Is this offensive?

Discussion in 'Hinduism' started by NoName, Apr 30, 2006.

  1. NoName

    NoName New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Before I came here I was trying to leran about the other Religons on my own, I found a Hindu web site and I ask a qusiton and the respose I got was not vary welcoming. They seem to acused me of somthing much more sinster and I am still trying to figure out what I said. I am not attacking you I just want to know if I said anything that was offencive to your religon and if I did I am vary sory. This what I said

    Hello, I am a Christian and I would like know what your religon has say to about non Hindus?

    is this a offcensive qustion

    sorry for my bad spelling
     
  2. YNOT

    YNOT Zen philosopher

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Certainly not. There may be some cultural misunderstandings though. It could be that other cultures find queries, no matter how sincere and respectful, as threats to their world-understanding. I want to think that if the conversation were able to continue, this person would come to understand where you were coming from.

    Just a thought. Nice to meet you. I'm Tony.

    Namaste
     
  3. Quahom1

    Quahom1 What was the question?

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,906
    Likes Received:
    5
    I think you've come to the right place to get your question answered. And welcome to CR. ;)

    v/r

    Q
     
  4. NoName

    NoName New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice to meet you

    I think that may be close to what happen. From what they said it sounded like there religous tensions going on in asia between Hindus, Buddus and Christains. Mabey I just came at the wrong time.
     
  5. Agnideva

    Agnideva Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2005
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Namaste NoName,

    Welcome to CR :).


    Your question is not offensive at all, NoName. To my knowledge, there is nothing in Hinduism that specifically deals with the fate of those who are non-Hindus. In other words, the people who are following Hinduism are not guaranteed anything special (ie. place in heaven or better birth, etc.) just because they are Hindus. In Hinduism, generally speaking, the fate of an individual is dependent on the person’s karmas, in this and previous lives, and the ability of that person to adhere to her/his dharma. Since the principles of karma, dharma, and rebirth are considered universal, the same laws would apply to all.

    Hope that helps.

    OM Shanti,
    A.
     
  6. PrachandaChandikA

    PrachandaChandikA New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi NoName,

    As AgniDeva suggested there is no scriptural guidance on the fate of non-hindu's as hinduism is not a sect. What is said is we will be passing through many births in this creation or the next and only way to liberation from this cycle is by knowing God. This applies to all beings, not just humas and certainly not just hindu's. However the process re-birth and place & time of re-birth are all governed by our actions and mental convictions and mohas. It will be too complex to go into those things, but I will give you slight hint as I received.

    Human being is not just the body. This the basis of sprituality. Semetic faiths also believe this~though the idea of sprit in those faiths is bound to the current body. In hinduism we take rebirths in many bodies till liberation. Spirit is the unchanging reality and not body. So my fate after death is very much guided by my bondage to this body. If I'm a judgement day believer and fully convinced that I'll be resurrected some thousand years after my death in my current body~chances are that my spirit will stay as a hundgry ghost around my grave~untill my sprit realizes that he is bonded to a dead body and journeys back to the seed state for rebirth. On the other hand an atheist with no belief in god make take a rebirth quickly as he/she doesn't think the bdy is permament. Our fate is completely determined by our mind's quest to know the truth and ability to let go mental bondages. This takes many births.

    My post here is not to speculate on the fate of judgement day believers, but just to give you an idea how some hindu's look at the fate after death. As you see it completely depends on how open you are in mind. Most people are not open and are very much bound to their current life and body including ordinary hindu's. rebirth becomes a painful process in that case and roaming as a hungry ghost is a real hell. That's why among hindu's there are rituals called pinda danam and sraddha where we offer sacrifices for these ghosts and pray for them to break the earthly bondage to the lost life. Infact in this ritual a hindu not only prays for the diseased relative but all souls (ncluding non-hindus and christians) who may be trapped in a ghost state. Such rituals were common among many ancient religions other than hinduism which are now extint because a few self-deterministic thought they were primitive~in reality they are most sceintific religious rituals.

    Hope this helps
     
  7. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Messages:
    6,532
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hi PrachandaChandikA, and welcome to CR. :)
     
  8. PrachandaChandikA

    PrachandaChandikA New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks ... I didn't bothered to put myself for an intro in the appropiate section:)
    I like your avatar
     
  9. lucius

    lucius New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello Prachanda - very interesting post. What you say about rituals for the dead is interesting. In Christianity too, prayers are often said for the dead, and it is believed that this can help the dead person.
    But there are differences as you point out. However, I should point out that not all Christians believe literally in the resurrection of the body. The tendency is more to see the soul as existing in another plane of being after death.

