Using the Qu'ran to validate and integrate the Isha Upanishad and the NT

Discussion in 'Comparative Studies' started by Qu'otar, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. Qu'otar

    Qu'otar charlie

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    I think the Qu'ran can be used to validate the Isha Upanishad and lend it an interpretation that would direct the Isha Upanishad to lend some understanding of the mysteries of the Bible, also validated by the Qu'ran.

    The Qu'ran is the cryptographic key.
     
  2. Qu'otar

    Qu'otar charlie

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    The Isa Upanishad:

     
  3. Qu'otar

    Qu'otar charlie

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  4. Qu'otar

    Qu'otar charlie

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    Go, go Hiranyagarbha!!! :p
     
  5. Qu'otar

    Qu'otar charlie

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    So, let us look at the first verse of Isha Upanishad...

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    So, the core of Isha Upanishad that comes out from reading the other verses is that this talks of the path of knowledge, whereby one renunciates worldly aims. Later verses will talk of the path of action.

    This is reflected in the Qu'ranic ayat known as the Ayat Al-Birr, 2:177, which defines righteousness. Here is a great write-up of it. It does not name renunciation, but renunciation will fit this definition of righteousness.
    I think that the story of Jesus, from the Bible, demonstrates that he took the path of renunciation, the Highest Path.

    Thoughts?
     
  6. bhaktajan

    bhaktajan Active Member

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    I don't what to neglect this thread:

    Regarding Verse #1:

    Here is how Bhakti-vedanta Swami (1896-1977) explains this verse:

    Vedic knowledge is infallible because it comes down through the perfect disciplic succession of spiritual masters, beginning with the Lord Himself. Since He spoke the first word of Vedic knowledge, the source of this knowledge is transcendental.

    The words spoken by the Lord are called apauruṣeya, which indicates that they are not delivered by any mundane person. Vedic knowledge was originally imparted by the Lord into the heart of Brahma, the first created living being, and Brahma in his turn disseminated this knowledge to his sons and disciples, who have handed it down through history.

    Since the Lord is purṇam, all-perfect, there is no possibility of His being subjected to the laws of material nature, which He controls. However, both the living entities and inanimate objects are controlled by the laws of nature and ultimately by the Lord's potency. This Isopaniṣad is part of the Yajur Veda, and consequently it contains information concerning the proprietorship of all things existing within the universe.

    Because the Supreme Being, the Absolute Personality of Godhead, is the complete person, He has complete and perfect intelligence to adjust everything by means of His different potencies.
    He is the possessor of all potencies, the knower of everything and the benefactor of everyone.
    He is full of inconceivable opulence, power, fame, beauty, knowledge and renunciation.

    One should therefore be intelligent enough to know that except for the Lord no one is a proprietor of anything. One should accept only those things that are set aside by the Lord as his quota.

    The cow, for instance, gives milk, but she does not drink that milk: she eats grass and straw, and her milk is designated as food for human beings. Such is the arrangement of the Lord.

    Thus we should be satisfied with those things He has kindly set aside for us, and we should always consider to whom those things we possess actually belong.

    The standard of life for human beings cannot be applied to animals. The tiger does not eat rice and wheat or drink cow's milk, because he has been given food in the shape of animal flesh. Among the many animals and birds, some are vegetarian and others are carnivorous, but none of them transgress the laws of nature, which have been ordained by the will of the Lord.

    Animals, birds, reptiles and other lower life forms strictly adhere to the laws of nature; therefore there is no question of sin for them, nor are the Vedic instructions meant for them. Human life alone is a life of responsibility.

    The root of sin is deliberate disobedience of the laws of nature through disregarding the proprietorship of the Lord. Disobeying the laws of nature or the order of the Lord brings ruin to a human being.

    Conversely, one who is sober, who knows the laws of nature, and who is not influenced by unnecessary attachment or aversion is sure to be recognized by the Lord and thus become eligible to go back to Godhead, back to the eternal home.

    http://vedabase.net/iso/1/
     
  7. echos of grace

    echos of grace Interfaith Forums

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    I have always liked the first translation. There is an interesting twist in the Isa Upanishad.

    So far we have:
    Code:
    ignorance = blind darkness = overcome death = worship of unmanifest prakriti
    
    knowledge = greater darkness = immortality = worship of manifest deity
    Yet verse 14 states that worship of Hiranyagarbha (manifest deity) allows one to overcome death and devotion to unmanifest prakriti offers immortality. Why did the logic switch? 14 is saying:
    Code:
    overcome death = worship of manifest deity
    
    immortality = worship of unmanifest prakriti
    which is the opposite of what the 9 through 12 stated. Interestingly, 14 is talking about worshipping both the manifest deity and the unmanifest creation, so the worship becomes mixed and the results flip and so 2 is 1.

    Also interesting is that creation is unmanifest while deity is manifest, another mixture.

    What a great upanishad.
     

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