Coffee Table Christianity?

Thomas

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The Illustrated Bible
A Swedish businessman has produced a glossy version of the Bible lavishly illustrated following a glossy magazine/coffee table format. With images "beautiful, violent, oblique and provocative", he hopes to cash in by offering a known text in a different format.

Other versions of Scripture include:
The Manga Bible
The Bible as manga.

The Bible in Cockney
Rewritten in rhyming slang.

The Geordie Bible
Rewritten in the vernacular of a region in the North East of the UK.

The Brick Testament
Bible scenes made out of Lego.

From the BBC website

Thomas
 
I just lol'd....

I am so buying the cockney one. That is freaking awesome lol....

And jesus said.... "av a butchers at this me ol china... This geezer lazarus went up the apples and pears to heaven, and lucky I was ere, the guvna..." lol *goes and buys* (oh that wasn't a clip from the book that was my imagination tickling me...)

FOUND A CLIP! lol...

Jesus asked, "How much grub have you got? Go an' 'ave a butcher's." They told 'im, "We've got five loaves of Uncle Fred and two Lillian Gish."
Jesus then told his disciples to ask all the people to get into groups and sit dahn on the grass.
Jesus then took the Uncle Fred and the Lillian Gish. He broke the Uncle Fred into bits, gave it all to his disciples and told them to give some food to everyone. He also broke the Lillian Gish into bits and told his chinas to pass it on.
Now, would you Adam and Eve it, everyone 'ad enough to eat!
 
Ever since and before King James folks wanted to have 'their version'. Now to some it may be subversion or an aversion, but spreading Christianity is a money makin venture...just consider the value of the land every church and cathedral is on can't flip over the money changers any more.

But I say have at it...any way you can get anyone to develop an interest and then maybe get them to look a little further is valuable...you all know I am not about converting and saving, but getting folks to take personal responsibility and the books can do that as well...

bt Jss sed 'gen, "chldrn, how hard it iz 2 entR d kingdom of God! It iz EZer 4 a camel 2 go Thru d eye of a needle thN 4 a :-$$$ mang 2 entR d kingdom of God."
"w mang DIS iz impossible, bt not w God; aL tngz R posebL w God."
 
I know some may see it as offensive/insult.... Or just to make profit... But hey, there is fun in it also.... And great way to spread the news ;) I think I would like a Devon/Cornish Bible... I might have to work on it myself though :s that would take some time lol.....

I think we should see the light side of it :)

I know I wasn't too fond on the bible titled.... "Jesus Loves Porn Stars." But I feel that is a different kettle of fish to this lol.
 
For advocates of many forms of Christendom it can be atmusing and even inspiring but it is not Christian. It is just an expression of Christendom and of the same value as any other secular work. It can also serve to remind people of the diference between the two which could be a saving grace.
 
I don't care if anyone (dis)agreed with me, but I think such 'news' make us remember once more that christianity stopped to be something serious for people. Look at that! Who in Islamic or Buddhist countries will dare afford Qaran of Lego!!? He'll lose his head from shoulders among Muslims. Mikaeel Jackson will do it himself (I mean cutting necks)!!! :) But here we just have fun when see such an unusual Lego...
 
For advocates of many forms of Christendom it can be atmusing and even inspiring but it is not Christian. It is just an expression of Christendom and of the same value as any other secular work. It can also serve to remind people of the diference between the two which could be a saving grace.
Exactly what the Catholic Church said about Protestants I believe.
 
Not alot of Jesus Christ Superstar fans on this forum then lol...

One thing has nothing to do with the other. I've even played the score of JC Superstar as part of a band and enjoyed it. The trick is to remember it is just an expression of the Great Beast having nothing to do with the intent of Christianity.
 
You are loooooving "the great beast" phrase right now huh? lol....

Of course it has something to do with it.... It takes the story from the bible... And changes it to a different tone and approach... Hence... It is like these bibles...
 
I can't help but wonder if this thread was begun as a subtle commentary on having the Bible available in vernacular?

Just because one could write the Bible in Pig Latin doesn't mean it should be.

