Transfiguration

lunamoth

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Shall we pitch our tent
On this mountaintop
You and I
And stay here ‘till
The last light fades?

Shall we be safe
And cling tight to this rock
As the wind
Churns the valley below
And the seas go dry?

Shall we stay
On this crag
Glory on our face
Silence in our heart
And silence below?

Or shall we descend
Shall we go
Back down
To the rumble and crumble
Where hands grasp?

Shall we go down
By rocky path
By thorn and blood
And enter in
The hungry throng?

Shall we return
To home, to warmth
To earthen smells
Clay pots
That never fill?
 
Thank you wil. :eek:

Interesting though, Jesus said no, no, no and yes, yes, yes

'Course, the end of the story is not as bleak as the end of my poem.
so true...I often contemplate the monastic life...but then think that I was sent to 3d to learn, and you can't learn if you avoid now then can you...yeah, we've got to learn to be in this world but not of it...

again thanx for the contemplation...btw don't you owe us a report from another thread?
 
so true...I often contemplate the monastic life...but then think that I was sent to 3d to learn, and you can't learn if you avoid now then can you
Oh Wil, sometimes you talk utter nonsense ...

Thomas
 
Transfiguration


During Jesus’ transfiguration, Moses and Elijah also appeared “with glory.”
(Lu 9:30, 31; Mt 17:3; Mr 9:4)


It had been foretold that Jehovah would raise up a prophet like Moses, and that promise was fulfilled in Christ. (De 18:15-19; Ac 3:19-23)


There were many similarities between Moses and Jesus, such as: Babes were killed at their births, though they themselves were spared (Ex 1:20–2:10; Mt 2:7-23);


both were raised up by God in the interests of true worship and to effect deliverance (Ex 3:1-10; Ac 7:30-37; 3:19-23);


they were each privileged by God to mediate a covenant with his people (Ex 24:3-8; Heb 8:3-6; 9:15);


both were used by Jehovah to magnify his name
(Ex 9:13-16; Joh 12:28-30; 17:5, 6, 25, 26).



It was also foretold that Jehovah would send Elijah the prophet, among whose works was that of turning persons of Israel to true repentance.

While Jesus was on earth, John the Baptizer did a work of that kind and served as the Messiah’s forerunner, fulfilling Malachi 4:5, 6. (Mt 11:11-15; Lu 1:11-17)



But, since the transfiguration occurred after the death of John the Baptizer, Elijah’s appearance in it indicates that a work of restoration of true worship and vindication of Jehovah’s name would be associated with the establishment of God’s Kingdom in the hands of Christ.






they both experienced fasts of 40 days’ duration
(Ex 24:18; 34:28; De 9:18, 25; Mt 4:1, 2);





 
so true...I often contemplate the monastic life...but then think that I was sent to 3d to learn, and you can't learn if you avoid now then can you...

Oh Wil, sometimes you talk utter nonsense ...

Thomas
And this time I was profound? I doubt that is what you are saying but I would prefer if you'd be a little less obtuse. Or maybe I wasn't clear.

What I am saying is many times over the years I've contemplated delving into religious studies to the nth degree...spending days on end in contemplation and meditation, living meagerly, communing with G!d in a more continuous nature. vs. working the 9-5, living in the world, going to movies, paying mortgages, saving for retirement, raising children, etc...

And as I tried to intimate...I am on this earthly plane I feel for a reason...and that is to absorb all it has to offer, the good, the bad, the ugly (my perceptions) and gain a connection as well.

So that to you is utter nonsense? Which part and why?



afterword: thanx alex, if I hadn't walked away from the above composition before sending it and read yours I would have saved myself some time.
 
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So that to you is utter nonsense? Which part and why?
The assumption is that the monastic life is an avoidance of reality.

The underlying assumption is that your way is the only valid way. Because the monastic life is not for you — it is not for me either — does not render that life invalid, inadequate, or an avoidance, just different.

It's a matter of vocation, and values.

Thomas
 
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