Save a Tibetan Monk - Urgent

Sacredstar

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Is it Ok to put this kind of request on this forum Brian?

Dear All

Please join me in taking action to save the life of Tenzin Delek, a Tibetan monk sentenced to death for crimes he didn't commit. Time is running out - he could be executed in December of this year. Please click on the link below to send a message to the Chinese government urging them to stop the execution. Thanks for your help.

http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/SaveTenzin?rk=2p1cuNn1gQcoW

Please distribute.

Love beyond measure

Sacredstar
 
Namaste SacredStar,


thank you for the post.

typically, a political post, such as the one above, would be more appropos in the political section of the forum.

however, seeing as this could spark an interesting conversation about the actions of the Red Chinese government and their policies towards organized religion that is not under State authority, i will leave it here.

for readers interested in the historical aspects of this political issue, i would suggest a visit to both of these sites:

http://www.tibet.com/ the Government of Tibet in Exile

and

http://www.savetibet.org home of the International Campaign for Tibet.
 
Dear Vajradhara

Thank you, can you tell us what this monk is accused of?

I received a prophecy a few years ago, that once the Chinese people set themselves free from bondage then Tibet would be free. Are there any signs of this in China? The last I heard was the problem of when the people with one of the ministers did Qi Kung (spelling?) ?

Love beyond measure

Kim xx
 
Namaste SacredStar,


thank you for the post.


The following statement was issued on April 14 by three fact-finding experts of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights:

We are deeply concerned over the situation of Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche, a prominent Lama who was involved in social work in favour of the Tibetan community in the Kardze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of the Sichuan Province and who promoted the reestablishment of Tibetan Buddhism in the region.

Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche was sentenced to death on 2 December 2002, after a trial that allegedly fell short of international norms and standards. His sentence has been suspended until 2 December 2004 and he remains in detention.

Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche was accused of "causing explosions" and "inciting the separation of the state", charges he denies. His co-accused, Lobsang Dondrup, was executed on 26 January 2003. Numerous and credible reports have referred to serious procedural flaws during Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche's closed trial, in particular: violation of the right to a public trial; violation of the right to chose his own lawyer; denial of the right to know and have the opportunity to examine the evidence presented against him in court; as well as incommunicado detention and ill-treatment during the pre-trial period.

We are concerned that Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche might be executed at any time upon the expiration of the suspension of his death sentence on 3 December 2004. We are similarly concerned at the alleged lapses in respect for human rights during the trial proceedings and urge the authorities to grant Tenzin Deleg Rinpoche a new trial ensuring respect for international norms and standards of due process.

The experts are:

The Special Rapporteur on the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Ambeyi Ligabo; The Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers, Leandro Despouy; The Special Representative of the Secretary-General on human rights defenders, Hina Jilani.

http://www.savetibet.org/News/News.cfm?ID=2441&c=6
 
a futher example, if you will indulge me:



(RFA) KATHMANDU, March 31, 2004-- "A team of Public Security Bureau officials of Taktse County, Lhasa City, secretly raided the room of Choeden Rinzen, a monk at Gaden Monastery located in the vicinity of Lhasa city, on Feb. 12, 2004," a Tibetan source who recently arrived in the Nepalese capital, Kathmandu, told RFA’s Tibetan service.

Sources inside Tibet who asked not to be named confirmed the refugee’s report. Phone calls during business hours to the Lhasa City Public Security Bureau and the Taktse County Public Security Bureau went unanswered March 30-31.

"In this raid, they first found a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and a Tibetan national flag. He was arrested immediately and taken away," the source said, adding that Choeden Rinzen was probably being detained in the Gutsa detention center outside Lhasa. "Nobody knows for sure his whereabouts, including his family members and monks of Gaden Monastery."

Police detained two of Choeden Rinzen's friends, identified only by their family names Tsuchung and Thargyal, at the same time but later released them and allowed them to return to Gaden Monastery, the source said.

Five days after the arrest, six Chinese police officers called a meeting of some 500 monks at Gaden, telling them that Choeden Rinzen had been arrested for "possessing anti-government materials," the source said. "They also informed the congregation of monks that he was involved in criminal activities and warned that if any other members of the monastery possessed a photo of Dalai Lama, they would face the same consequences."

Choeden Rinzen, who is in his early 20s, has been enrolled as a monk at Gaden since 1991. His father is a local government official in Medo Gongkar County, where Choeden Rinzen's birthplace, Thaya Township, is located.

The arrest preceded a crackdown at a local television station, Tibet Television 3, after it inadvertently showed footage of a man in Kathmandu with a Tibetan national flag behind him. The head of the station, a Tibetan, was questioned and forced to acknowledge his "mistake." Staff at the station were forced to undergo re-education and to write self-criticisms acknowledging their error.

Beijing has also recently outlawed a book, written by a Tibetan writer in Chinese, touching on sensitive religious issues, including how the exiled Dalai Lama is still revered by Tibetans inside Tibet. Author Oser found her "Notes on Tibet" essay collection banned after she tried to publish it in the freewheeling southern province of Guangdong.

According to the State Department’s 2003 report on human rights around the world, released in February, Chinese officials maintained last year that "possessing or displaying pictures of the Dalai Lama is not illegal." But it added that "pictures [of the Dalai Lama] could not be purchased openly in the [Tibetan Autonomous Region, or] TAR, and possession of such pictures has triggered arrests in the past; therefore, Tibetans in the TAR were extremely cautious about displaying them. Diplomatic observers saw pictures of a number of Tibetan religious figures, including the Dalai Lama, openly displayed in Tibetan areas outside the TAR." After an August 2003 incident in which presumed activists hung the banned Tibetan national flag from a radio tower, "private displays of Dalai Lama pictures were confiscated in urban areas of two Sichuan counties," the report said. Also in August 2003, five monks and an unidentified lay artist received sentences of 1 to 12 years' imprisonment for alleged separatist activities, including painting a Tibetan national flag, possessing pictures of the Dalai Lama, and distributing materials calling for Tibetan independence.

