G20 Londres/London/Londinium

Tao_Equus

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....will a Global scale money printing exercise do anything real?
Regulation stop our wage slavery?
Giving the IMF yet more leverage over developing economies advance social justice?
Will the culprits behind this robbery ever be named and brought to task?
And who is really going to pay for it all?
 
I was impressed with the speeches by President Obama and Prime Minister Gordon Brown:

BBC NEWS | Business | G20 leaders seal $1tn global deal

Global response to the crisis is a good and positive thing I think..and it may well be the one thing that will speed a recovery as opposed to what happened when the nations retreated into protective tariffs and tight money during the Great Depression. BUt as a Baha'i I've been thinking globally long before this..

- Art:)
 
... will a Global scale money printing exercise do anything real?
Does anyone really know?

Regulation stop our wage slavery?
Sadly I think wage slavery is a by-product of consumerism ... so not until people realise the issue of consumerism will they realise the other. As the UK is one of the most consumer-oriented countries in the world (we count highest in the possession of mobile phones per head of population, for example) that doesn't look like changing soon, and no government is going to stand on an agenda that people don't want.

Giving the IMF yet more leverage over developing economies advance social justice?
Protectionism is the order of the day. The only advantage governments offer is that we can vote governments out. Organisations like the IMF exemplify the tendency of bureaux to replicate themselves, whilst distancing themselves from all accountability (of course, the Civil Service is the bureau that runs the Government as its sounding board and flak jacket — in one respect, there's absolutely nothing funny about "Yes, Minister" ... )

Will the culprits behind this robbery ever be named and brought to task?
Unlikely, not since the media has surrendered its birthright to the Rupert Murdochs of this world. Investigative journalism has given way salacious rumour-mongering.

And who is really going to pay for it all?
We are, of course!

Thomas
 
So far, thank God, the G20 Summit has been without the bloodpath forewarned by the Met Police who, I think, we're just doing a bit of up-front PR and who, more to the point, exist precariously close since the Thatcher era to enforcing the will of the state, rather than defending the rights of the people.

The 'summer of discontent' prophesied by a police spokesman, in response to the crash and credit crunch, chills me. At what point do we find ourselves, the most heavily monitored and watched population in the western world, the subject of all those technologies employed 'against terrorism'? Technologies that, despite every claim from those who know, including two former heads of MI5, that they achieve nothing of any real value?

Am I perhaps getting a bit old and a bit paranoid in thinking that what worries governments the most is their own people who see through their lies and duplicity, and not the enemy-of-the-day?

The media, of course, who have been hinting at carnage all along. Hinting at, or hoping for? I'm waiting for an apology for the lack of mayhem from an on-the-spot reporter, "sorry, we're doing our best, but the people here simply don't want to start a fight."

The police practice of 'corraling' demonstrations into a closed area, the standard technique employed, is technically a form of 'arrest' and as such, no warrant nor reason being evident (demonstrating is not itself illegal) — the police are actually guilty of an illegal act.

That point seems to have been missed by the media pundits.

The breaking of the windows of the RBS Bank is a case in point. If you get the chance to see it again, have a look. Please notice the man trying to prevent the vandalism, "this is a peaceful demonstration!" — but please also count the number of press photographers clicking away. There seem to be more journos than demonstrators, or could it be that the journos have gathered and are inciting the mob to violent and 'photogenic' acts? Certainly, if we argue that this is nothing special, but average, then journalists must form at least 30-40% of the total number present, if not more like 60-70%.

A police spokesman said that when the films of the events are examined, arrests will be made. I do hope journalists and paparazzi are in the first haul.

Certainly, I think we are poorly led by our politicians ... as a comedian said recently, the public sector is well-meaning, and usually wrong, whilst the private sector (beloved of recent governments) is greedy, and usually wrong" — better well-meaning incompetence than self-serving incompetence.

But the media is neither incompetent nor well meaning, and they do serve us, in my book, very badly indeed, and they are part of the reason why governments are as bad as they are, is that the media decides who the next government is, not the people.

Thomas
 
. At what point do we find ourselves, the most heavily monitored and watched population in the western world, the subject of all those technologies employed 'against terrorism'? Technologies that, despite every claim from those who know, including two former heads of MI5, that they achieve nothing of any real value?


The police practice of 'corraling' demonstrations into a closed area, the standard technique employed, is technically a form of 'arrest' and as such, no warrant nor reason being evident (demonstrating is not itself illegal) — the police are actually guilty of an illegal act.

That point seems to have been missed by the media pundits.

But the media is neither incompetent nor well meaning, and they do serve us, in my book, very badly indeed, and they are part of the reason why governments are as bad as they are, is that the media decides who the next government is, not the people.

Thomas
agree...agreee...agree... I was at a world bank demonstration in DC once...just missed the brigade and being stuck in the corral... I was on the outside watching in amazement...it happened litterally in seconds...the police with their shin guards, face masks, plastic shields all came out of multiple buildings multiple doorways in unison and cordoned off two city blocks in a halftime marching band method...if it wasn't so scary I would have admired the precision.
 
Obama always reminds me of a preacher when he speaks.

Words, words, words, and apparently a whole lot more "money" to the IMF. Where is this "money" coming from? Is it generated by speeches, by the G20 meeting itself, or what? By sweatshop labor? By sanctions against "uncooperative countries"?

Gordon Brown held forth with some of the standard bullying flourishes of the patriarchy: "We have agreed tough standards and sanctions for use against those who don't come into line in the future," Mr Brown said, speaking of a handful of small countries who "had not made any commitment to respecting international standards". Of course, it's easy to respect the standards when you get to make them. It's also equally easy to name small countries that really have no weight or responsibility in fixing the broken economy, compared to the U.S. or Britain, and talk about how they need to shape up. Such hypocritical passing of the buck is tiresome.

I mean, isn't the IMF part of the problem, along with the so-called World Bank? What's Costa Rica got to do with it, or the Philippines, or Uruguay, or Malaysia?
 
"He said it sounded the death knell for the freewheeling Anglo-American way of banking and conducting financial markets."

Well, if that's true, the death knell is welcome. Music to my ears.
 
Pathless,

I'm with you on the preacher bit, he also often takes 500 words to say what he could say in 50. Both seem deliberate techniques, well honed and delivered with a natural expertise. Yet from what I have seen so far that is all we have, presentation. I am still very undecided on him.
 
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