In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful

InLove

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Hello,

Is this the way to greet one another, and how do I say it?
 
InLove said:
Hello,

Is this the way to greet one another, and how do I say it?
Salaam
Thank u for your question , the answer ....do ask about Hello ????
If so ...and if u ask about the greeting in Islam ,the answer is No ,Islamic greeting in Arabic Assalaamu alai kum ...and Muslim should answer " Wa Alai kum Al salaam wa rahmat Allah Wa Barakatho"
also i read that Jesus (PUH) used this greeting .."Greet you in the same manner as Jesus (pbuh) greeted in Hebrew Luke 24:36
‘Sholam alay kum’

both meaning ‘Peace be on you’.
I hope that I answered your question ...and If you have any other questions you are more welcome to ask .:)
 
This is quite a good question - for example, how much does Arabic vary between countries?

I remember once being taught that in Egypt the greeting is:

Salaam, alaikum

and the reply as:

Alaikum, Salaam.

Approximately meaning:

Greeting: Peace be upon you
Reply: Upon you be peace.
 
I said:
This is quite a good question - for example, how much does Arabic vary between countries?

I remember once being taught that in Egypt the greeting is:

Salaam, alaikum

and the reply as:

Alaikum, Salaam.

Approximately meaning:

Greeting: Peace be upon you
Reply: Upon you be peace.
Hi
you are right about the variation between Arabic countries
but i was reply according to Islamic teaching
In Arabic we have many words and sentences regards greeting ...sometimes it is different according to the time morning or evening , or according to the occasion.
here are some Arabic greeting sentences :
Sabah Alkaeer = good morning
Masa Alkaeer = good evening
Allah yafeek =God make you well
Marhaba and Halla = welcome
Ma Al Salaamh = with safety

.
.
.
But as i told you above ...all Arab countries use the Islamic greeting ( Al Salaamu alyckum) but practically not all muslims always use it they use many greeting words including this islamic greeting .
 
Ah, now that sounds like an interesting distinction - in other words, there are specific greetings that Muslims can use to greet one another, but that would not be right between secular Arabic speakers??
 
I said:
This is quite a good question - for example, how much does Arabic vary between countries?

I remember once being taught that in Egypt the greeting is:

Salaam, alaikum

and the reply as:

Alaikum, Salaam.

Approximately meaning:

Greeting: Peace be upon you
Reply: Upon you be peace.
h| Brian,
The islamic greeting is the one both you and friend quoted. The difference is only in the degree to which it is applied in speech. You used 'Salaam Alaikum' which is the shortest one. A higher degree of it is 'Salaam Alaikum wa Rahmatullahe' . Yet the highest one is 'Salaam Alaikum wa Rahmatullahe wa barakatuh.' Basically, it keeps adding on to it. The rule for the one who answers the greeting is that he should answer with the same or better degree.
If you say 'Salaam Alaikum', then i can answer by any of the 3 degrees. i.e.
'wa alaikum salaam' ;'wa alaikum salaam wa Rahmatullahe' ; 'wa alaikum salaam wa Rahmatullahe wa barakatuh'.
On the other hand, if you say 'Salaam Alaikum wa Rahmatullahe wa barakatuh' which is the highest form of greeting, then i can only answer by equalling it and saying 'wa alaikum salaam wa Rahmatullahe wa barakatuh'.

All meanings etc. can be found at:
http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/reference/glossary/term.ASAK.html
Hope this helps.
And Allah knows best.
 
Peace be upon you:), then!

Thank you, thipps, for the link--very helpful!

InPeace,
InLove
 
Salaam, alaikum,

Thipps, would you mind if I post your reply in a thread I started on the Comparative Studies board entitled "How We Greet One Another? Or, better yet, I'd love to have you visit personally (but I know you are busy, and don't know if time permits).

Hope you don't mind me asking...:)

Thanks,
InPeace,
InLove
 
InLove said:
Salaam, alaikum,

Thipps, would you mind if I post your reply in a thread I started on the Comparative Studies board entitled "How We Greet One Another? Or, better yet, I'd love to have you visit personally (but I know you are busy, and don't know if time permits).

Hope you don't mind me asking...:)

Thanks,
InPeace,
InLove
Wa'Alaikum salaam,
Yes you can use it but add the following to it as well. I forgot about it and it occured to me now.
There is an element of how the salaam is said that shuold also be considered.
If some says 'Assalaamu Alaikum'... he/she can say it in a regular tone but it can also be said with emotion to express happiness at meeting the person. In the first case, one can reply in the 3 manners I explained before... but for the second case, since the person said it with emotion, so if you simply reply "wa 'Aalikum salaam", then it should also be with emotion so that it is equal to the greeting made... otherwise you can reply by adding one or both of the extra phrases that were mentioned.
This is in accordance with what Allaah said in the Quran:
“When you are greeted with a greeting, greet in return with what is better than it, or (at least) return it equally” [Quran, 4:86]
Love is one of the duties of Islam and one of the pillars of the Islamic system. One should give salaams to those whom one knows and those whom one does not know, out of sincerity towards Allaah; one should not try to impress other people by giving salaams only to those whom one knows and no-one else. This also entails an attitude of humility and spreading the symbols of this ummah through the word of salaam [Al-Qaadi said in Ikmaal al-Mu’allim (1:276)]
And Allah knows best.
 
Wa'Alaikum salaam--

(Please forgive me if I still do not yet understand how best to do my greetings--I am trying.:) Maybe the "smiley" will help somewhat?)