RFA broadcasts news and information to Asian listeners who lack regular access to full and balanced reporting in their domestic media. Through its broadcasts and call-in programs, RFA aims to fill a critical gap in the lives of people across Asia. Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA currently broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Mandarin, the Wu dialect, Vietnamese, Tibetan (Uke, Amdo, and Kham), and Uyghur. It adheres to the highest standards of journalism and aims to exemplify accuracy, balance and fairness in its editorial content. Please visit [url="http://www.rfa.org/"]www.rfa.org[/url] to learn more about RFA or to listen to RFA broadcasts.
 
Dear Vajradhara

Thank you for bringing me up to date, it breaks my heart to read such things. There will be an end to this control and domination.

I was given a mantra of conscious intent, a manifesto for peace and freedom is there a forum where this would be applicable?

Love beyond measure

Sacredstar
 
Namaste Sacredstar,


thank you for the post.

you could start a new thread here, as Mantras are, for the most part, an "eastern" thing :)
 
www.rfa.org
PLEASE SUPPORT THIS EXCELLENT SITE. I HAVE BEEN WITH THIS SITE FOR OVER THREE YEARS.
MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO OFFER SUPPORT FOR CHOEDEN RINZEN, please.

'Blue'


Vajradhara said:
a futher example, if you will indulge me:



(RFA) KATHMANDU, March 31, 2004-- "A team of Public Security Bureau officials of Taktse County, Lhasa City, secretly raided the room of Choeden Rinzen, a monk at Gaden Monastery located in the vicinity of Lhasa city, on Feb. 12, 2004," a Tibetan source who recently arrived in the Nepalese capital, Kathmandu, told RFA’s Tibetan service.

Sources inside Tibet who asked not to be named confirmed the refugee’s report. Phone calls during business hours to the Lhasa City Public Security Bureau and the Taktse County Public Security Bureau went unanswered March 30-31.

"In this raid, they first found a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and a Tibetan national flag. He was arrested immediately and taken away," the source said, adding that Choeden Rinzen was probably being detained in the Gutsa detention center outside Lhasa. "Nobody knows for sure his whereabouts, including his family members and monks of Gaden Monastery."

Police detained two of Choeden Rinzen's friends, identified only by their family names Tsuchung and Thargyal, at the same time but later released them and allowed them to return to Gaden Monastery, the source said.

Five days after the arrest, six Chinese police officers called a meeting of some 500 monks at Gaden, telling them that Choeden Rinzen had been arrested for "possessing anti-government materials," the source said. "They also informed the congregation of monks that he was involved in criminal activities and warned that if any other members of the monastery possessed a photo of Dalai Lama, they would face the same consequences."

Choeden Rinzen, who is in his early 20s, has been enrolled as a monk at Gaden since 1991. His father is a local government official in Medo Gongkar County, where Choeden Rinzen's birthplace, Thaya Township, is located.

The arrest preceded a crackdown at a local television station, Tibet Television 3, after it inadvertently showed footage of a man in Kathmandu with a Tibetan national flag behind him. The head of the station, a Tibetan, was questioned and forced to acknowledge his "mistake." Staff at the station were forced to undergo re-education and to write self-criticisms acknowledging their error.

Beijing has also recently outlawed a book, written by a Tibetan writer in Chinese, touching on sensitive religious issues, including how the exiled Dalai Lama is still revered by Tibetans inside Tibet. Author Oser found her "Notes on Tibet" essay collection banned after she tried to publish it in the freewheeling southern province of Guangdong.

According to the State Department’s 2003 report on human rights around the world, released in February, Chinese officials maintained last year that "possessing or displaying pictures of the Dalai Lama is not illegal." But it added that "pictures [of the Dalai Lama] could not be purchased openly in the [Tibetan Autonomous Region, or] TAR, and possession of such pictures has triggered arrests in the past; therefore, Tibetans in the TAR were extremely cautious about displaying them. Diplomatic observers saw pictures of a number of Tibetan religious figures, including the Dalai Lama, openly displayed in Tibetan areas outside the TAR." After an August 2003 incident in which presumed activists hung the banned Tibetan national flag from a radio tower, "private displays of Dalai Lama pictures were confiscated in urban areas of two Sichuan counties," the report said. Also in August 2003, five monks and an unidentified lay artist received sentences of 1 to 12 years' imprisonment for alleged separatist activities, including painting a Tibetan national flag, possessing pictures of the Dalai Lama, and distributing materials calling for Tibetan independence.

RFA broadcasts news and information to Asian listeners who lack regular access to full and balanced reporting in their domestic media. Through its broadcasts and call-in programs, RFA aims to fill a critical gap in the lives of people across Asia. Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA currently broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Mandarin, the Wu dialect, Vietnamese, Tibetan (Uke, Amdo, and Kham), and Uyghur. It adheres to the highest standards of journalism and aims to exemplify accuracy, balance and fairness in its editorial content. Please visit [url="http://www.rfa.org/"]www.rfa.org[/url] to learn more about RFA or to listen to RFA broadcasts.
http://www.rfa.org
 
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