Progressive Revelation...

Discussion in 'Belief and Spirituality' started by wil, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    What Jewish Christians are we talking about? Just trying to get clarity on who and when ...

    I have no idea who you mean by 'Jewish Christians' and 'Catholics that Islam resurrected'? Are you talking of a particular timeframe, or historical moment?
     
  2. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    No. According to Johannes van Oort, Jerome also thought it was a mere question of language. But Johannes van Oort goes on to write about a Jewish Christian named Elchasai, who started a Jewish Christian sect I hinted at earlier when I mentioned Mani's Jewish Christian background:

    The author concludes:


    I am not sure what you mean by "Christians believe Christ to be the Son of God." Let's not collapse that term (Son of God) into one meaning. What do you mean by Son of God? Perhaps you can elaborate. The Clementine Homilies, a Jewish Christian work, says the title is purely symbolic - a notion any Catholic would find heretical.


    For these Jewish Christians, Jesus was "called by God His Son" "in the waters of baptism" (R 1.48). For them, the True Prophet is single, but has multiple manifestations . . .

    See above for cited examples.

    Authors of the Jewish Christian works I cited above as an example. We are still on that merry-go-round debate . . . that Islam resurrected, are we not? Historical moment? The appearance of the Prophet Muhammad. This person seems to be familiar with Jewish Christian communities . . .
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018
  3. Ahanu

    Ahanu Well-Known Member

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    Now let's jump into what Henry Corbin said when he linked Jewish Christian Christology with Islamic thinking. Pay attention to what he says about the Holy Spirit:

     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018
  4. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    OK ... This thread started as a discussion of Progressive Revelation, and has moved far away from that, and as you say, this merry-go-round can go on and on. I think I've made my position clear.

    As to the gender of the Holy Spirit: I know of no theological treatise proposing the gender of the Holy Spirit. As for the references above, they seem to be discussions of the Hebrew. Origen, for example, learned Hebrew to read the texts, but the comments referenced are actually his arguments against the gender-orientation of the Spirit.

    As for Corbin — again you're talking a very individualist view.

    The Greek Patristic view of the Holy Trinity avoids the question of gender because there is the inevitable fall into anthropomorphism. The Trinity is defined way beyond that, into an understanding of the ontology of being.

    "The life of the Trinity has no need of outside participation. This must be stressed from the start. It is perfectly self-sufficient. There is something very essential in the fact that God is total fullness of being, and therefore exhausts totally within Himself the totality of what is, so that He needs nothing else. Otherwise he would not be God. There would be an imperfection in Him. And one of the things that we must seek tranquilly to understand in God is this fullness, this total perfection and self-sufficiency. Here is something in which our spirits and our hearts can rest and take comfort, for we ourselves suffer cruelly from the limitations, failings and imperfections all around us. (pp. 51-2)"
    Jean Danielou, God’s Life in Us.

    "... when we speak of the Holy Trinity we must always see its mission as an extension of eternal relations. All things are first accomplished in God. The Trinity is the expression of God’s life in its perfect self-sufficiency. The mission is a sort of radiation or reflection in the created world of what is first accomplished perfectly and wholly in God Himself."
    Ibid.

     
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