how faith might work - jesus, krishna and others

shadowman

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christian indoctrination is so awesome that the name jesus sparks up tons of subconscous associations in te psyche, often praying (a mantra centered around jesus) can feel good, or lead us to experience what a pastor or christian would call "proof that the word is the real deal" when one is moved in the "heart" or feels "deep down jesus calling them" as the song goes, there is something about that name. there is something about the name abortion too, but jesus is a whole nother level of word sound power.

ancient egyptians knew that words and phrases conjure up all kinds of gateways in the mind, and the bible is writtin in a similar psychologically almost indestructable fashion. there really is an answer for everything, and it safeguards beleivers agaist escaping once it has them in their grasps. this is either because (gulp) its real, and god works on a dynamic of join us or die. and there are ovens somewhere roasting billions of siners forever, and we were created in sin and deserve to be there and should be gracious that we have the love of jesus to stop us from burning. somehow i still dont grasp the undying love.

but its so heavily written, it is hard to escape, and the proof in the pudding, memorization of the aspects and attributes of jesus (jesus takes weight of world off your shoulders, all the wieght it seems except worrying about all the poor saps who "chose hell".... he listens and forgives everything, he can strengthen you with fruits of the spirit, he is the only real connection to god and not the devil, he saves unconditionally from a place worse than any man could create, its a place so bad it is undivinely, unholy created, truly awfl and terrible) these attributes fire off subconsciously.

i think all "religions of faith" work like this. in krishna consciousness (we might as well call chrstianity jesus consciousness, although that might betray the psychological nature of it all) one is asked to memorize krishnas attributes and then hant krishna mantras and let the word sound vibrations work on your mind to make you holier and holier. they basically say "this is gentle brainwashing" without actually saying it.

the bible is way more subversive since it is abook of stories from history. churc hymns like "jesus is the truth and the truth shall set you free" really **** someone up in the long run. talk about going int a trance like state and associating jesus deep down with truth, freedom, dancing, and music!

art least i think thats how it works, like how i TREALLY REALLY REALLY works.

i hope it doesnt work because jesus is real and all that. in that case. see you in hell.
 
there is an invisible realm of fallen angels and wandering demon spirits. because christ has already come and sent the holy spirit, any other conversation to any other spirit is not of god. only that which is from god is of eternal heaven, all else will have a destruction and an end.
 
This isn't really the right board for this thread, I would say. It doesn't have anything to do with Christianity really.
 
moseslmpg said:
This isn't really the right board for this thread, I would say. It doesn't have anything to do with Christianity really.

Agreed. Moved to Spirituality.
 
Mantras are used for calming your mind in meditation, not indoctrination. You can say whatever you want, but obviously it is more appropriate to meditate on Jesus in Christianity and Krishna or Brahman in Hinduism. After a while, your subconscious associates this mantra with the state of meditation, and it is easier to meditate when using it.

Also, Christianity is not trying to take over the world and it's not evil in and of itself. It really depends on what you want to focus on, and that is common to all religions except the fake ones, I would assume.
 
Also, Christianity is not fond of mantra type repetition. It isn't the sound of the "prayer" that Christianity focusses on, but rather the meaning behind it.
 
Quahom1 said:
Also, Christianity is not fond of mantra type repetition. It isn't the sound of the "prayer" that Christianity focusses on, but rather the meaning behind it.
Seems the rosary has a mantra feel to it, as does the hallelujah chorus... I think sound often is used to provide a background to get one in a meditative/prayerful state...seems that is what most choirs are about... I've often thought of the assocation between aum and I am...
 
This comes back to the opening of the Dhammapada. Thought is a powerful thing! ;)

And sound, and even human emotion. There is the expression, "the pen is mightier than the sword!"

Sound can both create and destroy. Witness the opera singer. Witness Pythagoras, and the Music of the Spheres! God seems to literally sung the universe into Creation.

We have the choice to flatter, by imitation, or to mold & shape ourselves and the world around us ... into exactly what we desire. Free will!

Love and Light,

andrew
 
wil said:
Seems the rosary has a mantra feel to it, as does the hallelujah chorus... I think sound often is used to provide a background to get one in a meditative/prayerful state...seems that is what most choirs are about... I've often thought of the assocation between aum and I am...

Knew you were going to bring that up. Have you ever said the rosary?
 
Quahom1 said:
Knew you were going to bring that up. Have you ever said the rosary?
2 funny, I've not said the rosary. I have been sitting next to people on a bus or a plane and seen the beads rolling through their fingers as they have been going through the words...that is why I indicated it had a chant/mantra feel. I've also heard some kind of prayers/chant to the St for lost things?? as one is looking for something.

Again this is me on the outside looking in...so why did you 'know' that 'I' was going to bring this up? Am I that predictable Q?
 
wil said:
2 funny, I've not said the rosary. I have been sitting next to people on a bus or a plane and seen the beads rolling through their fingers as they have been going through the words...that is why I indicated it had a chant/mantra feel. I've also heard some kind of prayers/chant to the St for lost things?? as one is looking for something.

