "work".
    and,
    The other whimsically propagates "chaos"

    Ergo, this is not a valid comparision.

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    Another similar example would be:

    The criminal is agressive with a knife
    and,
    The Police do their obligated/necessary "work".

    Ergo, this is not a valid comparision.
     

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