At the time of the earliest English translations a part of the impetus was the desire to throw off the oppressive shackles suppressing the laity. No doubt there was political currency gained when Henry VIII started his own church, but the Protestant drive to throw off the highbrow oppressors predated even that. I mean consider: the Mass and other religious ceremony was conducted in Latin, which only royalty, priesthood and extremely wealthy could afford to be educated in to understand. Which meant that the uneducated masses were at the mercy of the upper crust and priesthood to tell it to them straight...a privilege shown time again to have been abused.

So the Protestant masses desired a Bible in the vernacular in order to be able to read it for themselves...and thus conclude that certain "Papal additions" were indeed not Biblically founded. An example would be the practice of indulgences.

My point being, having a Bible available in a language suitable for study is one thing...it opens the way to have the beautiful lessons within come alive on a very real and personal level. But if the purpose is just another translation for fun and financial profit, I am inclined to believe the motivation is amiss.
 
..Just because one could write the Bible in Pig Latin doesn't mean it should be....My point being, having a Bible available in a language suitable for study is one thing...it opens the way to have the beautiful lessons within come alive on a very real and personal level. But if the purpose is just another translation for fun and financial profit, I am inclined to believe the motivation is amiss.
wiki lists over a hundred english translations... Modern English Bible translations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I believe most translations had to do with either profit or control. Modifying text to meet the needs of whoever commissioned the publisher...this includes the first ones made into english.

As much anime stuff my son likes to read, I believe the manga bible may interest him. And if there were a contingent of folks that preferred piglatin as their language of choice..maybe one should be written in that too.
 
Hi Juantoo —

I can't help but wonder if this thread was begun as a subtle commentary on having the Bible available in vernacular?
Not directly — Someone at work pointed out the news item, so I thought I'd post it ...

Just because one could write the Bible in Pig Latin doesn't mean it should be.
My thoughts too. I think the difference lies between 'is there a need' and 'is there a buck to be made here' ...

At the time of the earliest English translations a part of the impetus was the desire to throw off the oppressive shackles suppressing the laity.
An idealistic part, perhaps, but (having not researched it) I don't buy it. I am inclined to think that's more a propaganda whitewash after the event. In my view, the common people were no better off after the Reformation, and in some aspects worse.

Does having the Bible in the vernacular set the people free? I'm not sold on that one. That a reforms were needed, I do not argue. That publishing the Bible in the vernacular would achieve that, I don't see how.

No doubt there was political currency gained when Henry VIII started his own church, but the Protestant drive to throw off the highbrow oppressors predated even that. I mean consider: the Mass and other religious ceremony was conducted in Latin, which only royalty, priesthood and extremely wealthy could afford to be educated in to understand. Which meant that the uneducated masses were at the mercy of the upper crust and priesthood to tell it to them straight...a privilege shown time again to have been abused.
I think it's pretty well proven that the reformation in England was all about the king getting a divorce — it was not about introducing Protestant ideas (Henry was an opponent of that).

At his death, the emerging aristocracy saw their chance and, the Duke of Northumberland, acting as Regent, set about a series of Protestant reforms that upset a lot of people, including Parliament (he amassed considerable personal wealth via 'the Dissolution of the Monasteries'). He tried to engineer a declaration of illegitimacy against Mary and Elizabeth, to favour Lady Jane Grey as queen, to whom he had married his son, when it was clear Edward had contracted TB. Mary beat him to it, and Northumberland lost his head.

Really, religion was a distraction to mask the political intent of the main players ... it was a sideshow to deflect blame and recrimination ...

So the Protestant masses desired a Bible in the vernacular in order to be able to read it for themselves...
I really don't think they did? I think people like to insist they did, but I'm really not sure. Remember the 'Protestant masses' were 'Catholic masses' before they were told they were Protestants by those who came to power. The people never had the choice, for example, to say which side they would favour.

And history also shows they did not embrace the new Protestant theologies with any great love.

and thus conclude that certain "Papal additions" were indeed not Biblically founded. An example would be the practice of indulgences.
Whilst I agree the system of indulgences was open to abuse, and was abused, the practice of praying for the dead is biblically founded, and indeed is part of Jewish Tradition, as it was part of the Christian.

