Eastern meditation techniques

Discussion in 'Eastern Religions and Philosophies' started by Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine, Jun 1, 2005.

  1. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    I had my first class today for the summer session, and we were introduced to the (I seem to recall the instructors said it was Tibeten) technique they called "Shamata Vipashna" (I think that's how it's spelled) and I've been pondering the question of other meditation "prana" (I really don't know what the actual term is, so please correct me in any and all terminological faux pas I may make. :) )

    Do any of you also practice meditation and what are some of the techniques you use?

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
     
  2. Vajradhara

    Vajradhara One of Many

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    Namaste Phyllis,

    perhaps they said "Samatha" and "Vipassana"? these are the two main techniques used in the Varjayana found in Tibet. "Samatha" and "Vipassana" are Insight and Calming and depending on where you are in the practice, you may use a single method or a combination of them both.

    the skilled meditator uses the calming meditation initially and then switches, once the mind is calm, to the insight meditation..... it takes a bit of practice :)

    "prana" is breathing meditation and of all the various techniques that a being could employ, the Buddha singled this method out as the most effective. prana meditation can be and often is, part of the calming meditation.

    generally speaking, i engage in Vipassana meditation daily and Samatha meditation a few times a week. in almost every session, i use the prana techniques to "arrive", as we term it, in the present moment.
     
  3. farhan

    farhan Active Member

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    Thanx for your post Vajradhara

    Can U explain a bit more . Or give some link that explains it

    Also , can martial arts be considered as moving meditation , &

    what is the philosophy of taichi & chigong , R they too a form of moving meditation ?? Or they simply used for mind-body coordination ?

    Regards
     
  4. Vajradhara

    Vajradhara One of Many

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    Namaste Farhan,

    thank you for the post.

    sure, do you have any particular questions in this regard?

    this link may be of some value:

    http://www.accesstoinsight.org/canon/sutta/anguttara/an04-170.html

    yes. depending on the type of practice that you are engaged in, even ordinary every day activities like, chopping wood and carrying water are meditations when done with true mindfullness.

    meditation, in a large sense, simply means bringing the fullness of your concentration and attention to bear on an object, thus, a being can develop their concentration and attention through the normal activities of day to day life, including martial arts lessons, i would think.

    well... the philosophy behind the ideas can be a bit cumbersome.. for the purpose of this conversation, i would say "yes" you can consider those as a form of movement meditation as well. the mind/body continumm is something which has a degree of emphasis in the Buddhist tradition, more or less so depending on ones school. so, in that sense, all meditation training is, in essence, a training of the body/mind continumm.

    if you are interested in T'ai C'hi, you may find this link to be useful:

    http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/Philosophy/Taichi/tao-chi.html
     
  5. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    Vaj,

    I told my instructors about your post and your path (without revealing other "personal" stuff like your online moniker) and they told me that they are teaching us what they call the "Shambala" school of meditation (which is a nonreligious school because the class is through a state-run university) but they also teach Vajrayana meditation to people who take classes through their center.

    Have you ever heard of Sakyong Mipham (that might not be his full name)? He was my instructors' teacher.

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
     
  6. Vajradhara

    Vajradhara One of Many

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    Namaste Phyllis,


    thank you for the post.

    ah, Shambala meditation. i'm well acquaited with this method of practice as much of it is found in my own lineage of Nyingma-po. the Shambala training was started in the West in 1976 by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche who has also written many wonderful books for beings in the West to gain an understanding of the traditions from Tibet. one of my favorites of his is Glimpses of Abidharma.

    Mipham Rinpoche is Chogyams son as many of the Nyingma teachings are part of the Whispered Oral Tradition and thus, families or clans tend to pass the teachings down their line, as it were.

    he was given the title of Sakyong in 1995 which means, Earth Protector.

    for other interesed readers, you can find information on the Shambala training and Shambala Centers here:

    http://sti.shambhala.org/index.html
     
  7. Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine Junior Moderator, Intro

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    We've started "contemplative" meditation (first one was Thursday) and I have a rather :p question: what are the various things/sayings/whatever one calls them that are contemplated during this particular meditation?

    Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
     

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