freedom 1960s-1970s

Discussion in 'Belief and Spirituality' started by KnowSelf, Oct 3, 2019.

  1. KnowSelf

    KnowSelf Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2019
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    20
    Growing up as a preachers kid during the 1960s-1970s there was much to do about freedom, the Civil Rights Movement and the Viet-Nam Anti-war Movement. The music was phenomenal as it spoke of unity and freedom from the oppression of authority.

    Although I did not experience true freedom until three decades latter I recognize true freedom as the ability to choose what I say and believe in without hesitation or remorse. Freedom is security and confidence in one's self and all I do. Freedom is living present tense 24/7.
     
  2. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Messages:
    20,372
    Likes Received:
    1,237
    The music of the 60s n 70s still speaks to me, strums my heart strings, makes everything... groovy!

    Can't I live in the NOW with the music from yesterday... Its not so far away...
     
  3. KnowSelf

    KnowSelf Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2019
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    20
    There is a difference between living in the NOW and preferred musical taste. Living in the now is primary regard for the present without concern or worry of past and future events. The now is living at the upmost possibilities of the present tense of understanding and being.
     
  4. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic)

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    276
    I'm a bit younger. The music of my youth was more angry in its opposition to authoritarian administrations. The aesthetics were more edgy, too. Counterculture develops and lives! Nowadays my child's generation have discovered and developed new aesthetics, which don't speak to me as much, but the breath of freedom and the angry struggle against oppression is unmistakably there. After a couple of beers, I can even begin to enjoy it sometimes.

    As it is, my generation is caught between the endless riffs of 70's stoner music and the neverending bass lines of today...
     
    A Cup Of Tea likes this.

Share This Page