Hallelujah

mee

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Hallelujah

What comes to your mind when you hear the term "Hallelujah"? Perhaps it reminds you of Handel's "Messiah," a musical masterpiece from the 1700's that features the dramatic Hallelujah chorus. Or you may think of the famous American patriotic song "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," also known as "Glory, Hallelujah." Surely, from one source or another, you have heard the word "Hallelujah." Perhaps you even use it from time to time. But do you know what it means?
Hallelujah—The English transliteration of the Hebrew expression ha·lelu-Yah´, meaning "praise Jah," or "praise Jah, you people."
Jah—A poetic shortened form of the name of God, Jehovah. It appears in the Bible more than 50 times, often as part of the expression "Hallelujah."
 
Hallelujah

What comes to your mind when you hear the term "Hallelujah"? Perhaps it reminds you of Handel's "Messiah," a musical masterpiece from the 1700's that features the dramatic Hallelujah chorus. Or you may think of the famous American patriotic song "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," also known as "Glory, Hallelujah." Surely, from one source or another, you have heard the word "Hallelujah." Perhaps you even use it from time to time. But do you know what it means?
Hallelujah—The English transliteration of the Hebrew expression ha·lelu-Yah´, meaning "praise Jah," or "praise Jah, you people."
Jah—A poetic shortened form of the name of God, Jehovah. It appears in the Bible more than 50 times, often as part of the expression "Hallelujah."

Hi Mee,
The Hallelujah Eurythmy exercise is used successfully with children before bedtime. Each of the sounds become movements.

The word Hallelujah itself means”I purify myself of all that prevents me from beholding the Divine”.

Blessings,
Br.Bruce
 
Hallelujah

What comes to your mind when you hear the term "Hallelujah"? Perhaps it reminds you of Handel's "Messiah," a musical masterpiece from the 1700's that features the dramatic Hallelujah chorus. Or you may think of the famous American patriotic song "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," also known as "Glory, Hallelujah." Surely, from one source or another, you have heard the word "Hallelujah." Perhaps you even use it from time to time. But do you know what it means?
Hallelujah—The English transliteration of the Hebrew expression ha·lelu-Yah´, meaning "praise Jah," or "praise Jah, you people."
Jah—A poetic shortened form of the name of God, Jehovah. It appears in the Bible more than 50 times, often as part of the expression "Hallelujah."

It is an expression, nothing more, nothing less. Jehovah, does not come to mind when the term is used (by most people). They don't care what God's name is; only that He is...

I'll tell you something personal. I hate the name "Jehovah". It does not do God a service. All it does is cause strife, and discontent, of which some folk seem happy to contribute to.

"El' lohim"...now that is a name worthy of God, not some B*stardized version of "Ya' weh" (YHWH).

Forgive me Mee. I've been gone a while, and when I come back, you still seem to be stuffing JW dogma down the throats of the members...

not very Christian...

v/r

Q
 
Forgive me Mee. I've been gone a while, and when I come back, you still seem to be stuffing JW dogma down the throats of the members...

not very Christian...

v/r

Q
or even the bible
psalm 83 ;18
That people may know that you, whose name is Jehovah,​
You alone are the Most High over all the earth.
 
I

"El' lohim"...now that is a name worthy of God, not some B*stardized version of "Ya' weh" (YHWH).



not very Christian...

v/r

Q
When applying to Jehovah, ’Elo·him´ is used as a plural of majesty, dignity, or excellence. (Ge 1:1) Regarding this, Aaron Ember wrote: "That the language of the O[ld] T[estament] has entirely given up the idea of plurality in . . . [’Elo·him´] (as applied to the God of Israel) is especially shown by the fact that it is almost invariably construed with a singular verbal predicate, and takes a singular adjectival attribute. . . . [’Elo·him´] must rather be explained as an intensive plural, denoting greatness and majesty, being equal to The Great God."—The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures, Vol. XXI, 1905, p. 208.

In many places in the Scriptures ’Elo·him´ is also found preceded by the definite article ha. (Ge 5:22) Concerning the use of ha·’Elo·him´, F. Zorell says: "In the Holy Scriptures especially the one true God, Jahve, is designated by this word; . . . ‘Jahve is the [one true] God’ De 4:35; 4:39; Jos 22:34; 2Sa 7:28; 1Ki 8:60 etc."—Lexicon Hebraicum Veteris Testamenti, Rome, 1984, p. 54; brackets his.
.............. going on the info above i would agree that Elo.him is a suitable word to discribe Gods majesty, but of course that is not his personal name.
 
Hallelujah

What comes to your mind when you hear the term "Hallelujah"? Perhaps it reminds you of Handel's "Messiah," a musical masterpiece from the 1700's that features the dramatic Hallelujah chorus. Or you may think of the famous American patriotic song "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," also known as "Glory, Hallelujah." Surely, from one source or another, you have heard the word "Hallelujah." Perhaps you even use it from time to time. But do you know what it means?
Hallelujah—The English transliteration of the Hebrew expression ha·lelu-Yah´, meaning "praise Jah," or "praise Jah, you people."
Jah—A poetic shortened form of the name of God, Jehovah. It appears in the Bible more than 50 times, often as part of the expression "Hallelujah."
Oh, I didn't realize it was OK to give God a "nick name" (lol)

"Hi, my name is Yahweh, creator of all...but you can call me 'Yah' for short..."

Originally it was Haleluyahwah...or Haleluyaha...

v/r

Q
 
Oh, I didn't realize it was OK to give God a "nick name" (lol)

"Hi, my name is Yahweh, creator of all...but you can call me 'Yah' for short..."

Originally it was Haleluyahwah...or Haleluyaha...

v/r

Q
The single syllable Jah is usually linked with the more moving emotions of praise and song, prayer and entreaty, and is generally found where the subject theme dwells upon a rejoicing over victory and deliverance, or where there is an acknowledgment of God’s mighty hand and power.
 
The single syllable Jah is usually linked with the more moving emotions of praise and song, prayer and entreaty, and is generally found where the subject theme dwells upon a rejoicing over victory and deliverance, or where there is an acknowledgment of God’s mighty hand and power.

There is no syllable "Jah" nor letter equivelant of "J" in Hebrew (no dipthong pronounced as "J"). There is no "V" in Hebrew, nor in Aramaic. Hence, Yahweh, is not Jahweh, or Jehovah (then again Ieshua is not Jesus either, and Yacov (f) is not Jacob.

Finally, the first time God gave His name, He said "Tell them 'I Am' sent you", not 'Yahweh' sent you. Therefore, it seems that God's prominant first name is 'I Am'. First person form of to be...
 
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