Comparative Mysticism

Discussion in 'Alternative' started by Limbo, Jan 6, 2007.

  1. Limbo

    Limbo New Member

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    Yes one certainly could say that. In fact, that same metaphor was used very well in a very beautiful video titled [SIZE=-1] Fire on the Mountain: A Gathering of Shamans.

    [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4749156257249602834
    [/SIZE]
    A very important gathering hosted by the Dalai Lama. I highly recommend it.

    I like to think of the various traditions as instruments in a symphony, playing together. The various instruments sound different, but they play the same melody.
     
  2. taijasi

    taijasi Gnōthi seauton

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    Would not cacophony and chaos ensue if the percussionists all insisted that *their* contribution was "unresolvable" into the harmony of the rest of the symphony? Or if the reedy oboe insisted that his own song was unique, and that only the clarinets had enough in common to accompany him?

    It concerns me that even a single member of the orchestra feels his or her contribution is somehow unique or different enough to stand out in contrast to the rest of the performers. Why is it so difficult to appreciate that just as all the cellists must harmonize, and just as all the string instruments must harmonize, so also must the entire orchestra, with all the many & varied instruments, must harmonize - if there is to be a beautiful symphony, with one melody, and one theme?

    There are string quartets, and woodwind quintets, precisely to highlight and emphasize the beauty of a particular family of instruments, and in these arrangements, it is true - the harmony and melody sometimes celebrates the unique sound of one (type of) instrument. Even chamber music, however, requires *years* of experience in a full orchestra before the virtuoso touch may be perfected.

    I'll check out the video on Google. Thanks, Limbo. :)

    ~Zag
     
  3. wayfaring

    wayfaring Mystic

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    Take a look at:

    spiritualminded.blogspot.com

    for an ongoing mystical journal and related articles. The position here is trans-religious, that is, no one religion is subscribed to though it draws fom many. It is also panentheistic and theomorphic.
     
  4. InLove

    InLove at peace

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    The occasional solo performed by one of these true virtuosos can, in a perfect moment, add something invaluable to the overall production. ;)

    InPeace,
    InLove
     
  5. wayfaring

    wayfaring Mystic

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    Try 'Paths to transcendence according to Shankara, Ibn Arabi amd Meister Eckhart' by Reza Shah-Kazemi (World Wisdom) A very good systematic comparison of three outstanding mystics.
     
  6. charonpr

    charonpr New Member

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    Hi Limbo,

    Would just like to say thanks for the image (now printed and pinned to my wall) and video. I wish you the very best with your project and look forward to hearing about any updates. I’ve had an interest in this subject for many years, though on a mostly on-off basis. However, for the last two years it has been growing at a huge rate, so much so that I am planning on making religion the main speculation on a degree course with the Open University.
    I think the only reason it’s not become a loved obsession is that I am too unsure of my own beliefs (but looking forward to exploring this!).
    Where did you find that image by the way?

    Thanks everyone else for the other great links:)

    Best wishes
     
  7. Pathless

    Pathless Fiercely Interdependent

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    The ocean is a place of intense beauty, interconnection, and even otherworldliness for us humans, is it not? It seems to me that it often induces in people altered states of consciousness. I came across the following Eugene O'Neill quote in a "Zen-a-Day" calendar a few years back:

    "I lay on the bowsprit, with the water foaming into spume under me, the masts with every sail white in the moonlight towering above me. I became drunk with the beauty and singing rhythm of it, and for a moment lost myself--actually loast my life. I was set free... dissolved in the sea, became white sails and flying spray, became beauty and rhythm and the high dim-starred sky... I belonged within a unity and joy to life itself."
     
  8. Erik Masters

    Erik Masters New Member

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    I recently read an excellent ebook on comparative mysticism called "the greatest achievement in life" by RD Krumpos.

    The ebook compares the mystical schools of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, has more than 100 quotations of mystics, and gives guidelines for personal approaches to mysticism. It is concise (104 pages), quite comprehensive and it is free.

    After reading dozens of books on mysticism, I found that ebook to be the clearest of all of them.
     
  9. Paladin

    Paladin Purchased Bewilderment

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    Hello Erik, and welcome! I found the e-book online, but tell me what was it that impressed you the most about this book?
     
  10. Erik Masters

    Erik Masters New Member

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    As I said, it's concise, comprehensive and free. That's welcome because many of the other books I've read are too scholarly, do not cover all faiths equally (usually favoring one), and sometimes cost too much. Look at the review; the interfaith Buddhist in Hong Kong says it better (and certainly longer) than I can here.
     
  11. wil

    wil UNeyeR1 Moderator

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    Erik,

    How is it you came by here to tell us about this book?

    "I've just read a book and I need to tell someone about it?"

    for some reason the skeptic in me thinks people must be now paid to run around and recommend things online as if they were consumers....
     
  12. Erik Masters

    Erik Masters New Member

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    Wil,

    Why would anyone pay me to promote a free book? If it doesn't interest you just ignore it.

    Are you skeptical about mysticism (the majority of people are), comparative mysticism (some say the traditions are not comparable), and/or about my own motivations?

    I'd be delighted to know about your favorite books or essays on comparative mysticism. There is always more to learn.
     
  13. Paladin

    Paladin Purchased Bewilderment

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    What I mean was, what did you come away with? What points were the most salient for you. After all a dictionary can be concise and comprehensive.
     
  14. Erik Masters

    Erik Masters New Member

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    Paladin,

    What was salient for me might be less important for you. Browse through it. You might find some things of interest. What books on comparative mysticism have most impressed you?
     
  15. Paladin

    Paladin Purchased Bewilderment

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    Erik, It's definitely on my reading list, which is quite long even now! For some reason it keeps getting longer instead of shorter! Over the last thirty years I have read and practiced many religions, but consider myself a Buddhist at heart. The comparisons were gleaned by practice and study over a very long time.
    I think what is most salient in the devotional quality of Christian and Hindu practice as it stands in stark contrast to the more intellectual Zen practice. At some point one sees that things are, that reality is, and God? Well, all I can tell you is that at some point you stop seeking, stop grasping and become what you always were.

    Now there is nowhere to go, and nothing to get.
     
  16. Erik Masters

    Erik Masters New Member

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    Paladin,

    ...there is nowhere to go, and nothing to get. Perfect! Infinitely here and eternally now, uncreated and unchanging, the essence of all always is.

    There have been many intellectuals among Christian and Hindu mystics (and Sufis and kabbalists, too). Some were quoted in Krumpos' ebook and many more are discussed in the books in his bibliography.
     
  17. Dedicated Mind

    Dedicated Mind Interfaith Forums

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    perennial philosophy by aldous huxley is a classic, great book. just what you are looking for imo.
     

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