Furqan

Discussion in 'Christianity' started by Gnostradamus, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. Gnostradamus

    Gnostradamus Member

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    There is a book called "The True Furqan" at http://www.islam-exposed.org/

    It was written by an Arab Christian named Al-Saffee and translated by another Arab Christian named Al-Mahdi.

    The book presents elements of the Gospel in a way so as to reach out to Arabic speakers and challenge the Quran in it's language style and eloquence.

    It is also claimed that Al-Saffee was "inspired" to write this book by the Holy Spirit, and that between the two of them (Al-Saffee and Al-Mahdi) they are the two witnesses in Revelations who will be slain in Jerusalem.

    What I would like to know is what opinions to Christians hold regarding this book?

    Would any of you consider it to be authentic holy scripture, or just a money spinning attack against Islam?
     
  2. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Admin

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    Havbe to admit, I've not heard of the book - but two points:

    1. I think Holy Scipture within Christianity has been pretty much canonised;
    2. There are plenty diatribes between religion, all motivated by various motivations, but powered by a sense of self-righteousness.

    To an outside observer, the fighting and critical attacks between religions are the least constructive forms of interfaith dialogie - starting from a position where one seeks to disprove the other's beliefs and prove them false is disrespectful - but there has been plenty enough good interfaith dialogue (and ecumenical) that works on the proposition of starting with a platform of generally shared ideas (there is God; observe the Golden Rule of ethics) and then see how long you stay within agreement, and where not, at least respect.
     
  3. Gnostradamus

    Gnostradamus Member

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    I pretty much agree with everything you said, but I wonder about the canonisation process.

    I agree that of the books that were available there aren't going to be anymore additions to the Bible, but does the Bible allow for the inspiration of new holy scriptures in our age?

    There have been a number of holy scriptures which have become the basis for new religions or offshoots of existing religions, I was wondering whether accepting the above mentioned book would put someone outside the fold of Christianity - or is there room for a modern Christian scripture that is theologically in agreement with mainstream Christianity?

    I haven't heard of any other new scripture claiming divine inspiration in our lifetimes, it's interesting to see whether this one will be absorbed by a part of Christendom, or take a life of it's own with a new religious following, or just simply fade away.

    There's certainly enough controversy surrounding this book in the muslim community to either see that it is suppressed or to give it a notoriety that will keep it permanently on the religious scene.

    We know what happened when people tried to keep the Bible away from the general public, it became the most widespread/published book on the planet.
     
  4. the_truth

    the_truth Peace!

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    I'm not a christian, but i've read a few parts from this book.

    This book is in response to the verses from the Qur'an that says:





    "And if ye are in doubt concerning that which We reveal unto Our slave (Muhammad), then produce a sura or the like thereof, and call your witnesses beside Allah if ye are truthful.And if ye do it not and ye can never do it - then guard yourselves against the fire prepared for disbelievers, whose fuel is of men and stones."

    Qur'an(2:23-24)





    So here, the Qur'an challenges anyone to produce a chapter like the Qur'an and it seems that these people have accepted this challenge.

    Personally,even though i'm not a christian, i think that, this book is not really, wound around money-making purposes.
     

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