What is the major question for you in terms of Tao?

Discussion in 'Tao' started by sunwukong, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. sunwukong

    sunwukong New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am a Chinese, and my English is not so good. But I will try my best to address what I know about the Tao.

    Let us discuss together here. (I have studied and practised Tao for almost 20 years)
     
  2. Lunitik

    Lunitik Interfaith Forums

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    2,611
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have nothing to ask, but bless you.
     
  3. sunwukong

    sunwukong New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you :)
     
  4. Vivandall

    Vivandall New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2015
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    What do you mean by wil?
     
  5. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Messages:
    21,270
    Likes Received:
    1,689
    this is wonderful, namaste and welcome...

    What would you tell someone that knows nothing about the Tao as to why you've studied/practiced for 20 years?

    And what first got you interested?
     
  6. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    552
    You do realise this post is 4 years old?
     
  7. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Messages:
    21,270
    Likes Received:
    1,689
    I didn't...

    Dang...
     
    A Cup Of Tea likes this.
  8. Vajradhara

    Vajradhara One of Many

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2003
    Messages:
    3,786
    Likes Received:
    43
    rise of the Necrothread!
     
    StevePame likes this.
  9. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,374
    Likes Received:
    166
    你好! What does it mean to practice Tao?
     
  10. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,374
    Likes Received:
    166
    We can still discuss it!
     
  11. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    552
    But who shall we ask?
     
  12. Craz

    Craz Active Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    72
    Lao-Tze says: Tao is one. It was in the beginning. It will remain for ever. It is Impersonal, eternal, immutable, omnipresent, bodiless, immaterial. It cannot be perceived by the senses. It is nameless. It is indescribable.
    ( http://sivanandaonline.org/public_html/?cmd=displaysection&section_id=1663 )

    So Lao-Tzu says it is nameless, yet calls it Tao....is that Zenish?
     
  13. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    3,807
    Likes Received:
    61
    Giving a name to the nameless is tricky. Lao-Tzu needs to call 'It' something, so he gives It the name Tao. But technically the name Tao doesn't refer to It, Tao translates as 'way' or 'path'. So when Lao-Tzu says 'Tao', he is referring to the path we travel to get to It, not to 'It' itself.

    On this point, Tao and Judaism totally agree. 'It' is nameless and indescribable. We can also see these concepts in other major religions.

    Yes, there is some similarity to Zen, because Zen only focuses on the journey along the path, not to what is at the end of the path.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2015
    Craz likes this.
  14. Craz

    Craz Active Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    72
    It was reading stories of the Baal Shem Tov that intrigued and made look elsewhere (ie not just in Judaic literature) that led me to the Tao Te Ching and other writings. I found this nameless name referred to in other religions.
     
  15. Devils' Advocate

    Devils' Advocate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,086
    Likes Received:
    378
    Am I correct in stating that Taoism is a religion without gods?
     
  16. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    3,807
    Likes Received:
    61
    "Am I correct in stating that Taoism is a religion without gods? "

    --> That is how I see it.
     
  17. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    552
    Hard to pin down it appears:
    http://www.interfaith.org/community/threads/11355/
    My guess is that a lot of the texts are only interested in how to approach life and not about the metaphysical aspects. So much is left to the reader.
     
  18. Elfiet

    Elfiet Comme je fus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    20
    As a junior in learning arts of Tai Chi/QiGong, I submit my rambling thoughts -

    Extracted from the link in previous post above:
    "Humanity follows earth, earth follows heaven, heaven follows the Way, the Way follows Nature." In the final sense, therefore, Taoism, or Wayfaring, refers to the pursuit of natural laws.

    These natural laws are reflected in the body (earth), the mind (heaven), and in the order of the universe (the Way of Nature). The practice of Taoism, therefore, takes place in the cultivation and refinement of the natural capacities of the human body-mind continuum and its relationship with the social milieu and the natural world.

    From my own interpretation of various readings and practice:
    We are located between heaven and earth. It is our duty to pay respect to all above and below. Through the cultivation of Chi we ground ourselves drawing energy through connection with earth and we can exchange our energy through our breath with the universe.

    The mind is master of the body and the body should be servant of the mind. Tai Chi/QiGong is a practice to strengthen this relationship.
    (Tai=Mind, Chi=Energy, Life force)

    The practice of QiGong is described as 'cultivating' or 'working' your Qi (Qi = life force / energy). As quoted form nqa.org, "One of the more important long-term effects is that Qigong reestablishes the body/mind/soul connection."

    The principles of yielding, softness, centeredness, balance, rootedness can be seen as elements of Taoist philosophy that Tai Chi has drawn upon. Tai Chi also has a systematic approach to the four directions, animal movements, connections with the elements.... etc....

    Now for the question: is Taoist a religion without gods? My answer would be : "indirectly no" . When we focus so much on the earth, the four directions, the natural elements, the universe..... The practice of Tai Chi/QiGong has become for me the Tao in connecting with our higher selves and with a higher power. I admit my (Catholic) bias - - that higher power can only be the Divine Himself. (repeat: QiGong reestablishes the body/mind/soul connection) Our soul is a gift from ________ .

    Please take all that I wrote lightly.... it is just a view point from someone who often sits in the back row of a church.
     
  19. Elfiet

    Elfiet Comme je fus

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2015
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    20
    Just to add - my favorite quote from Lao Tzu:

    Knowing others is wisdom,
    knowing yourself is Enlightenment.
     
    StevePame likes this.

Share This Page