witch or wizard?????

Discussion in 'Pagan' started by Faolan, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Faolan

    Faolan New Member

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    Here a question that may sound a little ignorant on my part but I'll ask anyway.
    Why do male wiccans call themselves witches?? Why not wizards ro some other similar name? I completely understand not calling oneself a warlock for the modern definition of the word.
     
  2. brucegdc

    brucegdc Moderator

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    Why not?

    Why *not* use the term witch for both? For some, it's a case of balance - both genders being equal and balanced, a single term can apply to both. Others dislike the genderization of names and titles - and other than popular mythos, there's no reason a witch can't be male.

    Wizard also tends to imply ceremonial magic, which is different from the usual Wiccan methods.

    Most male wiccans I know call themselves "Wiccan" rather than any other term, usually.
     
  3. bgruagach

    bgruagach eclectic Wiccan

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    Oberon Zell-Ravenheart (a very influential Pagan, who among other things was responsible for the now-defunct magazine "Green Egg," and who helped start the Church of All Worlds) has a new book out called "Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard." It's an interesting book, drawing mostly from Wiccan practice but also from other magickal systems such as ceremonial magick and shamanism. He encourages the use of the term "wizard" as well as "witch" for both genders.

    The book has a strong Harry Potter theme to it as well. While I'm sure that will help the book sales (Harry Potter mania and all) I think it will make the book rather "dated" in a few years as Potter-mania fades. Despite the marketing angle of the book, it really is an excellent magickal primer. I've been practicing Wicca now for over twenty years and I'm thoroughly enjoying reading this book.

    When it comes down to essentials, people will choose the titles that they feel are most evocative of what they are trying to achieve for themselves. Some people embrace terms that others find offensive, some choose terms with similar meanings but which might be less commonly associated with negative stereotypes. In the gay and lesbian community, for instance, it has become quite commonplace for gays and lesbians to embrace terms that were meant to be derogatory, and then transform those terms into words of empowerment. It's tough to put another person down when they actively embrace the words that are used to try and hurt them.

    Mary Daly's book "Wickedary" and Judy Grahn's "Another Mother Tongue" are two other books that explore wordplay, language, and power with some explicitly Pagan perspectives. I'd recommend them to anyone interested in learning more about wordcrafting/spellcrafting. Language is power!
     
  4. The Mysterious

    The Mysterious The Mystical Shadow

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    I hope that it's that Witch and Wizard aren't the same.
    Heard any of The One Power? That what i've heard of Wizards being using.
    Witches use Witchcraft and is not the same art.
     
  5. bgruagach

    bgruagach eclectic Wiccan

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    Can you tell us where you heard these things? I've been practicing Wicca now for over twenty years, have read a lot about magick and occultism in general, and I can't say I'm familiar with these types of claims. I'm always eager to read up on what others have to say about magick and would appreciate knowing where to look for these particular ideas.

    Many occult writers say that magick is magick regardless who uses it or what they call themselves. There is an awful lot that is similar when we compare witches, wizards, magickians, or whatever titles people choose for themselves. The only real differences I've seen are with the philosophies that are expressed, terminology used, and labels people choose. What they actually do is not really that different.
     

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