Star date 3019

Discussion in 'Politics and Society' started by wil, Jun 3, 2019.

  1. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Star date 3019...I wonder the percentage of the population that adheres to any religion as we know it today...

    What would the discussions on I/O be?
     
  2. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    The Book of Amos is generally agreed to be the oldest book in the Bible, written between 788BC and 747BC. So the Bible is nearly 3000 years old.

    Lao Tzu was born in 601BC, but the I Ching from which he drew, was already old by then: it first a appeared in the Zhou Dynasty between 1000BC and 750BC.

    The Mahabarata war took place in 3137BC. The Vedic age began in 1500BC. Buddha was born in 621BC.

    Zoroastrianism is thought to be 4000 years old.

    Mohammed (peace be upon him) was born 571AD.

    Another 1000 years probably won't make much difference? The texts will still be the same.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  3. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    The Jewish bible was assembled and completed.around 2k ago.right? The christian bible not till 300? Its a stretch to say the bible is older than Jesus.

    But that is not what I question

    https://www.google.com/search?q=per...d-metropcs-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

    https://www.google.com/search?q=rel...d-metropcs-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8
     
  4. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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  5. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    That is the past, what is the future is the question I ponder, links should provide fodder
     
  6. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    Perhaps people turn to religion, or back to it, when life gets hard, uncertain -- whatever the word is? So the prevalent atheism seems to be mostly based in the wealthy first world urban world, amongst a population that has not really experienced war or deprivation?

    But the first world urban standard of living doesn't have to stay so good? A lot can and does happen in 1000 yrs?

    I'll check the links out properly later
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
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  7. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    Humanity didn't change much back then. The changes in another thousand years will be astounding.
     
  8. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    But perhaps not all good? We may be back to the bronze age in 1000 yrs, lol?
     
  9. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    The expansion of both Islam and Christianity seems to rely not on atheists or pagans gravitating toward religion but A...maintenance thru families growing children in the religion, and missionaries traveling to new lands and conquering territory or heavy duty door knocking. In the US Mormons, Baptists abs JWs are still pretty heavy at that whereas the old tent revivalists have gone electronic thru TV and internet. In that video graphic you can watch religion go along with wars and or colonization...
     
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  10. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    So knocking on doors, conquering territories, and family ties. That's how religion primarily spreads? Seems rather superficial then. Thanks for your analysis . . .
     
  11. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Am I wrong?
     
  12. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    I think so. Look at ancient Christianity.

    Imagine you're there. Plague hits. Pagans flee and hardcore Christians stay to tend to the needs of the sick. Surely such praiseworthy acts would attract you to Christianity? In other words good deeds attract converts? Or am I wrong?
     
  13. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Links to this history? You will have to educate me, I know of no pagans fleeing plague (which way do you run) nor of Christians not fleeing.
     
  14. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    Here are the results from a quick search:
     
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  15. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    It's enough to unsettle anyone's worldview/QUOTE] well almost anyone
     
  16. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    A contemporary example is Carlo Urbani. A devout Catholic, he was a doctor who joined Mani Tese (an Italian Catholic NGO) specialising in the field of epidemic medicine. Became a consultant to the World Health Organization and joined Médecins Sans Frontières.

    In February 2003 Urbani was on holiday in the Far East. His 'holidays' involved packing a bag full of medicines and visiting out-of-the-way places. At a WHO request, he popped across to the French Hospital in Hanoi, to look at a patient, Johnny Chen, an American businessman was thought to have influenza. Urbani realised Chen's illness was new and highly contagious. He named it SARS. He immediately notified the WHO (triggering the most effective response to a major epidemic in history — the disease originated in China but they had kept the problem secret, which meant it had spread by the time it came to public attention and the WHO had to track down those who'd been in the region and then travelled abroad). He persuaded the Vietnamese authorities to isolate patients and screen travellers (slowing the early pace of the epidemic spread).

    In March, flying to a conference in Bangkok, he felt ill on the plane. He did his best to isolate himself and was met by a colleague who called an ambulance. They sat eight feet apart until an ambulance arrived 90 minutes later, because its attendants stopped for protective gear first.

    Urbani had contracted SARS, the disease he had identified. He died 18 days later. Still today there is no known cure nor effective treatment. It is recognised that the epidemic could have been far, far worse (an extinction event?) had Urbani not happened to be close by, a world expert in the field, to identify a new disease and initiate immediate and drastic treatment (his clout because of his reputation).

    His wife visited him an one one occasion said it wasn't responsible behaviour for the father of three children to risk his life treating sick patients. Urbani replied: "If I can't work in such situations, what am I here for? Answering e-mails, going to cocktail parties and pushing paper?"

    Mother Teresa of Calcutta is another example ...
     
  17. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    New Scientist seems to think religion'll be around when science has run its mile.
     
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  18. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Me thinks wed find similar stories amongst Muslims, Hindus and pagans
     
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  19. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Oh, quite.
     
  20. Cino

    Cino Big Love

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    The term "religion" is quite flexible, though, and can cover as much or as little as fits the need of the argument.

    When I recall how often I've heard the argument if "atheists are religious / science is religion", I'm inclined to say the New Scientist got it wrong :)

    Is charity the hallmark of religion, or even of a certain one? And, does it work the other way around, do we always have to look for a religious motivation for charity? Can't a person be charitable for entirely un-selfish (with respect to personal salvation) reasons?

    (I get it that we're discussing religion in a more narrow sense here.)
     

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