Will Religion Ever Be Able to Excise Extremist Fundamentalists?

Thomas

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Or is fundamental extremism always going to be a part of religions.
I tend to think of it as a part of human nature, not religion, per se.

I think there is a too-easy tendency to blame institutions, as a means of not confronting ourselves.
 

Aerist

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I hope (and think, based on history) the radical guys will slowly get less radical.

There is a possibility that the Karma of the location/astrology/history (however we might choose to explain it) has a part to play in this. I present some evidence to support this perspective below.

By this means, Immigrants and their families from Asia and the Middle East will gradually adopt more westernised forms of their religion which fits more closely the "atmosphere", an Anglican Umma, a Western Buddhist order, a reform Judaism, just as happened with Christianity when it left its homeland some time ago.

Similarly, there are many western citizens who have gone off-the-rails from our perspective as soon as they move to one of the hot-spots in the world. OK, I appreciate one would have to be up for it to want to go to one of these places, but once there, immersed in the savagery, it is easier to fall under those influences.

Maybe "radical" is a western point of view. From the point of view of the "radical", they may be traditionalists reacting against what they might see as assimilation by the secular west.
 

Aerist

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i tend to think of it as a part of human nature, not religion, per se.

I think there is a too-easy tendency to blame institutions, as a means of not confronting ourselves.

+1 ...........................
 

wil

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a figment of your imagination
I hope (and think, based on history) the radical guys will slowly get less radical. Of course there will always be a group considered the most radical of whomever is left, just as getting rid of the shortest person in a group just creates a new shortest person.

I consider fundamentalists of all religions as having far more in common with other fundamentalists of different religions that they do with their own religion. They're basically all saying, "I'm right and you;re wrong, and I will do anything at all to prove that fact to you." Fundamentalism is a danger for all religions.

I tend to think of it as a part of human nature, not religion, per se.

I think there is a too-easy tendency to blame institutions, as a means of not confronting ourselves.


Where do you see blaming of institutions? or Religion?

I think you are saying the same thing.

He (I believe) is saying people misuse religion.

It is like that saying here in the states by the gun toters....guns don't kill people, people kill people. (they use gun) religions don't kill people, people kill people (they use religion)


Westboro Baptist Church here in the US, uses the same scripture we do. The KKK uses the same scriptures we do...

They isolate the phrases that work for them, and distort others, and incite folks...

It is human nature....but religion is providing the tool, be it Torah, Bible or Quran
 

Senthil

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Maybe "radical" is a western point of view. From the point of view of the "radical", they may be traditionalists reacting against what they might see as assimilation by the secular west.

I think it's just the current word in vogue. For me it means willing to take up arms, or willing to break the law ... something like that. It's just a word and has many meanings. For sure it sometimes means how "I'm right, you're wrong,". There was a long essay entitle radical universalism a few years back by Hindu scholar Vamadeva Shastri (David Frawley) that surely meant this.
 

Senthil

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Where do you see blaming of institutions? or Religion?

Personally, I blame individuals. The people who leave their countries to join ISIS for battle are themselves to blame. The individuals joined Westboro Baptist (and not very many).

Select people do select parts of religion that support those extreme views, yes.
 
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