Tackling Violence Committed in the Name of Religion

Discussion in 'Belief and Spirituality' started by Thomas, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    It is.definitely. involved... As is greed, oil, land.
     
  2. HakimPtsid

    HakimPtsid Member

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    When you say "religious violence", you've got to stand back and look at what is actually fueling the violence. It's easy to pin it on a religion as a whole, rather than a specific ideology (political or religious, usually in opposition to religious norms) and the way an ideology spreads.
     
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  3. HakimPtsid

    HakimPtsid Member

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    I think it's (religion) definitely used as a political tool (so is "religious discrimination", not that it's some non-existent thing)
     
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  4. OrtaYol

    OrtaYol Member

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    If I see someone being hurt unfairly I believe it is my religious obligation to help them, this may require me to use violence. I understand that he may have had more specific cases in mind with this speech.. but then he should be more specific, especially when your words hold such weight to so many.
     
  5. DustyFeet

    DustyFeet New Member

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    Hi OrtaYol, i'm new here. Forgive me for joining this discussion late?

    Without going into specifics, i feel like i share your concerns and your noble intentions. Regarding your comment about "Abrahamic religions" above, i think i know what u are referring to, and i struggle on my own with this. I am jewish, born jewish, and my understanding is, i will always be jewish regardless of what i do or what i believe. Further, my understanding is that i belong to the Torah just as much as the Torah belongs to me, and there's nothing i can do to change that. And that is relevant to this discussion because: i recognise the parts in the Torah that ,if i accept them literally, will lead me to condone a machevellian approach when i see someone being bullied and abused. And i struggle with this. Because: there's something inside me that rejects these battlefield tactics. And i don't know why. Lately i have started to wonder? "Does the Torah sometimes use negative role modeling to teach? And how do i tell when i should accept the words at face value; when should i read it literally? And when should i do the opposite? and listen to my internal moral sensetivities?" i am still trying to figure this out. I guess i am echoing a previous comment in this thread that speaks of caution towards a "black and white" approach. I find myself falling into this mindset in times of high-stress and high-emotion. And i'm trying to find new ways to counter this seemingly automatic response. Just sharing... Thank u for the facinating discussion, your participation, and everything u do.

    With much love and great respect,

    -DF-
     
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