The Curriculum of Elementary and High Schools in the West

Discussion in 'Ancient History and Mythology' started by mojobadshah, May 13, 2011.

  1. mojobadshah

    mojobadshah Interfaith Forums

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    I think we're just going to have to agree to disagree. I think that party and tribe can be used interchangeably, tribe and nation can be used interchangeably, and party and nation can be used interchangeably (when there are other nations involved).[/QUOTE]

    Not at all, but I can see the effect that the topics they and the media chose to emphasize (Greek culture, Roman culture, English culture) and the topics they didn't choose to emphasize or which they portrayed in a negative light made people so full of themselves, totally blind-sighted, and has placed them in kind of state of denial.

     
  2. bob x

    bob x New Member

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    If you want to speak your own private language, don't expect to be understood. English-speakers use "political party" for a particular concept.
    Exactly. Don't be that guy.
    But the cultural influence persisted for thousands of years. There is no point in spending much time on Alexander's personal biography (nor do I recall much time being wasted on it in school), but the event was much more important historically than the transitory influences of the previous empires.
    Compulsory submission to the local community's religion is not "freedom". That system of "local theocracy" is a legacy from Cyrus to the Middle East, which is absolutely poisonous in my view, and totally opposite from what you like to pretend it was.
    And has been, continually, for two thousand years. To understand the references that are made in literature from 100 years ago or 500 years ago or 1000 years ago, you need to know about Homer. You don't need to know anything about the Gathas to understand Western literature, because they are never mentioned.
    They were SLAVIC speakers. How many times do I have to tell you that?
    What's not to understand here? Afghans don't like either Americans or Russians running their country-- why not? Because they're not Afghans!
     
  3. mojobadshah

    mojobadshah Interfaith Forums

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    If there was a tribe that shared the same political ideals I would have no problem accepting this tribe as a political party and I guess even a nation, but I accept you're definition.

    But there are SO MANY of that guy on a personal level and on the macrolevel.

    You're just degrading the importance of the Cyrus' accomplishments. The way I knew it. Up until Xerxes the Persians were very embracive of other cultures and they themselves took on some of these foreign practices. Cyrus restoring idols to their rightful places, permitting the Jews to return to Jerusalem and funding their temple, allowing conquered peoples to worship freely without having their places of worship desecrated. All these things were what helped the Persian Empire to grow.

    I repeat, NOBODY (apart from maybe academia) knows anything about what you're talking about. Everything they know about about Homer is through Homer. The concepts that originate with the Gathas are utilized in institutions an have influenced the entire Christian and Muslim world and even the Jews.

    The Sarmations were not Slavic speakers. But I would like to bring up at this point something I mentioned earlier which I have to rephrase because I didn't convey my question correctly. Don't you think its weird that Gathic is almost identical to Sanskrit and Sanskrit is very similar to Lithuanian part of the same language subfamily as Slavic and the Slavs may have according to my sources arose where many of the Slavs did. In the Ukraine, Russia, Serbia, Croatia, Czechoslovakia, and Poland.
     
  4. bob x

    bob x New Member

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    The members of a football team might, coincidentally, share political beliefs, but that doesn't mean "football team" and "political party" are synonyms.
    Which is why I wish you wouldn't be another.
    This communal freedom of religion is important to the history of Middle Eastern politics, where that still remains the system in many places: you are born into (have no individual freedom to change) a religious group which governs many aspects of life. In the long run, it has not been a good legacy, in my view; it certainly has nothing to do with the American system.
    YES THEY WERE!
    ??? Why would I think it "weird" in any way that Iranian and Indic, which are geographically close, are also linguistic next-of-kin? Together they form the Indo-Iranian group.
    ??? Why would I think it "weird" in any way that Indo-Iranian and Balto-Slavic, whose areas were geographically close and in some places overlapping, are also linguistic next-of-kin? Together they form the S'atam group.
    You must have meant to say something other than "Slavs arose where Slavs did". The Slavs arose in Ukraine (where they were under the overlordship of Iranian-speaking Scyths for a time) and in Russia (where no Iranians ever were present); but not in Serbia or Croatia (no Slavic speakers until the 8th-century invasions of Serbs and Croats who previously lived on the Volga), nor in Czechoslovakia or Poland (no Slavic speakers in Roman times; it is not certain when there started to be, but I am attributing it to Huns expelling Sarmatians northward from Hungary).
     
  5. bob x

    bob x New Member

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    Addendum on Scot/Scyth/Sogdian:

    An important town in Albania is Shkoder, anciently called Scutari, with similar names appearing elsewhere in the Balkans or northwest Anatolia, evidently from Illyrian origin. There is no good etymology for the name (lots of "folk etymologies", that is, inventive stories which only serve to illustrate that nobody knows). It occurs to me, however, that perhaps the Latin cognate is schola, "group of like-minded people" (source of English school) and that the root may have originally referred more to a philosophical/religious fellowship than to ethnic affinity.
     

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