Reality and Art

Discussion in 'Philosophy' started by Seer, Nov 20, 2020.

  1. Seer

    Seer Member

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    Can art mold reality? Do metaphors have power over our lives?
    You be the judge:

    A philosophical foray into the aesthetics of litter.

    We drum rules and perspectives into our children and as creatures of habit like us they adopt our values.

    A beach covered with litter provides more entertainment for children.

    [​IMG]

    Just-ice being an anathema to life and freedom in many cases, I think the examination of our motivations is fair. After all, if earthworms are responsible for the decline of the forests in the East(1) then the zealous would petition for their eradication rather than accept environmental change as their lot in the latitudes between Just-Ice and Just-Desert.

    (1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthworm#Environmental_impacts
     
  2. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    When it comes to litter and global climate change etc, it may be the other way around. Perhaps the children are teaching us?
     
  3. Seer

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    The hype surrounding climate change is tempered by the evidenced of coal seams and glacial deposits.
     
  4. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic)

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    How so? Can you give some reputable sources?
     
  5. Seer

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    Coal seams and glacial deposits are themselves reputable statement of the natural progression of climate changes.
     
  6. Cino

    Cino Big Love! (Atheist mystic)

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    Sure.

    Sometimes I speculate about future civilizations digging up the compressed layer of debris we are depositing right now...
     
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  7. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    Yes, it's going to be a layer of plastic. We are the plastic age. It's not in itself a bad thing; it's a very useful and essential material to our civilization
     
  8. Seer

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    It's an odd thing to see a stone path leading up to a front door become sunken. Is it really sinking into the soil I wonder or is the Earth's magnetic field attracting dust from space?
     
  9. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    The path's not sinking, the ground is rising? Wouldn't the space dust fall on the path as well as on the ground around it, lol?
     
  10. Seer

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    Hmm...well, there's got to be reasonable explanation why archeologists have to dig.
     
  11. RJM Corbet

    RJM Corbet God Feeds the Ravens

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    I know. So I googled it:

    https://www.straightdope.com/21341986/how-come-archaeological-ruins-are-always-underground


    “How come archaeological ruins are always underground? Think about it. Why isn't everything right on the surface? Where does this dirt come from that keeps burying the past? Is the Earth getting thicker and thicker, like the trunk of a tree? …”

    “… Physically, on the other hand, the earth is getting a bit thicker, since it picks up 10,000 tons of meteorite dust a year. But that’s not why ruins are buried.

    Archaeologists have to dig for lots of little reasons and one big reason. Sometimes the stuff they’re looking for was buried to start with, as in the case of graves and rubbish pits. Sites that are abandoned for a long time become overgrown with vegetation that gradually decays and builds up a layer of topsoil. Places located in valleys may get covered by erosion from nearby hillsides.

    Occasionally a site gets buried because of some natural disaster, such as a flood or the eruption that buried Pompeii. The great Egyptian temple at Abu Simbel (the one with the giant seated figures carved into a cliff) was partly buried by drifting desert sand. The same thing happened to the Sphinx — for centuries all that was visible was the head. The Roman port of Ostia was also engulfed in sand, which accounts for the remarkable state of preservation in which modern excavators found it …”

    etc …
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020

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