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suanni

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Highly unlikely you've seen or heard of it before Bandit. Its native (as far as I know) to the UK more the north UK than the whole. Beautiful...I would call it a bush....a very large bush...and I guess if it didn't grow in wild abandon here I would definitely consider growing it in my garden.
Seasons greetings Bandit. Wishing you a good one.:)
 

Bandit

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oh i cant wait to get back & talk to you guys about these trees. that yellow blooming bush/tree reminds me a little of a forsynthia bush. i know that probably sounds crazy to some but i want to know all i can about them. & when i see something new I am always fascinated by it.
seasons greetings to you also suanni:)

Juan, I must say i am a little jealous that you got to grow up near some red woods. those forests are amazing to me. & i want to know more about the 6000 year old trees that you mentioned.:)
 

juantoo3

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Well Bandit, have a great holiday. Tried to put up a pic of Methuselah and it didn't work, so maybe another time.
 
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suanni

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Bandit said:
oh i cant wait to get back & talk to you guys about these trees. that yellow blooming bush/tree reminds me a little of a forsynthia bush. i know that probably sounds crazy to some but i want to know all i can about them. & when i see something new I am always fascinated by it.
seasons greetings to you also suanni:)

They do look a lot like forsythia bush but forsythia ain't got its armoury of thorns nor does forsythia flower for so long (neither does broom). They grow wild alongside broom along the riverbank where I live...wild on the coldest windiest tops.... Don't sound crazy to me Bandit. I'll see what I can dig up on them.
I've found some stuff out about it that I didn't know. couple of links
http://www.weeds.crc.org.au/main/wom_gorse.html

http://www.rspb.org.uk/countryside/advice/gorse/index.asp

http://www.nmessences.com/essences/gorse.html
 

Bandit

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Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine said:
Your wish is my command. Here's the article from Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristlecone_pine

Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountains_Bristlecone_Pinehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountains_Bristlecone_Pine
The rings of the tree, named "Prometheus", were counted as 4844, and later as 4862, but they were counted 2.5 m above the germination point, and adding in years with missing rings and the time for it to reach 2.5 m tall, the estimated full age of the tree was over 5000 years

i have never heard of any of those pine trees until now. Pinus aristata ,Pinus balfouriana ,Pinus longaeva . the most rings i have ever counted was about 80 rings. it makes me wonder why these very old trees are all out west. i know there is an old burr oak tree around here that is over 600 years old & they have wires & ropes tied to it supporting a lot of the branches.
 

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suanni said:
They do look a lot like forsythia bush but forsythia ain't got its armoury of thorns nor does forsythia flower for so long (neither does broom). They grow wild alongside broom along the riverbank where I live...wild on the coldest windiest tops.... Don't sound crazy to me Bandit. I'll see what I can dig up on them.
I've found some stuff out about it that I didn't know. couple of links
http://www.weeds.crc.org.au/main/wom_gorse.html

http://www.rspb.org.uk/countryside/advice/gorse/index.asp

http://www.nmessences.com/essences/gorse.html

hey suanni. i know forsythia only goes for about one or two weeks welcoming spring, like the first hedge to bloom & i dont remember it having any or much smell.
i dont think i want that Gorse now after seeing how fast it spreads & it is one very thorny bush. that kind of reminds me of red bayberry, but the thorns on this one are sure to make me bleed a lot. OUCH:)
 

juantoo3

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Kindest Regards, Bandit!

And thank you very much for the link, Phyllis!

I have also heard tell of an ancient grove of Cypress trees, something like 2-3 thousand years old, I want to say somewhere in the Carolinas. I wish I was paying better attention when I heard of it. Another ancient tree that fascinates me is in Africa, I believe it is called the Mother tree, but I have not found it by that name, so I may not be correct.

Although not a tree, I have heard of a mushroom in Oregon that covers something like 20 square miles. I am curious about it as well. Mind you, I don't believe it is a mushroom cap, more like the root system, except mushrooms don't have true roots.

All of these are creatures I hope to one day see.
 

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juantoo3 said:
Kindest Regards, Bandit!

And thank you very much for the link, Phyllis!

I have also heard tell of an ancient grove of Cypress trees, something like 2-3 thousand years old, I want to say somewhere in the Carolinas. I wish I was paying better attention when I heard of it. Another ancient tree that fascinates me is in Africa, I believe it is called the Mother tree, but I have not found it by that name, so I may not be correct.

