I am interested in buddhism can someone explain to me the basics?

Discussion in 'Buddhism' started by neophyte2021, Jul 24, 2021.

  1. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Search, be your own guru.

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    321
    And is there a God to heal your illness? If there is a God then why do you need medical help? That is what Buddha said in a way. If you have an illness, go straight to a doctor, don't wait for God to heal it. And illness is not the only kind of suffering. You may suffer because some one has not allowed you to have your due. You may have desires which are not fulfilled. They will also cause distress.

    Yes, Buddhism is a religion of works - what works in life. Buddha advised against spacious speculation which does not bring you any benefit in life. Is there as God? How was the universe created? Of course, all religions expect you to behave good, but that does not get you 'nirvana'. 'Nirvana', IMHO, is the true understanding of the world after which there is no unanswered question.

    I am not aware of any miracles in Buddhism and do not think Buddha believed in any. Buddhism itself is a miracle, much ahead of its time, more than 2,600 years ago.

    "In Buddhism, there is no concept of punishment or reward and there is no divine being who decides who goes* to hell or heaven."
    Heaven and hell in Buddhism (Google Search)
    * Because there is nobody to go. Humans and all other things have no 'atta'. They are 'anatta' (without substance) and 'anicca' (impermanent).

    Again, members who know more about Buddhism are welcome to clarify/modify what I have said. I take Buddha a my teacher but I am not a Buddhist per say.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
  2. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    221
    Source?
     
  3. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    221
    @Cino, so the Tathagatagarbha tradition teaches an immortal, indestructible essence in contrast to the Madhyamika because they noticed people were freaking out?

    Another view is as follows: some monks noticed the teachings of their fellow Buddhists about emptiness were incomplete, partially encompassing the Buddha's earlier teachings. It had nothing to do with the reaction of laypeople.

    This incomplete view is sometimes categorized as the second turning of the wheel of dharma.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
  4. seattlegal

    seattlegal Mercuræn Buddhist

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    6,635
    Likes Received:
    110
    I would recommend The Heart of Buddha's Teaching by Thich Nhat Hanh
     
  5. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    221
    I haven't read this one, but I would like to. What did you think of it?
     
    seattlegal likes this.
  6. seattlegal

    seattlegal Mercuræn Buddhist

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    6,635
    Likes Received:
    110
    Your intentional actions inform the habits you fall back on when you are unmindful. If you act skillfully when you are mindful, you will sow skillful habits to fall back on during the times when you are unmindful. Likewise, if you sow unskillful habits, you will reap unskillful results.

    The Four Noble Truths interpreted from this perspective:


    1. The truth of dukkha (suffering, anxiety, unsatisfactoriness)
    2. The truth of the origin of dukkha
    3. The truth of the cessation of dukkha
    4. The truth of the path leading to the cessation of dukkha

    My simplified explanation of the Four Noble Truths for western minds in light of karma as habit-or-skill-forming intention:
    1. the truth of stress and suffering (unskillful effect),
    2. the truth of the origination of stress (unskillful cause),
    3. the truth of the cessation of stress (skillful effect),
    4. the truth of the path to the cessation of stress (skillful cause).
     
    Ahanu likes this.
  7. seattlegal

    seattlegal Mercuræn Buddhist

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    6,635
    Likes Received:
    110
    Clearly explained.
     
    Ahanu likes this.
  8. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic) Admin

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    The origins of the various schools are the subject of research, and there are many views and opinions. I should have clearly labeled mine as such, sorry for that.

    In my understanding, Mahayana was a school that had much more layperson / householder involvement than preceding or contemporary, more monastic ones like early Theravada. It shows in the topics discussed, the style of the texts, later on even in the languages employed (shift to contemporary languages to write new sutras and commentaries).

    The teachings about the Buddha Womb, Tathagatagarbha, is, as you say a Mahayana, "second turning of the Wheel of Dharma" teaching. Even so, I see it as referring to the ever-available individual potential of awakening, rather than to immortal individual souls.

    How do you understand the Buddha Womb?
     
    Ahanu likes this.
  9. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    221
    I would have to review the details of this topic, so I can't comment on it for now.

    For now I would like to clarify what I wrote. The second turning of the wheel of dharma (the incomplete teachings) includes the teachings of Nagarjuna, not the teachings of those Buddhists that accepted the Tathagatagarbha tradition. Tathagatagarbha would be listed under the third turning of the wheel of dharma in this grand schema, representing the Buddha's highest and most complete teachings for some Buddhists.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
    Cino likes this.
  10. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic) Admin

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    Yes, you have a point, although Buddhism being the complex thing it is, the "third turning" often refers to tantric Buddhism, like the schools of Vajrayana or Shingon. Tathagatagarbha teaching arose as part of the second turning, afaik, but of course the later schools embraced it and ran with it.

    To give an impression of the time frames, the historical Buddha was a contemporary of the presocratic Greek philosophers. Early Tantric Buddhism, 3rd turning teachings arose around the time the Roman empire adopted Christianity, and continued to develop. I think it is fair to assume similar leaps in doctrine and philosophy. The Buddha-Womb / Buddha-Nature / Tathagatagarbha teachings relate to the historical Buddha's roughly like teachings about the Trinity would relate to Parmenides' ontology, in terms of intellectual and spiritual development.
     
  11. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Search, be your own guru.

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    321
    :) Tathagatagarbha is not Buddha's womb, he was a man. Tathagatagarbh is from where all things (Tatha + agata: Thus arrived) come (the ball of energy before inflation hit the nascent universe). It is a sort of vault. Hindus had "Hiranyagarbha" (The Golden womb) in RigVeda. :D
     
    Cino likes this.
  12. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic) Admin

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    The vault or womb where Tathagatas come from, in that sense, I think it is meant (although I admit I love the ambiguity of the phrase, "Buddha womb")? Tathagata being one of the epithets of the Buddha.

    A latinized version I have seen is "Buddha Matrix".
     
  13. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Search, be your own guru.

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    321
    IMHO, 'Tatha āgata' (thus arrived, thus arisen) can mean all things in the universe, not just Buddha. Like what Hindus call 'Bhutas' (all things that come into existence). That includes humans as well as stones.
    Well, that may be my brain-wave, may not be the Buddhist view. :D
    I am a minimalist, so, Theravada (Hinayana) suits me well. I have studied Buddhism to the extent it is relevant to me.

    भूत adj. - bhUta - existing
    भूत n. - bhUta - that which is or exists
    https://www.learnsanskrit.cc/index.php?mode=3&direct=au&script=hk&tran_input=bhuta
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
    Cino likes this.
  14. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    3,833
    Likes Received:
    68
  15. seattlegal

    seattlegal Mercuræn Buddhist

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    6,635
    Likes Received:
    110
    Aupmanyav likes this.
  16. seattlegal

    seattlegal Mercuræn Buddhist

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    6,635
    Likes Received:
    110
    Cino likes this.
  17. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Search, be your own guru.

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    321
    Theosophy. I thought Theosophy was extinct.
     
  18. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic) Admin

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2018
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    Haven't you been reading @Nick the Pilot 's posts all these years?
     
  19. neophyte2021

    neophyte2021 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2021
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    7
    I mean im the current days. Are miracles Happen ing now?
     
  20. Aupmanyav

    Aupmanyav Search, be your own guru.

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,467
    Likes Received:
    321
    Depends on one's definition of a miracle. Some people will say that existence of universe or life is a miracle.
     

Share This Page