A 'proof' is not in Scripture, but in the interpretation of Scripture ... that's my point. The Protestant Reformers proclaimed sola scriptura in the face of tradition, but that did not mean, nor allow, personal interpretation. They replaced one tradition of authority with their own.

My point being, having a Bible available in a language suitable for study is one thing...it opens the way to have the beautiful lessons within come alive on a very real and personal level. But if the purpose is just another translation for fun and financial profit, I am inclined to believe the motivation is amiss.
Agreed.

Thomas
 
It sits firmly in this concerted drive to try and re-introduce religious thinking into mass UK culture. The great dumb-down into superstitious dogma is being pimped like some cheap whore in every way. From the spooky crap of 'apparitions', with ever so cute and nice and 'trustable' Martin Shaw, to "Hello" bibles, to pseudo-science being vomited out as scientific fact. In every area the corporate media is trying to make people believe in nonsense once again. It is a sad sad sad regression that I can only hope fails.

tao
 
The Illustrated Bible
A Swedish businessman has produced a glossy version of the Bible lavishly illustrated following a glossy magazine/coffee table format. With images "beautiful, violent, oblique and provocative", he hopes to cash in by offering a known text in a different format.

Other versions of Scripture include:
The Manga Bible
The Bible as manga.

The Bible in Cockney
Rewritten in rhyming slang.

The Geordie Bible
Rewritten in the vernacular of a region in the North East of the UK.

The Brick Testament
Bible scenes made out of Lego.

From the BBC website

Thomas

"The Bible: a book that either reads us or is worthless." Chazal

I don't see how one of these modern bibles could read us.
 
It sits firmly in this concerted drive to try and re-introduce religious thinking into mass UK culture.
Sheesh, Tao, you've got it bad!

Bearing in mind the constant assault on faith schools, the constant ridicule of religion in the media, the laws that try and force Christians to act against their moral values, the admission by the BBC of an anti-religious bias... I'm not quite sure where this 're-introduction' is coming from.

The great dumb-down into superstitious dogma is being pimped like some cheap whore in every way.
The only dumbing-down I'm aware of is secular. We get criticised for refusing to dumb down. Pope Benedict speaks out against dumbing down more than any other topic.

From the spooky crap of 'apparitions', with ever so cute and nice and 'trustable' Martin Shaw...
A while ago I lamented that, on TV, the only portrayals of the religious were of people with serious, and often criminal, problems. Apparitions (I think, I haven't seen it) actually bucks that trend. But fear not, it'll take a lot more than Martin Shaw to re-establish Christianity here!

to "Hello" bibles, to pseudo-science being vomited out as scientific fact.
I've seen no science, nor pseudo-science, that supports a traditional biblical viewpoint. All I seem is endless religious programs offering alternatives the received wisdom — Muslim Jesus, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Gospels, Mary Magdalene, etc. — but I do agree they are for the most part tripe, sadly lacking in any theological or philosophical rigour, but evidence of the secular dumbing down why, like yourself, I decry.

(On the 'Muslim Jesus' program, the makers failed to mention that whilst much was made of the miracles attributed to the infant Christ in the Moslem tradition — of speaking from the moment of his birth, and turning clay sculptures into living birds — as evidence of a Muslim insight into the nature of the Incarnation, those same stories had been disproved and discounted as late apocryphal inventions by Christians generations before Mohammed was born. Sadly, it appears no-one informed him of that fact.)

I will accept that that bag of execrable tripe, The DaVinci Code, actually instigated some genuine interest in Opus Dei, but then not everyone is ready to believe that murderous albino monks stalk the corridors of our religious houses.

In every area the corporate media is trying to make people believe in nonsense once again. It is a sad sad sad regression that I can only hope fails.
If by nonsense you mean religion, rather than material consumerism, then the phrase 'same world, different planet' springs to mind. I really don't see it.

Lordy, Tao, I hope, should aliens ever land, both you and I are out that day, otherwise they'll go back with a markedly skewey picture of this place!

Thomas
 
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