Although not a tree, I have heard of a mushroom in Oregon that covers something like 20 square miles. I am curious about it as well. Mind you, I don't believe it is a mushroom cap, more like the root system, except mushrooms don't have true roots.

All of these are creatures I hope to one day see.

certain mushrooms die out & keep coming back it seems every year if that area is not disturbed. i have a couple of places here where some type of mushroom grows like that. i just let them grow & it seems each year they are spreading.

i wonder if the tree you are thinking of is bald cypress in NC. that is a new one to me.

here is an article on some older trees in the Eastern States & whole forests that have been found by sattelite that have not been disturbed.
http://www.lauralee.com/news/primevalforests.htm

Satellite Images Reveal U.S. Primeval Forests
[size=-1]By Robert S. Boyd

[size=-1]Mercury News Washington Bureau
[/size]Thu, Nov. 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - Recent images from space satellites reveal hundreds of little-known primeval forests and stands of ancient trees scattered all across the United States. Scientists say these trees -- some dating before the rise of the Roman Empire -- provide an unequaled record of droughts and floods that can help them understand historic disasters and predict environmental changes.

In addition to California's famed redwoods and giant sequoias, researchers have discovered that millions of very old trees remain in their pristine state in dozens of states from New England to the Carolinas and across Texas to Arizona and Nevada.

"We can still find unmolested virgin forests," said David Stahle, a forest scientist at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. "There are still trees that are thousands of years old, the last relics of the great forest primeval that has been heavily disturbed or completely destroyed by man."

According to Stahle, the largest old-growth forest left in the United States consists of ancient blue oaks covering more than 4,000 square miles of the California foothills. But even in the thickly populated eastern United States, Stahle thinks, more than 2,000 square miles of old-growth woodlands survive to this day.

"People used to think there were no ancient trees in the eastern United States. That is not the case," Stahle said. "The abundance of ancient forest sites strongly contradicts the common misconception that most ancient forests were destroyed by logging and agricultural development."

Old-tree hunter Robert Leverett, executive director of the Friends of the Mohawk Trail in Deerfield, Mass., has discovered a 626-year-old black gum tree in New Hampshire. There are 400-year-old red oaks on a Massachusetts mountain in view of the Boston skyline. Only 50 miles north of Manhattan, 500-year-old pitch pines cling to a mountainside in the Hudson River Valley.

Farther south, bald cypress trees, 1,500 to 2,000 years old, dwell along North Carolina's Black River. Stands of 900-year-old junipers survive in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas. About 500 square miles of post oaks up to 400 years old remain in eastern Oklahoma, some only 15 miles from downtown Tulsa.
[/size]
 

Bandit

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i woke up to this in my backyard saturday morning. very cool winter garden or so i think it is.
front & center is the baby weeping willow. if it was not wired to the pole, it would probably be laying on the ground buried.
yes it is weeping that is for sure.


IMG_2728_1000.jpg




top left corner are australian pines. those little clumps up front are blue spruces & the branch in the front of the little fountain is a tulip tree.

IMG_2736_1000.jpg




this big clump is virginia creeper vine. beyond that are some black walnuts & that is where the alligators live.

IMG_2731_1000.jpg
 

lunamoth

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Beautiful pictures Bandit. Makes me homesick for the days I lived in the woods in upstate NY.

cheers,
lunamoth
 

Mason

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suanni said:
Highly unlikely you've seen or heard of it before Bandit. Its native (as far as I know) to the UK more the north UK than the whole. Beautiful...I would call it a bush....a very large bush...and I guess if it didn't grow in wild abandon here I would definitely consider growing it in my garden.
^_^ Those Gorse bushes grow all over the place down here in the southwest, i've seen them from Dorset to Cornwall. If they grow more commonly in the north, well it must be over run with them up there... LoL, i don't know about Beautiful, they are more often than not dead inside and really leggy.
 

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ok. i feel it is safe to say spring has sprung...at least in some parts.

on to the spring bulbs & flowering spring trees & shrubs. i see the daffodils are up about one inch & i am suprized because the crocus are always first & no sign of them yet.

this little diagram kind of explains the difference in what goes on under the ground & what they look like if some do not know already.
it is important to know the difference when dividing & the timing of when to dig em up & what zones they will survive.




