Current suppression of Baha'is in Iran

arthra

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August 03, 2022
Iranian Officials Restrict Movement Of Baha'is As Pressure Campaign Builds
08a40000-0a00-0242-7563-08da6f1c4311_w1023_r1_s.jpg

Three Baha'i women -- Shaghayegh Khanehzarin, Zhila Sharafi, and Negar Ighani -- were arrested in Shiraz in June.
The Iran Human Rights Organization says Iranian authorities have installed electronic tags on nine Baha'i followers and is restricting their movement in another sign the government is increasing pressure on the group.

According to the Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA), the nine Baha'i members are allowed to travel within a radius of 500 meters of their residence for 304 days, effective August 2.

The nine were previously sentenced to one year in prison on a charge of "propaganda activity against the system through the promotion of Baha'iism."

The move comes amid renewed pressure and harassment against the Baha'is, with security agents arresting dozens of Baha'i followers in recent weeks and raiding the homes of hundreds of others.

The representative of the Baha'i community at the United Nations, along with several human rights groups, say a number of Baha'i houses in the village of Roshankooh in northern Iran were destroyed while agricultural land of several other Baha'is in the village were seized.

This village, where most of the residents are Baha'is, previously has been the scene of attacks by government forces who destroyed many homes.

"Following the attack on Tuesday [August 2], more than 200 Iranian government agents gathered the Baha'is in Roshankooh village, and they took their cell phones to prevent filming," Simin Fahandej, the representative of the Baha'i community at the United Nations, wrote on his Twitter account on August 2.

According to this Baha'i representative, agents used "heavy equipment" to demolish the houses.

The HRANA website, which covers human rights violations in Iran, also confirmed the destruction of "the houses of six Baha'i families in Roshankooh village of Sari by government bodies."

"About 20 hectares of agricultural land of the residents of this village were also fenced off and occupied," HRANA added.

Confirming the destruction of houses in Roshankooh village, Salman Sattari, the regional governor, claimed these houses "were built outside an authorized area and some were built on national lands."

A source close to the Baha'i families denied the claim saying the lands have a "documented history of more than 70 years."

Baha'is -- who number some 300,000 in Iran and comprise an estimated 5 million followers worldwide -- say they face systematic persecution in Iran, where their faith is not officially recognized by the constitution.

Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has on several occasions called the Baha'i faith a cult and in a religious fatwa issued in 2018 forbade contact, including business dealings, with followers of the faith.

Since the Islamic Republic of Iran was established in 1979, hundreds of Baha'is have been arrested and jailed for their beliefs. At least 200 have been executed or were arrested and never heard from again.

Thousands more have been banned from receiving higher education or had their property confiscated, while vandals often desecrate Baha'i cemeteries.

With writing and reporting by Ardeshir Tayebi

https://www.rferl.org/a/iran-restricts-movement-bahais-/31972536.html
 

RJM

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It is horrible to hear this.
 
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I don't think anyone expects much religious tolerance within Iran or most other Islamic states?
 

badger

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August 03, 2022
Iranian Officials Restrict Movement Of Baha'is As Pressure Campaign Builds
08a40000-0a00-0242-7563-08da6f1c4311_w1023_r1_s.jpg

Three Baha'i women -- Shaghayegh Khanehzarin, Zhila Sharafi, and Negar Ighani -- were arrested in Shiraz in June.
The Iran Human Rights Organization says Iranian authorities have installed electronic tags on nine Baha'i followers and is restricting their movement in another sign the government is increasing pressure on the group.

According to the Human Rights Activists News Agency (HRANA), the nine Baha'i members are allowed to travel within a radius of 500 meters of their residence for 304 days, effective August 2.

The nine were previously sentenced to one year in prison on a charge of "propaganda activity against the system through the promotion of Baha'iism."
Hello Arthra.
Can you tell us what the three ladies were convicted of?
To reduce a one year prison sentence to ankle gating up to a few hundred metres from home is hardly a vicious sentence.
That happens here in the UK.

You mention that some Bahá'ís have built homes without planning permission ...an acquaintance of mine built his new house 11" higher than the permission given to the plans, he was ordered to take the whole building down after the inspector let him complete the roofing. He is an atheist and do I wonder if atheists ate being picked on on Kent UK?
 

badger

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I don't think anyone expects much religious tolerance within Iran or most other Islamic states?
I've heard that Jews living in Iran are allowed to live in peace as long as they keep to their religion quietly. It's said that Jews in Iran feel safer than if they would be in France.
 

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I've heard that Jews living in Iran are allowed to live in peace as long as they keep to their religion quietly. It's said that Jews in Iran feel safer than if they would be in France.
Khamenei does have it in for the Bahai. It's a bad situation for Baha'i in Iran, it seems. Many Iranian Baha'i are born into the faith, Iran is their home.
Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has on several occasions called the Baha'i faith a cult and in a religious fatwa issued in 2018 forbade contact, including business dealings, with followers of the faith.
@arthra
You and your gentle people are in my heart and prayers
 
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badger

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Khamenei does have it in for the Bahai. It's a bad situation for Baha'i in Iran, it seems. Many Iranian Baha'i are born into the faith, Iran is their home.
To reduce a one year prison sentence to tagging is quite humane, no?
As with us in the UK, Iran has a strict teaching plan for all minors. Over here our inspectors (like Iranian agents?) fine and close down schools which try to evade or change that plan.
 

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To reduce a one year prison sentence to tagging is quite humane, no?
As with us in the UK, Iran has a strict teaching plan for all minors. Over here our inspectors (like Iranian agents?) fine and close down schools which try to evade or change that plan.
Yes, but there is an overall movement against the Baha'i in Iran?
 
