Neurodivergency

wil

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From another thread
realisation that I had autism spectrum disorder. Sometimes I wonder if it was because of all of that meditation that I just suddenly ended, or if it was due to work?
Simply contemplating life changes, situational changes and brain changes.

Are we stuck with our diagnosis?

Are these brain variances fluid?
 
From another thread
Simply contemplating life changes, situational changes and brain changes.

Are we stuck with our diagnosis?

Are these brain variances fluid?
Great questions, I don't know.. I don't really care, but sometimes when you only experience all the negatives of the diagnosis you tend to ponder on such questions, they say the gutneurobiome has something to do with autism.. who knows?
 
My neurodivergence is something I was born with. I think neurodevelopmental conditions are fixed, as compared to mental illness, which can be more fluid. My condition is called NVLD and it’s similar to autism, though more rare. My brain is literally different from those without the condition. I’m stuck with it sadly haha.
 
I wonder what Covid did for our mental health. In the UK, the government kept saying how Covid could affect our mental health. It almost felt, like the government was giving us permission to almost self diagnose, if we weren't feeling well, it must be mh, we need therapy.

We might be stuck with stuff in our heads, but the power comes from understanding we have choices. We can get on with life despite all the stuff that goes on.
 
I wonder what Covid did for our mental health. In the UK, the government kept saying how Covid could affect our mental health. It almost felt, like the government was giving us permission to almost self diagnose, if we weren't feeling well, it must be mh, we need therapy.

We might be stuck with stuff in our heads, but the power comes from understanding we have choices. We can get on with life despite all the stuff that goes on.
I think there was a lot of focus on the negative, though its understandable why that would be.

I had no change in my situation when Covid hit. I was already isolated(and hating it). I became a little bitter when all the sudden the world found themselves lonely, I was supposed to care. No one cared when I was; I was just told to "suck it up, Buttercup". Well, back at ya. I felt terrible for those experiencing health issues, but was indifferent to the mental pains regarding the change and solitude the pandemic brought.

Actually, for a month or so, my husband was home. I had another adult around. It was really nice. I feared the children being home; two of the three have disabilities, and I thought I'd be in over my head. In reality, the middle one became verbal(that was unexpected), and my oldest thrived at virtual school(for the first year, he burned out by the second). We continue to homeschool the younger two. There's just more that I can do for them at home.

But, there's nothing wrong with therapy, if one has access to it. I do think its a little sad, though, that now you 'hire a life coach'. What a person used to do is 'make friends', but that seems to have changed, at least in my pocket of the world.
 
I wonder what Covid did for our mental health. In the UK, the government kept saying how Covid could affect our mental health. It almost felt, like the government was giving us permission to almost self diagnose, if we weren't feeling well, it must be mh, we need therapy.

We might be stuck with stuff in our heads, but the power comes from understanding we have choices. We can get on with life despite all the stuff that goes on.
I feel like that is very dismissive of people that deal with trauma. Not everyone has developed healthy coping skills and therapy teaches healthy coping skills. Why should we flounder in the dark not knowing how to deal with stuff when there are people trained to provide skills.
 
We are all "stuck" with something .. it is more a matter of degree, when it comes to mental health.

That's true. But I think people with neurodevelopmental conditions have it a bit harder in the way we are stuck. We're trying to operate in a world not set up for brains like ours. And mental health issues are quite different than conditions like NVLD and autism.
 
That's true. But I think people with neurodevelopmental conditions have it a bit harder in the way we are stuck. We're trying to operate in a world not set up for brains like ours. And mental health issues are quite different than conditions like NVLD and autism.
I'm living with a person with epilepsy right now. I never realized all the struggles that exist for someone with that condition...
 
But, there's nothing wrong with therapy, if one has access to it. I do think its a little sad, though, that now you 'hire a life coach'.
I have not had a very positive experience with counselling in the past. I went with a friend who needed help, she had to wait several months for the first appointment, and had different counsellors each time. I was very conscious they were clock watching. Whilst it was free, I am not sure how helpful her experience was.

What a person used to do is 'make friends', but that seems to have changed, at least in my pocket of the world.
I see this as a sadness now. In the past, there seemed to be wider family ties, with grandparents, cousins, aunts uncles, in laws. I think sharing things together and doing things together is powerful. We are fortunate to have our children and grandchildren a few minutes walk away, sharing family meals together, brings us closer. Sadly, family bonds seem more watered down today.

The internet is almost isolating people today, we can have conversations with people we will never meet. I don't think this is very healthy substitute for real friends in our neighbourhood.
 