[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]
Root%20Storage%20Systems.jpg
[/FONT]


[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Root Storage System Diagram.[/FONT]

http://collections.ic.gc.ca/gardens/Horticulture/The%20Structure%20of%20Plants.htm

one of these little tubers or bulbs can pack a whole lot of plant & blooms:)

anyone have a favorite in mind?
 

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I love the brave crocus because it will bloom first, even if there is still snow. I wish I could get a patch of them going but they always seem to fade after a year or two, rather than naturalize for me.

I love the daffodils because they are so bright and showy when it is often still so bleak, usually around Easter. I've much better luck keeping them going, too.

Tulips are graceful and the color and form variation can't be beat. I'm partial to pink. But, the deer love them and also I have not had much luck naturalizing them.

I have no idea what will come up in my new yard when Spring gets to Colorado, or even what kind of bulbs and annuals I will be able to grow here.
:(

I think Spring will be a lot later here than in MO and hopefully not later than it is in NY.

lunamoth
 

juantoo3

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Kindest Regards!

Nice to see this thread back!

I have been paying a little closer attention this year. With the last full moon things took off like a rocket around here. The azaleas are in full bloom now. The daylillies are up in force. The white clover is blooming all around. My ferns are sprouting left and right. And the oaks around here dropped their leaves last week (this is Florida, evergreen oaks, go figure!) and have been filling the sky with their pollen. The pollen is intense for people with allergies, and I am quickly joining their ranks.

I am still waiting for the phlox and crimson clover though, I expect around easter. I keep watching the "old man's beard" fringe tree by the parking lot at work, no sign of life yet...

Keep an eye on the moon, the phase it is at when things happen. I think you will be pleasantly surprised! Once you figure it out, you can "predict" the following years!
 

juantoo3

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I keep watching the "old man's beard" fringe tree by the parking lot at work, no sign of life yet...
Wouldn't you guess, I no more than post...

The next day in the morning there were little leaf buds beginning to pop out, and by the evening as I was heading home it was pretty plain the tree was leafing out! Aren't we right at the first quarter moon, either last night or tonight?

Spring has sprung...around here anyway. :D
 

juantoo3

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Took my dog down to a park beside the river this morning, and I noticed the trilliums were out in force. The thistles were up too, but their blooms are still pale. Later on they will take a deep purple color. I am surprised the mullein blooms so profusely so early, but some of the spikes I saw are a couple of feet tall already.
 

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juantoo3 said:
Took my dog down to a park beside the river this morning, and I noticed the trilliums were out in force. The thistles were up too, but their blooms are still pale. Later on they will take a deep purple color. I am surprised the mullein blooms so profusely so early, but some of the spikes I saw are a couple of feet tall already.

the stuff comes up real fast down there. i like those purple globe thistles.

i am jealous of the azaleas in the south but all my Rhodos came back. i am looking at some snowball shrubs (vibernum opulus) to add because they tolerate shade & are dependable.
my dandelion garden is coming along real nice. they just popped up out of nowhere...zillions all over the place:D . this was the first year i kind of took a liking to them for the brilliant yellow...not to mention my iguana loved to eat the tops & leaves.
i just got a new bunny this easter for another house pet. a rex breed & i named him digger. so he will be taking the place of eating all the extra greens.

i never heard of trilliums before. i wonder what that is. you know i have one of those tropical spikes that is supposed to only be an annual here. i took it in & it is about 7 years old!
 

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lunamoth said:
I love the brave crocus because it will bloom first, even if there is still snow. I wish I could get a patch of them going but they always seem to fade after a year or two, rather than naturalize for me.

I love the daffodils because they are so bright and showy when it is often still so bleak, usually around Easter. I've much better luck keeping them going, too.

Tulips are graceful and the color and form variation can't be beat. I'm partial to pink. But, the deer love them and also I have not had much luck naturalizing them.

I have no idea what will come up in my new yard when Spring gets to Colorado, or even what kind of bulbs and annuals I will be able to grow here.
:(

I think Spring will be a lot later here than in MO and hopefully not later than it is in NY.

lunamoth

daffodils are forever.

i have noticed a thinning in some tulips also & i cant figure that out. i did 6 different groups years ago. the three groups on one spot keep multiplying, the three groups right next to it are diminishing. i do not understand how that can be.

i have no luck with crown imperial & they cost a lot to lose after one season. i did 200 crocuses one year & the next day the squirrels dug every one of them up & ate them! LOL
 
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