'Living in the Now' takes a knock ...

Thomas

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New Scientist published some recent work on the brain's perception of 'now' and how the brain serves up 'the present moment'.

Regular meditators often claim that they live more fully or intensely in the present than most people. To test the claim, two groups, one meditators, one not, were asked to look at a drawing of a Necker cube, and press a button each time their perspective of it reversed.

Both groups perceived now to last about 4 seconds, seeming to confound the claims of some meditators. However, when participants were asked to hold a given perspective for as long as possible, the meditators managed 8 seconds on average, compared with 6 seconds for the others.

Meditators tend to score highly in tests of attention and working memory capacity. "If you are more aware of what is happening around you, you not only experience more in the present moment, you also have more memory content," said the Dr. running the experiments.

"Meditators perceive time to pass more slowly than non-meditators, both in the present and retrospectively," he said (my emphasis).

In fact when one experiences time slowing down, such as in an accident, it's because the brain increases the dataflow. Living in slow motion places a strain on the neurological resources and so the brain determines when to kick into overdrive, and when to cruise ...

There are good reasons to practice meditation, if only that by living more alertly, one lives more fully in an empirical sense ... but the idea that someone is more aware of the Real, is something of a nonsense. It's evident that whoever is living in whatever moment, it's a perception created by the rhythms and filters of the brain ...
 
The power of now is not meant to be taken literally, Thomas. The idea is minimize your dwelling on the scary future and the sad(or happy) past as both no longer exist. This can be used as a thought control mechanism. Nothing exist only the present (as minutes and seconds plus minus, we do not quibble over). So no it does not take a "knock" only if misunderstood.
New Scientist published some recent work on the brain's perception of 'now' and how the brain serves up 'the present moment'.

Regular meditators often claim that they live more fully or intensely in the present than most people. To test the claim, two groups, one meditators, one not, were asked to look at a drawing of a Necker cube, and press a button each time their perspective of it reversed.

Both groups perceived now to last about 4 seconds, seeming to confound the claims of some meditators. However, when participants were asked to hold a given perspective for as long as possible, the meditators managed 8 seconds on average, compared with 6 seconds for the others.

Meditators tend to score highly in tests of attention and working memory capacity. "If you are more aware of what is happening around you, you not only experience more in the present moment, you also have more memory content," said the Dr. running the experiments.

"Meditators perceive time to pass more slowly than non-meditators, both in the present and retrospectively," he said (my emphasis).

In fact when one experiences time slowing down, such as in an accident, it's because the brain increases the dataflow. Living in slow motion places a strain on the neurological resources and so the brain determines when to kick into overdrive, and when to cruise ...

There are good reasons to practice meditation, if only that by living more alertly, one lives more fully in an empirical sense ... but the idea that someone is more aware of the Real, is something of a nonsense. It's evident that whoever is living in whatever moment, it's a perception created by the rhythms and filters of the brain ...
 
It is a silly article. And the title of the article is misleading. Their study didn't test living in the now, it tested living in the real, whatever the heck that is supposed to be.

Living in the Now has nothing to do with living in the Real. I don't even know what 'living in the real' means! Nor do I see what meditation has to do with anything. Meditation is a form of mental cleansing. It is inwards focused, not outwards.
 
Changing the perspective is choice.... one can do it immediately or not at all depending on which they choose as their perspective...
 
Changing the perspective is choice.... one can do it immediately or not at all depending on which they choose as their perspective...

Wisely spoken, but to hold on to something requires strength, perspectives are effected by environment, and so maintaining a perspective could be a tough job with continuous changing environment.
 
Not indicating it is easy....but in almost every horrific event we find folks who do...

Viktor Frankl...

The Amish who forgave and prayed for those who attacked them....

we have amazing examples of how to do it...
 
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