I feel like that is very dismissive of people that deal with trauma. Not everyone has developed healthy coping skills and therapy teaches healthy coping skills. Why should we flounder in the dark not knowing how to deal with stuff when there are people trained to provide skills.

The idea with therapy, is the hope someone else can help solve our problems. When we walk away after a session, we still own our problems ,no one else can solve them for us. Sometimes, just being able to talk openly with someone, helps to share the burden.

Many years ago I called on a customer, she said, if I tell you something, will you promise not to tell anyone. Having known her for a few years, I thought she was going to tell me some gossip, and agreed. She said she was about to end her life as I was knocking on her door. She described what she had started to do. This seemed like a carefully planned and determined attempt to end her life, but she still chose to tell me about it.

She told me her story, some of which I already knew, she said that everyone who was important to her in her life had used her. Her husband ran off with another woman, her business partner ran off with the assets, and her children only came to see her when they wanted something. Then another man did a terrible thing, there was no chance of getting justice, so she decided to end her life. My response was to say that dying is not the problem, we all die. But you are a kind and caring person, you do not want to leave this world feeling bitter and angry. I talked about finding some way to forgive this person, because it was not in her nature to be bitter and angry. I said, even if you continue trying to end your life in the way you described, try and forgive this man. You are a kind and caring person and it is not in your nature to leave this world an angry and bitter woman.

There came a point when she had said all she could, and there was no more I could say, other than its pointless coming back next month to see you. She said come back. I could not stop thinking about her and phoned her when I got home, she said you never phone me, just come back next month like you normally do. When I went back the following month, she’d had her kitchen decorated and was planning a holiday. She never mentioned suicide again. It seemed sad, that she had no friends or family that she could have shared her worries with.

I knew I had left her with a terrible burden, every day she would have to live with the memory of the hurt, and strive to overcome her loss. Letting go of anger, and striving to forgive, helped this lady find a purpose to keep living. I have had similar conversations with many suicidal and self harming people.

I find it very hard after listening to these deep and troubling stories, that I have to walk away, knowing they still carry the burden. I have no mental health training, but I am learning to listen.
 
I have not had a very positive experience with counselling in the past. I went with a friend who needed help, she had to wait several months for the first appointment, and had different counsellors each time. I was very conscious they were clock watching. Whilst it was free, I am not sure how helpful her experience was.
I've had a counsellor on and off for 20 years. Why so long? I won't bore you with my life story, but I've had some difficult circumstances. It's been helpful, sometimes to just hear the voice of another adult who will talk.
I see this as a sadness now. In the past, there seemed to be wider family ties, with grandparents, cousins, aunts uncles, in laws. I think sharing things together and doing things together is powerful. We are fortunate to have our children and grandchildren a few minutes walk away, sharing family meals together, brings us closer. Sadly, family bonds seem more watered down today.
And your family is fortunate you're willing! My parents aren't too far, but not present. My mother is completely uninterested in her children or grandchildren. My dad is willing to toss money at activities, but is too invested in his own interests to spend too much time with them. He'll take one out to a meal now or again and babysit if there's a doctor's visit.

I always love hearing about active grandparents. :)
The internet is almost isolating people today, we can have conversations with people we will never meet. I don't think this is very healthy substitute for real friends in our neighbourhood.
I have mixed feelings on this. Is the internet isolating people? Yes. But it brings people together when there are no other options. Sometimes you don't have anyone nearby, and sometimes you're in circumstances that don't allow you to just walk out and meet people.

I had no internet and few friends for most of my 30s. Once I got the internet, I still didn't have any friends nearby, but now I had people all over the world that I could talk to. It didn't cure the loneliness. But it did ease it.
 
I'm living with a person with epilepsy right now. I never realized all the struggles that exist for someone with that condition...
I had epilepsy when I was young and got my autism diagnosis recently, so I know both struggles. I probably got a bit of alexiathymia also, have a hard time to interpret my own feeling or rather it takes a lot of contemplation and I use music as a way to understand my feelings.. strangely enough I have learned to read body language very well and are very high functioning in communicating with others, my special interests are except religion and spirituality/esoterics, growing things/cooking, martial arts and clothing ( creative stuff in general, shape, colours, sounds and smell)
 
I had epilepsy when I was young and got my autism diagnosis recently, so I know both struggles. I probably got a bit of alexiathymia also, have a hard time to interpret my own feeling or rather it takes a lot of contemplation and I use music as a way to understand my feelings.. strangely enough I have learned to read body language very well and are very high functioning in communicating with others, my special interests are except religion and spirituality/esoterics, growing things/cooking, martial arts and clothing ( creative stuff in general, shape, colours, sounds and smell)
We have a lot of the same interests. :)
 
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