Idealism

Discussion in 'Belief and Spirituality' started by Lunitik, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. donnann

    donnann Well-Known Member

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    How do you know they were not incarnated beings sent from the heavenly kingdom?
     
  2. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    Donnan, it is just a matter of half-full versus half-empty. Of positive thoughts or negative thoughts.

    Stay peaceful, little brother
     
  3. Dream

    Dream Well-Known Member

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    In the USA it is difficult to live without an internal combustion vehicle. Toyota sells quality pickup trucks. They sell me a truck, so then I receive from them a durable good. That makes me dependent upon them, because I don't know how to make pickup trucks. Therefore Toyota is doing me harm. They should be teaching me how to make my own truck. Is that right?

    Now I send rice to Africa, because I hear someone is starving. Therefore I am doing them harm, because I should be teaching them to make rice instead. Same idea?
     
  4. Lunitik

    Lunitik Interfaith Forums

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    How do I know something ridiculous isn't true? Well, because I have experienced their true station... I can see with each where their enlightenment has happened, and their practices are no different to others walking the same path. Jesus has achieved in the desert, for instance, while fasting. The is quite like Buddha's enlightenment, although it doesn't directly say because it goes against the whole faith - if Jesus has learned, you can reach him, but the whole power structure of the faith depends on his station being impossible to reach.
     
  5. Lunitik

    Lunitik Interfaith Forums

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    Certainly.
     
  6. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    Donnann, I believe your analogy quite appropriate. What we experience is the key. And thise experiences are not universal, which is why the Divine has incorporated in so many forms, so many times.

    Peace, brother... radarmark
     
  7. Lunitik

    Lunitik Interfaith Forums

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    Every single person can experience the divine, we have simply clung to a few that have reached. These men have talked about their own experience, and so they seem different but they are not at all. If you ignore terminology or at least correlate, you can see they are all discussing exactly the same thing. What they point to is always the same, but these men are individuals so their expression is different.

    Find your own expression instead of trying to emulate another.
     
  8. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    Ah, but is not that what this existence is all about? It seems as if you also speak from your own expression.

    Circles within cirles and wheels within wheels....

    Pax et amore vincunt omnia... radarmark
     
  9. Lunitik

    Lunitik Interfaith Forums

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    Certainly, it is exactly what it is about, finding our own way to divinity... walking the path of another is not going to help at all, though. It simply isn't natural to cling to another persons experience, you remove your own uniqueness and nature loves uniqueness.
     
  10. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    I thnik we are using "idealism" in two quite different ways here. I am thinking of idealiam as a opposite-but-complementary philosophical school to materialism. I believe you are thinking of idealism as that motivating "pie in the sky idealists".

    While I reject idealism (I believe there is more in the universe than just one big consciousness) and materialism (ther is likewise more to the universe than my own consciousness being the aftermath of the Habanero salsa and chips I had last night), I find the second sense of idealism quite wonderful. Better to be an idealist than a pessimist, better to believe in something (say the natural rights of each individual) than nothing, better to naively believe that I can accomplish something (be it loving my kitty better than anyone ever loved her or helping to end the Neocon nazism of the Bush-II years).

    You can call me a "cock-eyed idealist" I guess.

    Pax et amore vincunt omnia... radarmark
     

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