Can you believe in reincarnation & still be a monotheist?

Discussion in 'Abrahamic Religions' started by Amica2, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Namaste Jesus

    Namaste Jesus Praise the Lord and Enjoy the Chai

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    Not exactly. Just saying, if the soul continues on once the body perishes and assuming a soul could reincarnate as a fish, being caught and eaten would not effect the soul. It would just move on to the next existence.
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    OK. I find a lot wrong with karma. I'm just repeating what the doctrine actually says.

    You tell me, I do not recognise your G!d.
     
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  3. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Fish, fishermen ... it's all karma. It's all explained away by the idea that the cosmos is essentially a just and perfect place, and will bring everything to perfection, and in the meantime anything that happens, be it victim or oppressor, they are just the instruments of karma towards this end.

    Nick, above, says: 'My concept of religion is all about taking responsibility for what we do' — I don't know a religion that doesn't, but karma can very quickly become a means of explaining away that responsibility. More — and worse — it gives rise to the idea that the victim has brought his/her suffering on him/herself, and is simply balancing the scales, that their suffering is their own existential fault ...
     
  4. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    that is what is known as metaphysical malpractice.

    It is also similar to the common comment that without.religion we'd live in an amoral society...when the fact is if.you need.religion or.laws to keep you in check...you (not you) are the amoral type that religions and laws were made.for
     
  5. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

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    Ooooooh, I like this one! Can't wait for his reply!
     
  6. Bhaktajan II

    Bhaktajan II Active Member

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    And what about atrophy? Floods? Tornadoes? Earthquakes? Meteors? Still-births? Lightening strikes? etc
     
  7. Bhaktajan II

    Bhaktajan II Active Member

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    How [or where] is this definition derived?

    Karma = for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

    Karma is not destiny.

    Karma translates as "Action".

    "destiny can very quickly become a means of explaining away that *responsibility."

    *Respond. Responsibility for one's actions, lest our actions [later] respond in an undesirable way.
     
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  8. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Well you may say so, I'd like to see where and why ... but the fact remains:

    Indeed, Fillmore's Metaphysical Bible Dictionary (sic) says:
     
  9. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    What about them?
     
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  10. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    From ample evidence. See citations above.

    OK.

    OK. But it determines possibility, surely?

    OK

    My issue then is, how is the moral value of the intention, which is prior to and not actually inherent in the action, determined?

    For example:
    A man gives alms to the poor, to alleviate the suffering of the poor. This is perceived as 'good' in Christian moral teaching.
    A man gives alms to the poor, solely to boost the esteem in which he is held by his neighbours, he cares nothing for the poor. This is perceived as 'bad'.

    The act, the giving of alms, is the same and has the same cause-and-effect outcome.

    I can't see by what means Buddhism regards the cosmos as capable of determining and passing judgement on an intention.
     
  11. Bhaktajan II

    Bhaktajan II Active Member

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    To pass judgement [is a super-imposition of one's own false-ego] on an intention.

    The Gita advises that personal assumption of one's acts/fruitive gains inflate one's false-ego ---that actions are not really owned by the soul.
    Do acts without ownership but with stewardship.

    The intention [and/or inattention] is mentioned in the Bhagavad-gita:
    Charity given:
    Per duty; w/o expecting return; at proper time & place to a worthy person = mode of goodness Bg17.20
    For fruitive results, and in a grudging mood = mode of passion Bg 17.21
    At an impure place; at an improper time; to unworthy persons; w/o prper attention & respect = mode of ignorance Bg 17.22

    The material elements are in flux by the three modes: Sattvam, Rajah, Tamah.
    Goodness, passion, ignorance.

    It is not just opposites ---there are diametrical poles too.
     
  12. Bhaktajan II

    Bhaktajan II Active Member

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    The threefold miseries
    [1 adhyātmika, 2 adhibhautika, and 3 adhidaivika.]

    1 miseries caused by the mind and body. Sometimes the living entity suffers bodily, and sometimes he is distressed mentally.
    Both are adhyātmika miseries. We experience these miseries even in the womb of our mother.
    As we well know, there are many types of miseries that take advantage of the delicate human body and give us pain.

    2 Miseries inflicted by other living entities. These living entities need not even be large, for there are many—such as bugs—that
    can make us miserable even while we are sleeping in bed. There are many insignificant living entities,
    like cockroaches, that sometimes give us pain, and there are also other living entities who are born
    on different kinds of planets and who give us miseries.

    3 Natural disasters that originate with the demigods of the higher planets. For instance, we sometimes suffer from severe
    cold or hot weather, from a thunderbolt, or from earthquakes, tornadoes, droughts and many natural disasters.
    In any case, we are always suffering from either one or a combination of these three kinds of miseries.
     
  13. Bhaktajan II

    Bhaktajan II Active Member

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    Advise given to the warrior:

    The Vedas mainly deal with the subject of the three modes of material nature. Rise above these modes, O Arjuna. Be transcendental to all of them. Be free from all dualities and from all anxieties for gain and safety, and be established in the Self.

    You have a right to perform your prescribed duty, but you are not entitled to the fruits of action. Never consider yourself to be the cause of the results of your activities, and never be attached to not doing your duty.

    Be steadfast in yoga, O Arjuna. Perform your duty and abandon all attachment to success or failure. Such evenness of mind is called yoga. Bg 2.48
    PURPORT
    There are three considerations here: prescribed duties, capricious work, and inaction. Prescribed duties refer to activities performed while one is in the modes of material nature. Capricious work means actions without the sanction of authority, and inaction means not performing one's prescribed duties. The Lord advised that Arjuna not be inactive, but that he perform his prescribed duty without being attached to the result. One who is attached to the result of his work is also the cause of the action. Thus he is the enjoyer or sufferer of the result of such actions.
    As far as prescribed duties are concerned, they can be fitted into three subdivisions, namely routine work, emergency work and desired activities. Routine work, in terms of the scriptural injunctions, is done without desire for results. As one has to do it, obligatory work is action in the mode of goodness. Work with results becomes the cause of bondage; therefore such work is not auspicious. Everyone has his proprietory right in regard to prescribed duties, but should act without attachment to the result; such disinterested obligatory duties doubtlessly lead one to the path of liberation.
    Arjuna was therefore advised by the Lord to fight as a matter of duty without attachment to the result. His nonparticipation in the battle is another side of attachment. Such attachment never leads one to the path of salvation. Any attachment, positive or negative, is cause for bondage. Inaction is sinful. Therefore, fighting as a matter of duty was the only auspicious path of salvation for Arjuna.
     

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