The Sayings Of The Tantric Mystic Master Yashua The Nazarene

Discussion in 'Belief and Spirituality' started by RJM Corbet, May 3, 2021.

  1. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens Admin

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    Any thoughts?

    The Sayings Of The Tantric Mystic Master Yashua The Nazarene
    by Andrew Blundell


    Getting closer to the mystical teachings of Yahshua the Nazarene from before the emergence of syncretic Christianity

    Many people believe that the history of early Christianity was different from the mythical story told in Acts in the New Testament. Some think it started with a community using gnostic gospels such as the gospel of Thomas, others think it started with Hellenized Jews who merged their Jewish beliefs with Greek ideologies and yet others believe it started with the original mission and teachings of a historical Yahshua as expressed in the hypothetical collection of sayings in Q (Q-lite).

    My own interpretation of the original teachings of Yahshua is a tantric-mystic one. I believe these sayings were used inside a short-lasting tantric-mystic mission that aimed to teach its members how to struggle actively, so in a tantric way, for mystic union or enlightenment (realising the “Rule of God” or “Holy Spirit”) by following the teachings of and associating with their realised spiritual Master Yahshua Ha-Notsri.

    After the original mission had split up into a number of different syncretic sub-missions, the original teachings seem to have lost their importance and the sayings were no longer seen as in need of being preserved in their original context and form. As the teachings got diluted with and were partly replaced by newer, more Christian ideas, their tantric-mystic and universal relevance and power were greatly diminished.

    By peeling away the later Christian editing, the sayings of Yahshua can be retrieved more or less in their original form and context thereby revealing the deeper tantric-mystic dimension of the teachings. As the ‘Sitz im Leben’ of the sayings was changed from the one of their original use into the one associated with their function in the narrative gospels, the authors of these gospels may have so much disturbed certain sayings, that reconstructing their exact original wording has become difficult.

    I made use of a word-to-word Greek to English translation tool and made use of the reconstructed scholarly text as found in ‘The Critical Edition of Q’. This reconstruction of so-called Q is based on the assumption that the author of the gospel of Luke had no access to a copy of Matthew (and vice versa), which corresponds to the Two-source Hypothesis. I believe however that the author (final editor) of Luke may have used copies of Mark, an early version of Luke, Matthew as well as Q-lite to write his gospel version and that his gospel is foremost an extension of an earlier version of Luke (just like Marcion’s Gospel of the Lord is also an earlier version of Luke). This leads to a different type of Q usually called ‘Q-lite’ from which sayings with typical Matthean appearance and content are excluded. This tentative reconstruction owes a lot to the work of Ronald Price (see links below).

    Every translation is always an interpretation. If these sayings were ever spoken by a historical Yahshua, they would have been originally spoken in Aramaic. So in that case even the official Greek reconstruction cannot be seen as original but may contain words that were misinterpreted and mistranslated by the proto-Christian editors.

    In most cases it is possible to identify the more primitive text variant and assign that version to Q-lite. In rare cases however I have not been able to say which variant is more primitive such as with Q 11: 2 the prayer ‘Let Your Rule come’ in Matthew or ‘Let Your Holy Spirit come’ in Marcion and early Luke. Such text variants perhaps suggest that there was no uniform Q-lite text available to both authors. Also in Q 11: 52 Marcion and Luke have ‘for you take away the key to mystic knowledge (ten kleida tes gnoseos)’ but Matthew has ‘for you lock the Rule of God in front of people’. This could perhaps be explained by assuming each author took a different half of the original ‘for you take away the key to mystic knowledge (gnoseos) and lock the Rule of God in front of people’.

    Read on ...
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Administrator Admin

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    Just to defend my namesake here, Thomas is not really a gnostic gospel in the sense of the 'Gnostic' schools of the early Christian era, but that's just a quibble... Thomas is a sapiential or a gnosis-teaching, yes, but contains little relevance to assumed Gnostic cosmologies.

    I'd have to ask for a definition of 'tantric-mystic', as a quick search on the web suggests 'Tantric' can mean many different things?

    Reading through the commentaries, I find them all quite anodyne – seems a commentary of self-discipline, spiritual or humanist?

    OK ... but does rather beg the inevitable question of ... where's the evidence for that?

    There seems to be a lot of assumption throughout.

    Or maybe something else was being spoken of, that the author has missed, in bringing pre-conceptions to the text? Bearing in mind Christianity has produced any number of world-renown commentaries on the spiritual path ...

    Indeed.
     
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  3. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens Admin

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    I like that it posts the sayings of Christ in an accessible way, reminding what Christ actually said, which seems often lost in these debates about who Jesus was ... the Gospel sayings of Jesus, and their universal acceptance and ability to fit in with all faiths and beliefs
     
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  4. Navigius

    Navigius New Member

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    What reasons are there supporting this claim?
     
  5. Thomas

    Thomas Administrator Admin

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    Hi Navigus – Welcome.

    Sadly the author does not offer any reasoning. I doubt many scholars would agree that Acts is all 'mythical' in the rather pejorative sense (I assume) of being a fiction.

    Again, the "Some think ..." is really not supported with evidence, so one could say "Some think he came from outer space".

    The relationship between the orthodox canon and other texts have to be considered, as best we can, within the historical context. So some testimonies we can say are most likely fictional, while other texts, such as Thomas, have original and authentic sayings, but presented in an uncertain context.

    What the author does demonstrate is how wisdom teachings can be applied, or interpreted, any number of ways. Whether that is how the person intended however, is a whole different hill of beans, as they say.

    What's your thoughts?
     
  6. Navigius

    Navigius New Member

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    I did not know of the existence of the document.
     
  7. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens Admin

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    I actually just posted it to demonstrate how universal the message of Jesus is -- in the sense it works for everybody on every level. Also to remind of what those sayings say, because most don't read them often?
     

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