Again this is me on the outside looking in...so why did you 'know' that 'I' was going to bring this up? Am I that predictable Q?

Your curiosity is...;)

The decats of the rosary are used to focus on which ever station of Christ's life the individual is reflecting upon (there are 15 stations to consider, and some consider there to be 16. The traditional three mysteries are the Joyful, Sorrowful, and Glorious, wherein the fourth mysteries are called the Luminous). The "mantra" style is not so much a prayer as it is an affirmation of the belief of the one saying the rosary.

While saying the rosary one ponders each station and what it means (such as the announcement to Mary that she would bear a son called Emmanuel, part of the Joyful mysteries).

Rather than empty one's mind, the rosary helps "fill" one's mind with reflection on the life of Jesus. Of course it also is a request for "intercession" on the behalf of the one saying the rosary by Mary, before the Throne of God.

I do not often say the rosary (mea culpa), but the times that I have, have resulted in some pretty amazing things in my life.

Being a Chief in the Chief's mess on a ship, we know everything that is going on with everyone on board (that is our job). Any way once, when we were at sea, a crewmember got news that his wife was having medical problems. Now this guy was a professed atheist, but for some reason I felt compelled to pray for he and his family. So in the quiet of the night, I sat on a ballard on the fantail of our ship, and said a rosary. I thought I was alone, but then the flare of a cigarette corrected that misnomer...it was him also standing on the fantail. Anyway he came up to me and asked why I did that (pray the rosary). I thought for a moment, then said simply "I thought you and your wife could use some prayers and peace of mind..."

He didn't say anything for a few moments. Then quietly murmured "No one has ever done that for me before." He put out his cigarette, turned to go inside the skin of the ship, then said "Thankyou".

Now I don't profess that he converted to religion. But a few days later he was laughing on the mess deck and obviously relieved and relaxed. When I passed by the table he was at, he was telling his buddies how his wife's situation/condition had amazingly improved (he got a message from the Red Cross). And he looked up me as I was passing, with a strange smile on his mouth and a glint in his eyes, and gave me the "thumbs up". I nodded and smiled slightly back and continued on my way.

I believe.;)

v/r

Q
 
Quahom1 said:
Your curiosity is...;)

The decats of the rosary are used to focus on which ever station of Christ's life the individual is reflecting upon (there are 15 stations to consider, and some consider there to be 16. The traditional three mysteries are the Joyful, Sorrowful, and Glorious, wherein the fourth mysteries are called the Luminous). The "mantra" style is not so much a prayer as it is an affirmation of the belief of the one saying the rosary.

While saying the rosary one ponders each station and what it means (such as the announcement to Mary that she would bear a son called Emmanuel, part of the Joyful mysteries).

Rather than empty one's mind, the rosary helps "fill" one's mind with reflection on the life of Jesus. Of course it also is a request for "intercession" on the behalf of the one saying the rosary by Mary, before the Throne of God.

I do not often say the rosary (mea culpa), but the times that I have, have resulted in some pretty amazing things in my life.

Being a Chief in the Chief's mess on a ship, we know everything that is going on with everyone on board (that is our job). Any way once, when we were at sea, a crewmember got news that his wife was having medical problems. Now this guy was a professed atheist, but for some reason I felt compelled to pray for he and his family. So in the quiet of the night, I sat on a ballard on the fantail of our ship, and said a rosary. I thought I was alone, but then the flare of a cigarette corrected that misnomer...it was him also standing on the fantail. Anyway he came up to me and asked why I did that (pray the rosary). I thought for a moment, then said simply "I thought you and your wife could use some prayers and peace of mind..."

He didn't say anything for a few moments. Then quietly murmured "No one has ever done that for me before." He put out his cigarette, turned to go inside the skin of the ship, then said "Thankyou".

Now I don't profess that he converted to religion. But a few days later he was laughing on the mess deck and obviously relieved and relaxed. When I passed by the table he was at, he was telling his buddies how his wife's situation/condition had amazingly improved (he got a message from the Red Cross). And he looked up me as I was passing, with a strange smile on his mouth and a glint in his eyes, and gave me the "thumbs up". I nodded and smiled slightly back and continued on my way.

I believe.;)

v/r

Q

I believe, too. Great testimony, Q.

I would venture to say that perhaps it wasn't so much as saying the rosary as saying any kind of prayer for this individual, whether you be Catholic, Lutheren, Baptist, or what have you. I firmly believe that God touched this man's heart because you, Q, had enough faith in God to care for the needs of this person. That this person, being an athiest, has gotten a glimpse of the power of prayer from someone he sees cares for him and his family. God has mercifully given this person a spark of hope in the God you believe in. You've shown him love.
 
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