Thank you for your permission--I will post your reply with credit to you. And I will also post what you said after about it, and I thank you so much.

I believe that the way we treat one another is very important, and if we can understand that from the beginning, then perhaps it helps us the rest of the way.

InLove,
InPeace
 
Salaam,
When we translate peace be on you it is equal to asalaam-o-alaikum in arabic and vice versa.I was shocked when the first time I saw this greeting in the bible

Luke 24:36While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, "Peace be with you."

Reference:http://www.biblegateway.com

I have yet to see any christians in chat rooms or forums who had use this greeting.
 
InLove said:
Wa'Alaikum salaam--

(Please forgive me if I still do not yet understand how best to do my greetings--I am trying.:) Maybe the "smiley" will help somewhat?)

Thank you for your permission--I will post your reply with credit to you. And I will also post what you said after about it, and I thank you so much.

I believe that the way we treat one another is very important, and if we can understand that from the beginning, then perhaps it helps us the rest of the way.

InLove,
InPeace
You answered correctly. You're doing just fine. by the way, if you want more material on the greeting and its significance, i can provide that as well. Just ask.
 
PluckyAli said:
Salaam,
When we translate peace be on you it is equal to asalaam-o-alaikum in arabic and vice versa.I was shocked when the first time I saw this greeting in the bible

Luke 24:36While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, "Peace be with you."

Reference:http://www.biblegateway.com

I have yet to see any christians in chat rooms or forums who had use this greeting.
wa'alaikum salaam,
no surprise there. Our Creator sent him and taught him the same greeting that was taught to Adam (pbuh).
 
Asalaam-o-alaikum,

(Still working on it:) ).

Very interesting observations, PluckAli and Thipps--I really love this conversation.

So, when I named this thread and asked my original question, I did not know what I now know (not that I know very much!) But am I correct in thinking that "In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful" is a heading that is used on all Islamic written documents? (I realize, of course, that this is the English translation. Can someone translate it here? Or I suppose I could be less lazy and look it up:) --I just like getting the info from folks I actually sort of "know".)

Anyway, if it is indeed used on written documents--is it only on sacred writings, or is it stated on other items, such as everyday correspondence?

Thanks, everyone for your patience and kind answers--and please, if you ever see me using Islamic terms in a wrong way, please make sure and let me know.:)

InPeace,
InLove
 
In many languages there are three kinds of "you".
One used with friends, children, relatives when you address one person ("thou" in old English).
Another one used in formal and polite speech when you address one person. One when you address several people.
Those two last forms are often identical.
So how are these two forms used in Arabic :
"as-salâmu `alayka" and "as-salâmu `alaykum" (not to mention the feminine and dual forms) ?
 
InLove said:
Asalaam-o-alaikum,

(Still working on it:) ).
Wa'Alaikum salaam,
Use two s's in the beginning so that it is written as: Assalaam-o-Alaikum. Makes for a better transliteration.
Very interesting observations, PluckAli and Thipps--I really love this conversation.

So, when I named this thread and asked my original question, I did not know what I now know (not that I know very much!) But am I correct in thinking that "In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful" is a heading that is used on all Islamic written documents? (I realize, of course, that this is the English translation. Can someone translate it here? Or I suppose I could be less lazy and look it up:) --I just like getting the info from folks I actually sort of "know".)

Anyway, if it is indeed used on written documents--is it only on sacred writings, or is it stated on other items, such as everyday correspondence?

Thanks, everyone for your patience and kind answers--and please, if you ever see me using Islamic terms in a wrong way, please make sure and let me know.:)

InPeace,
InLove
It is a starting point. To remember your Lord before you start something. I've seen it used here in saudi arabia on letterheads of university documents (no scripture whatsoever) & at the beginning of Masters & Doctoral theses even and yes ofcourse in the beginning of official/unofficial islamic books as well. We are taught even to say it before we start to eat, which is again to remember our Lord before we begin to eat; for no doubt, it is He who is The Sustainer, The Cherisher and The Provider of us all.
Hope this helped.
And Allaah knows best.
 
Assalammu Alaykum everyone! ;)

Back in my homeland, due to the long years of Ottoman influence, Muslims still use greetings among each other that are similar to those people use in Turkey. For instance we say:
a) Marhaba=hello
b) Sabah hayrulah= good morning
c) Aksham hayrulah= good evening
d) Allahimanet=God be with you (goodbye)

Since we attended religious schools we were taught to greet non-Muslims the way they greet each other. So we usually used 'secular' greetings with others in order not to offend them, but islamic greetings were very common :)
 
Assalaam-o-Alaikum! (I will just go with that for now--I added an "s") :)

And just so you know--Peace to All of You Here From My Heart--Praise be to Allah--

I am receiving so much great information from everyone--I do so very much want to include it in the thread in Comparative Studies--I want to make certain each time, however, that it is indeed okay to do so.

PluckyAli, Thipps, and Amica--thank you so much--have I missed anyone? And Mansio--good question there--maybe it could go on the other thread as well.

I think what I will do is this: I will prepare a post that combines my last few questions and your responses. Then I will post it here for your individual approvals? Would that work?

I will try and put that together in the next day or so (sometimes I work really slowly, and sometimes the everyday happenings of life interfere).

By the way, Amica--I think you have told me before that you live in the U.S.? Where is your original homeland? (Good to talk with you again:)).

InPeace,
InLove
 
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