How Socratic Intellectualism Side-Steps the Is-Ought Problem

Ella S.

Well-Known Member
Messages
703
Reaction score
537
Points
88
Location
United States
According to Socrates, the wise will do good simply by virtue of their knowledge and wisdom.

Initially, this is a notion that confused me, but now I think I'm beginning to understand it.

Even if we came up with a "bad actor" who desired nothing but to benefit themselves, through proper wisdom they would realize that they would find peace and happiness in giving up vices like greed and pride. In learning to be content with oneself, which is part of being wise in the sense used by Socrates here, one no longer relies as much on external things for that contentment.

This side-steps the is-ought problem because it is applicable to pretty much all individuals and their drives.

Even in the case of those who are pathologically antisocial and said to be lacking a conscience, this causes disorder and suffering in their lives directly due to their unwise behavior. Specifically, people who are pathologically antisocial often complain about being continuously bored, and a high percentage become addicts chasing fleeting highs. Treatment for these individuals often includes pointing out how destructive that behavior actually is, leading to them realizing that they do not need to behave antisocially to be happy and recognizing the self-destructive consequences of behaving immorally.

And, at last, I've been freed of the existential confusion that the is-ought gap has created in me for over half a decade.
 

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
According to Socrates, the wise will do good simply by virtue of their knowledge and wisdom.

Initially, this is a notion that confused me, but now I think I'm beginning to understand it.

Even if we came up with a "bad actor" who desired nothing but to benefit themselves, through proper wisdom they would realize that they would find peace and happiness in giving up vices like greed and pride. In learning to be content with oneself, which is part of being wise in the sense used by Socrates here, one no longer relies as much on external things for that contentment.

This side-steps the is-ought problem because it is applicable to pretty much all individuals and their drives.

Even in the case of those who are pathologically antisocial and said to be lacking a conscience, this causes disorder and suffering in their lives directly due to their unwise behavior. Specifically, people who are pathologically antisocial often complain about being continuously bored, and a high percentage become addicts chasing fleeting highs. Treatment for these individuals often includes pointing out how destructive that behavior actually is, leading to them realizing that they do not need to behave antisocially to be happy and recognizing the self-destructive consequences of behaving immorally.

And, at last, I've been freed of the existential confusion that the is-ought gap has created in me for over half a decade.
With wisdom of experience, nowadays if I’m unjustly or thoughtlessly unkind to someone, it bothers me so much mentally that it’s easier just to be nice, lol. So many past thoughtless words and actions that I wish I could go back and change. There’s the justification that at the time I didn’t know the hurt I was causing – so in a sense I was blameless of conscious wrongdoing – but that doesn’t change the damaging effect it had upon the innocent, or that my inner higher-self being should have known …
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: wil

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
upload_2022-7-13_11-47-25.png
 

wil

UNeyeR1
Moderator
Messages
23,178
Reaction score
2,658
Points
108
Location
a figment of your imagination
With wisdom of experience, nowadays if I’m unjustly or thoughtlessly unkind to someone, it bothers me so much mentally that it’s easier just to be nice, lol. So many past thoughtless words and actions I wish I could change. There’s the justification that at the time I didn’t know the hurt I was causing – so in a sense I was blameless of conscious wrongdoing – but that doesn’t change the damaging effect it had upon the innocent, or that my inner higher-self being should have known …
The Butch of this revelation is that 20 years hence we repeat it again as we advance to new understandings of our impact.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RJM

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
The Butch of this revelation is that 20 years hence we repeat it again as we advance to new understandings of our impact.
The Tibetan Buddhist precept is live/work for the happiness of all beings. I'm far from that yet, lol
 
Last edited:

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
In some way truly, love is the highest wisdom, in the divine knowledge that all things are one, so whatever hurt I put out, returns upon myself?

But as a natural being I have to kill to live, even by breathing in tiny living creatures in the air. It is the symbol of Man, both natural and spiritual, crucified between the heavens and the earth?
 
Last edited:
Top