From whether law schools really exist, to a forgotten concept adjacent to the obedience experiment

TheLightWithin

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I was reading this today https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2023/07/do-law-schools-really-exist/
And in it there was a link to the term "cyranoid" which I had never heard of, not that I remember anyway.
Apparently it was studied by Stanley Milgram, he of the famous psychology experiment on obedience https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment
The term "cyranoid" is borrowed from the theatrical/literary character Cyrano deBergerac, who used someone else as a mouthpiece to get his thoughts across.
The James Martin Center law school article apparently thinks that some activist law students are "cyranoid" and only repeating ideas learned elsewhere.
There are links in the law school article, they lead to these two articles on the less-famous Milgram experiment about the "cyranoid" concept

I am curious what anybody thinks about any of these articles or concepts.
In higher ed, there is a lot of talk about critical thinking. There is simply not enough rigor in teaching us all to synthesize complex material and come up with our own "take" on it that we can defend, and definitely not enough practice in learning to debate with grace, good sportsmanship, "fighting fair" and learning to remain calm and control emotions


As an aside from my own pragmatic work experience:
Sometimes, as a mental health professional, I get the impression some clients who want evaluations and letters to courts or the disability office or worker's comp or wherever, really just want to use me as a mouthpiece. Which I think I can now call a "cyranoid" situation. They want me to deliver THEIR message with MY professional name signed to it. When I was new especially, there wasn't much training or guidance on that and it was hard to know how to get out of that trap with clients(I don't do that kind of work very often, as you can imagine. I don't think it should be asked of most clinicians at all actually, only those who specialize in formal, objective evaluations, but that's just my pet peeve)
 
Fascinating, and I learned a new word!

Have to read that article before writing a real response.
 
If the Cyranoid effect is where 'men and women “relay” messages from other sources rather than speaking their own thoughts', think about how much that is now a part of global net culture. Our main means of communing with others is more about sharing and liking the posts and images of others rather than saying something ourselves.

And ofcouse new developments in AI, like GPT, lets us present original work created by cyranoid bots as our own. Though, I think there are already apps that can detect if some content presented to them is of bot or human origin.
 
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As an aside from my own pragmatic work experience:
Sometimes, as a mental health professional, I get the impression some clients who want evaluations and letters to courts or the disability office or worker's comp or wherever, really just want to use me as a mouthpiece. Which I think I can now call a "cyranoid" situation. They want me to deliver THEIR message with MY professional name signed to it. When I was new especially, there wasn't much training or guidance on that and it was hard to know how to get out of that trap with clients(I don't do that kind of work very often, as you can imagine. I don't think it should be asked of most clinicians at all actually, only those who specialize in formal, objective evaluations, but that's just my pet peeve)
Does anybody on Earth supportively relay a message that they themselves do not support? Why would they want to you deliver a message that is not theirs? A pet peeve. I understand. But you don't have to give your stamp of approval if you don't want to, do you? Isn't all public communication about stating something and then responding positively or negatively(in varying degress) with agreement, disagreement or uncertainty? Three basic forms. Another trinity. o_O
 
But you don't have to give your stamp of approval if you don't want to, do you?
Not really, but when I was new to the gig I was really still figuring out what was an actual job expectation and what I could say no to.
And when trying to learn how to support transgender clients and having to write letters without any objective criteria -- yikes!
 
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