Christianity: monotheistic or polytheistic?

Discussion in 'Comparative Studies' started by citizenzen, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    Fine thread! But (not being either a Mormon or a Trinitarian) is is always hard for me to believe three separate being as somehow being monotheistic. At least, unless one accepts the Smarta thesis of Hinduism (a belief sometimes called kathenotheism) wherein the veneration of more than one deity is acceptable as long as one realizes they are but one in the end. Then Hinduism and many other religions would be monotheistic (or at least partially so).
     
  2. soma

    soma New Member

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    Hinduism I feel their dieties are diverent perspectives of the same God. Similar to a chord where 3 notes make the same sound.
     
  3. radarmark

    radarmark Quaker-in-the-Making

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    Good comment, some, try looking up Smartha or Advanita, then follow on Google Scholar. If you want we could do PMs or you can start a thread in Eastern Religion.

    Hinduism (as I understand it) is rife with henotheistic beliefs (i.e., involving devotion to a single god while accepting the existence of others), or are but manifestation of the one divine power (a belief sometimes called kathenotheism, allowing for the veneration of numerous deities, understanding that all of them are but manifestation of the one divine power.

    Pretty close parallel to my ecumenical beliefs.
     
  4. exile

    exile Interfaith Forums

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    Pre-exilic Judaism was polytheistic (or henotheistic). Some have claimed the Shema as a strict monotheistic statement, but later in the same book that declares the Shema there are statements that imply to polytheism. Post-exilic books describe the strictest form of monotheism comparable to Haugs interpretation of Gathic Zoroastrianism. The Jews today don't practice original Judaism. They've either reinterpreted the nature of their god according to the interpretation of god in the intertestimenal books which they threw out, or by Christianity's interpretation of Judaism. Christians, Muslims, and Zoroastrians all venerate angels and saints, in addition to God, but they are all as monotheistic as each other, unless one considers Haugs argument for strict monotheism in the Gatahs: the Devil essentially being an abstract concept representing the negation of good. There are two arguments that can be made in regard to Christianity Islam and Zoroastrianism. That they describe a cosmic dualism and therefore not monotheism or God is really omnipotent, will defeat the Devil at the end of time, and therefore these are monotheistic religions.
     

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