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RJM

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I don't know.
a religious fatwa issued in 2018 forbade contact, including business dealings, with followers of the faith.
Is this true?

Words from these Islamic leaders have power to incite persecution?
 

badger

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Yes, but there is an overall movement against the Baha'i in Iran?
Ever since the Bab broke away from Shia Islam in the early 19th century there have been Babis and Bahá'ís in Iran, and they are still there in hundreds of thousands. Yes, the Baha'i religion is curtailed but there has never been the genocide etc that has been claimed.
How much do you know about Baha'i?
I've kept right away from posting about Baha'i here, but just wanted to know more about the journalist, the press and the story on this thread.
 

badger

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Not much. Willing to learn and discuss
I lived with a Baha'i for 19yrs, knew Bahá'ís, know about Baha'i, know of the good honest Bahá'ís that got outlawed for writing too much about it.
But I'm out of this.....Aup knows as much or more than I do.
 
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I lived with a Baha'i for 19yrs, knew Bahá'ís, know about Baha'i, know of the good honest Bahá'ís that got outlawed for writing too much about it.
But I'm out of this.....Aup knows as much or more than I do.
Well, if we could start a reasonable thread, that tries to discuss facts and history? I don't know?
 

badger

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Well, if we could start a reasonable thread, that tries to discuss facts and history? I don't know?
My freedom to reply on another Bahai thread/subject was withdrawn, no reason given. I'll keep clear of Bahai subjects, I think?
 
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My freedom to reply on another Bahai thread/subject was withdrawn, no reason given. I'll keep clear of Bahai subjects, I think?
Ok. The subject seems to run to darker waters
 

Ahanu

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In Iran Baha'is are regarded as najes (ritually unclean or untouchable). Dogs and pigs are regarded as najes too. Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians are not regarded as najes.

Here's what Khamenei says:

Q 327: Please answer the following questions:
i. What is the rule for Muslim students intermingling and shaking hands with students belonging to the deviant Bahā’ī sect at the primary, secondary, and high school levels, irrespective of whether they are boys or girls, mukallafs or not, within or outside the school?
ii. What should be the behavior of the teachers vis-à-vis students who either declare that they are Bahā’īs or are known to be such?
iii. What is the rule pertaining to using things used by all the students, such as drinking-water taps, latrine taps, pitchers, soap, etc., knowing that the body and hands are wet?
A: All followers of the deviant Bahā’ī sect are considered najis and their coming into contact with something requires observing the rules of purity for matters in which the state of purity is required. But the behavior of the headmasters and teachers with Bahā’ī students should be in accordance with the regulations and Islamic ethics
Q 328: Please elucidate the duty of the believing men and women vis-à-vis the deviant Bahā’ī sect and the impacts that arise due to the presence of its followers within the Islamic society?
A: It is obligatory for all believers to counter the plots and corruption of the deviant Bahā’ī sect and to stop others from being misled by this deviant sect or following it.
Q 329: At times the followers of the deviant Bahā’ī sect bring us food or something else. Is it permissible for us to use them?
A: Any sort of social association with the deviant and misleading Bahā’ī sect should be avoided.
Q 330: A large number of Bahā’īs live in our neighborhood and often visit our home. Some say that the Bahā’īs are najis while others consider them as pure. These Bahā’īs also exhibit good morals. Are they najis or pure?
A: they are najis and enemies of your religion and faith. So you should beware of them, my dear friends.

 
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RJM

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In Iran Baha'is are regarded as najes (ritually unclean or untouchable). Dogs and pigs are regarded as najes too. Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians are not regarded as najes.

Here's what Khamenei says:


It's horrible
 

Tone Bristow-Stagg

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Well, if we could start a reasonable thread, that tries to discuss facts and history? I don't know?

I have found that reason is not usually pursued in such conversations.

It is indeed horrible and many around the world face such horrible suppression by the minds of wayward men.

Regards Tony
 

badger

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In Iran Baha'is are regarded as najes (ritually unclean or untouchable). Dogs and pigs are regarded as najes too. Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians are not regarded as najes.

Here's what Khamenei says:

I am a naji. My next door neighbours are najis. Our JW friends are najis. Our little dachshunds are najis (definitely....skanky little beasts).
Christians, Jews, Zoroastrians, Saytanists, agnostics, atheists and Buddhists are........najis.
We are not Shia Muslims.

Islamic law[edit]
According to the Shafi'i school of Sunni Islamic jurisprudence, as systematised by Al-Nawawi in his book Minhadj, the following things are najis: wine and other spirituous drinks, dogs, swine, blood, excrements, and the milk of animals whose meat Muslims are not allowed to eat. Spirituous drinks are not impure according to the Hanafi school, while living swine and dogs are not impure according to the Malikis.[1] There is a difference of opinion as to whether alcoholic drinks are najis.[2]

To the list of impure things enumerated by al-Nawawi, Shi’a jurists traditionally add dead bodies and non-believers.[1][3]
 

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_religion_in_Iran

... The Constitution of Iran stipulates that Zoroastrians, Jews, and Christians are the only recognized religious minorities.The continuous presence of the country's pre-Islamic, non-Muslim communities, such as Zoroastrians, Jews, and Christians, had accustomed the population to the participation of non-Muslims in society.

However, despite official recognition of such minorities by the IRI government, the actions of the government create a "threatening atmosphere for some religious minorities". Groups reportedly "targeted and prosecuted" by the IRI include Baháʼís, Sufis, Muslim-born converts to another religion (usually Christianity), and Muslims who "challenge the prevailing interpretation of Islam".

In 2020, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (ICRC) annual statement described the Islamic Republic as a country of particular concern under international law on religious freedom, and US Secretary of State included the Islamic Republic among the most egregious violators of religious freedom.
 
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