The Forbidden Gospel

2ndpillar

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Hi 2ndpillar —

As you seem to reply on wikipedia, I found a page here First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia that deals with all the issues you raise.

I hope this will put your mind at rest.

Dear Thomas,
My mind, body, and Spirit are at rest. You need to be more specific than to just throw up a link against a wall when responding to a post. I sometimes reply with quotes from "Wikipedia", because it is an expedient source when participating on an internet forum, but I put the source in definite context. You asked for confirmation of Constantine's role in the foundational "faith" dogma of the Roman church, and I gave you that confirmation. Your response is to throw a link on the wall and give no foundation as to the point you are trying to make.
 

Thomas

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You asked for confirmation of Constantine's role in the foundational "faith" dogma of the Roman church, and I gave you that confirmation. Your response is to throw a link on the wall and give no foundation as to the point you are trying to make.
The link is self-explanatory — most of your assertions belong to the 'misconceptions' listed on the page.

If you want to understand the development of Christianity, might I suggest J.N.D. Kelly's "Early Christian Doctrines", and then "Creeds, Councils and Controversies". Kelly is required in scholarly circles.

Wikipedia is frowned upon.
 

2ndpillar

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The link is self-explanatory — most of your assertions belong to the 'misconceptions' listed on the page.

If you want to understand the development of Christianity, might I suggest J.N.D. Kelly's "Early Christian Doctrines", and then "Creeds, Councils and Controversies". Kelly is required in scholarly circles.

Wikipedia is frowned upon.

Dear Thomas,
Your listed "misconceptions" do not bring any new light. No one said Constantine formed the canon at Nicaea. The existing canon was compiled in 367 by Athanasius. It was the power of Constantine's Roman church, which gave Athanasius his soap box and "sainthood". Constantine died around 30 years earlier.

No one said that Constantine was baptized prior to the Council of Nicaea. This topic is not about the misconceptions of baptism.

As for the Trinity being a done deal, that was formalized after Constantine's death, but one of Constantine's decrees, which had anyone in possession of books of Arius burned to death, had a great influence on the outcome. You towed the line or you went up in smoke. It also gave a pathway for the Roman church to burn books and have the state burn people throughout history. The original version of Nicaea Creed formed the mainstay of "Christian" belief, and stated that Yeshua as of one "substance" with the Father. The "holy spirit" was added to the idea of "one substance" after Constantine's death. Constantine initiated the Council of Nicaea, and that creed formed the basis of "Christian" faith. The "Church" of the East, declared Constantine a "saint". Aren't you proud of a saint of the "Church", and glad to be associated with him and his deeds?

The Nicene Creed (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νίκαιας, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is the profession of faith or creed that is most widely used in Christianliturgy. It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity for most Christians.[1]
 
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