The value of having spiritual family or sangha for mental health

_Hermes_

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There are people in my life that I always feel like I need to tribute. I don't know if you have ever felt it, but there is a special feeling when you have a spiritual sangha or community. I relate to some of these people like some kind of spiritual family.

When I was in a therevadan buddhist temple before I also always had the sangha to fall back upon, some even called eachother brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts in a spiritual sense. It was the normal thing to do and it felt very right in that culture (which was the thai culture).

I sometimes miss that in western religious communities and I do still think of certain individuals like that. Maybe I'm just a eastern soul and this is my way of thinking about people. Or maybe there are more people that can relate to this in here?

Is there anyone else that have any thoughts on the subject?
 
Yes, I can relate. My own little group of spiritual misfits is something like my spiritual family. I believe that in any group of human beings, certain fixed roles and relationships will play out. I have a few cousins, aunts and uncles in the spirit, so to speak.
 
There are people in my life that I always feel like I need to tribute. I don't know if you have ever felt it, but there is a special feeling when you have a spiritual sangha or community. I relate to some of these people like some kind of spiritual family.

When I was in a therevadan buddhist temple before I also always had the sangha to fall back upon, some even called eachother brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts in a spiritual sense. It was the normal thing to do and it felt very right in that culture (which was the thai culture).

I sometimes miss that in western religious communities and I do still think of certain individuals like that. Maybe I'm just a eastern soul and this is my way of thinking about people. Or maybe there are more people that can relate to this in here?

Is there anyone else that have any thoughts on the subject?
I know what it's like to be disconnected from family and having friends become family.
Now that I see what you wrote I wish I were in a community where something along the lines of formalized or semi-formalized roles were the norm, that is, having someone become my aunt or uncle or grandparent again (Or become my sibling, niece or nephew)
 
I know what it's like to be disconnected from family and having friends become family.
Now that I see what you wrote I wish I were in a community where something along the lines of formalized or semi-formalized roles were the norm, that is, having someone become my aunt or uncle or grandparent again (Or become my sibling, niece or nephew)
Well I am in a community, but they don't know I view them in that way, even if I get such vibes.. It has just developed in that direction without anyone even speaking about it.. It's just something I reflected on now.. and maybe I just miss people pointing it out and are afraid that if I point it out it would become akward.. :p
 
Relationship status can be hard to talk about. But it can work to get into conversation about individual aspects. "I like how we meet on time" (commitment) or "I really enjoyed that afternoon, what was your favorite moment" (emotional closeness). Over time, people put one and one together in hheir heads, and might arrive at the same conclusion as you.
 
Thank you. I really value your answers.

#sociallyakwardbutterfly
 
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