That there is progress and the road leads somewhere

Discussion in 'Abrahamic Religions' started by dhisbrook, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. dhisbrook

    dhisbrook New Member

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    From a favorite of mine. Commentary welcome.

    Far too often the Cross is presented for our adoration, not so much as a sublime end to be attained by our transcending ourselves, but as a symbol of sadness, of limitation and repression... This ends by conveying the impression that the kingdom of God can only be established in mourning, and by thwarting and going against the current of man's aspirations and energies.

    In its highest and most general sense, the doctrine of the Cross is that to which all men adhere who believe that the vast movement and agitations of human life opens on to a road which leads somewhere, and that that road climbs upward. Life has a term: therefore it imposes a particular direction, orientated, in fact, towards the highest possible spiritualisation by means of the greatest possible effort. To admit that group of fundamental principles is already to range oneself among the disciples -- distant perhaps, and implicit, but nevertheless real -- of Christ crucified.

    - Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881 - 1955)
    French paleontologist and Jesuit priest
     
  2. Skeptic44

    Skeptic44 New Member

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    _____________

    Of course, it is noble and good to aspire to great things...

    but I don't understand the connection between...

    (a) human life leads somewhere and the road climbs upward

    (b) a man who claimed to be an exorcist died in agony on a cross after assaulting moneychangers in a Temple.

    If anything, the death of Jesus symbolizes many of the worst things about humanity, nad few of the noble ones.
     
  3. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Staff Member

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    Ah, Pierre de la Chardin again. :)

    Just in case it's of interest, there's another thread on him here.
     

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