    The big differnce is the idea of re-incarnation.
     
  10. PrachandaChandikA

    PrachandaChandikA New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi lucius thanks for your post.
    My idea of christianity is limited and but I understand that resurrection is the dominant theme among the most major denominations of christianity?? But I have also heard about what you say~praying for the dead in some christian denomincations~eg mormonism. Mormonism took many things from native indian practices and I believe in native indian systems ancestor worship was the dominant theme.

    Personally I think the main thing is spirituality which is based on the "belief" that we are not this body, nor this mind. For me re-birth in earth is not the key about spirituality, although most oriental systems believe in it~and in our system it is said that at a certain stage of realization one can know one's past birth~so not fully a belief.

    Passing into a higher realm or plane is the goal of some hindu sects ~ it is called "samipya mukti". samipya means close=close to god. mukti is liberation. So liberation by passing into a plane of existence which is closer to god.
     
  11. PrachandaChandikA

    PrachandaChandikA New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think that is not the biggest difference~ofcourse it comes as the biggest difference in spiritual understanding of the two faiths. I would say the biggest difference to abrahamism to other religions is the beilef of salvation only through their last prophet. For christians it is thus the belief of salavation only through christ. Also another point of departure with hinduism and buddhism is that belief is enough for being saved. Both hindu or the buddhist will say belief is just a mental idea it changes and hence cannot be cause of salvation. Of course even the monist hindu is theist unlike the buddhist and belief is important, but the mere first step.

    the idea of spiritual goal varies so much even within the same faith, that I don't regard them to be point of difference or conflict. Difference are useful for not all humans are same~a thing which hinduism accepted from the start. Truth may be one, but not all can see it with same eyes. Not all are equally true, but none the less helpful stepping stone of progress. So I don't think there is any problem with a no rebirth, or no belief in karma etc, even though my belief is very different and I won't agree personally. But I think there is a problem with "salvation only through christ"~the hallmark of abrahamism in general. If that goes, christianity becomes another faith and a spiritual system of humanaity. It may or may not be 100% true~but will sure help some who are in need of such beliefs for progress.

    But I know that this now a days doesn't apply to all christians. Some I have talked over net say the christainity in most general sense is the belief that christ was God.Full Stop. I'm sure many hindu's will say the same, or at least find it very compatible with their won beliefs - for Lord Krishna promised his many appearences through many ages more than 5000 years's back
     
  12. lucius

    lucius New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    To take up your last point - I think Jesus can be seen in the same way Hinduism sees the Avatar. God coming here in a form for the purpose of revelation of Himself and so on. Orthodox Christians, of whom, incidentally, I am not one, would not accept this. As you say, it is only the one Incarnation they will accept.

    To mention some other points in relation to your post - "as a man sows, so shall he reap" - that saying of Jesus seems to contain an idea similar to karma in the way it is often understood.

    In popular Christianity belief is indeed thought to be enough - or belief and faith. Both are neccesary stages, but some more mystical Christians have gone further - into actual knowledge of God, in the same sense as mystics of Hindu, Sufi, and other traditions have done. However, such individuals are a rarity. Nonetheless, they have to be acknowledged I think.

    I think actually though, the one huge difference between Christianity and Hindu Vaishnavism for instance, is the insistence on Jesus sacrificial death as the 'only way' to salvation (however that is conceived of). From my own studies, it seems clear enough that Vaishnavsa seek a relationship with a personal God - Krishna. That is not enough for the Christian - they maintain that it is Christ's death and ressurection that are central. In other respects though there are distinct similarities between these two paths.

    It is also worth noting that in the early centuries of the Christian era, were many so called 'Gnostic' sects. The word 'Gnosis' is similar to the sanskrit 'Jnana' and refers to spiritual knowledge. Further, some of these gnostics also held a belief in re-incarnation, and the goal was concieved of as liberation from the material world. In essence, not disimilar from some Hindu ideas.
    It's very likely that the idea of re-incarnation came to the gnostics from the ancient Greeks, such as Plato and his followers. The idea may have come to them in turn from India, possibly through Persia. So it is speculated.

    Thanks anyway for your very interesting posts.
     

Share This Page