"Thou Sayest"

Eclectic Mystic

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OK, so when did "thou sayest" somehow come to mean "Yes. It is as you say"? What if I think it means something more like "That's your way of putting it"?

Anyone got the horse's mouth Greek? Or will you remain silent on this one too?
 
I'm not sure in what context you are phrasing this. I'm going on the assumption that you are referencing the trial proceeding of Jesus before the High Priest:

"But Jesus held his peace, And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God.
Jesus saith unto him, Thou hast said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.
Then the high priest rent his clothes, saying, He hath spoken blasphemy; what further need have we of witnesses? behold, now ye have heard his blasphemy." - Matthew 26:63-65

From what I've heard, when the High Priest adjures one to answer, that person is under obligation under the Jewish law to answer truithfully. The response Jesus gives, "Thou hast said" is a colloquialism of that day that is in the affirmative. An equivilent response is found in the parallel passage in Mark 14:61-63, "...Again the high priest asked him, and said unto him, Art thou the Christ, the Son of the Blessed? And Jesus said, I am: and ye shall see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven. Then the high priest rent his clothes, and saith, What need we any further witnesses?"

Here it is the very definite answer, "I am".
 
Or will you remain silent on this one too?

lol... The hells does this mean? It's like you've come out of nowhere and just picked a fight with noone but anyone lol...

An also let's not look at Greek? (Latin....), let's look at the correct and real translation language... Hebrew... So where about's in the Bible are we looking here? Give me a line and I'll try to translate it.
 
Good answer. Also, could Jesus have been referring to the high priest's prophecy concerning himself?
John 11:49-53 said:
And one of them, named Caiaphas, being the high priest that same year, said unto them, Ye know nothing at all, Nor consider that it is expedient for us, that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not. And this spake he not of himself: but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for that nation; And not for that nation only, but that also he should gather together in one the children of God that were scattered abroad. Then from that day forth they took counsel together for to put him to death.
 
"Legos don't speak"... Yea, guys, I get what you're saying already. But I must be the smart ass. Oh and if you're not familiar enough with the book to follow along then please feel free not to participate. This thread wasn't intended for lukewarm Christians.

Now, as a change of pace, how about my OP question: How did "Su lego" eventually become "Yes. It is as you say"?
 
hi eclectic mystic

first and foremost i apologize for not knowing greek, but i need to ask, is there a particular reason why you want to know why "thou sayest" would actually mean "that's your way of puting it"? if so, i would love to hear your point of view as to why you may think this.
 
I didn't want to know why "thou sayest" would actually mean "that's your way of puting it". I wanted to know why "though sayest" would actually mean "Yes. It is as you say." Then I asked "what if I think it means 'that's your way of putting it?'".

Oh yea, but thats in the OP.

Does anyone have a link on Koine Greek colloquialism that explains "su lego"="yes" or should I just take your word for it?

BTW I don't go around defining what Lukewarm Christian is ... but I would assume that one who asserts that the new Testament wasn't written in Greek is (not that anyone here does).
 
Your first question did get answered, right? The second answer is that if you think it means 'That's your way of putting it' then as a Christian that is something you can bring to the table and suggest, although to Jesus you are important enough that any such revelation could be entirely meant for you alone. I would like to know what you thought about the high priest prophecying Jesus' death for the good of the nation? To me it does not seem consistent with 'That's your way of putting it'.

I know you didn't mean it so harshly, but I think about what the phrase 'Lukewarm Christian' means and how most people would take it. The only person in scripture who used that term was Jesus, and it had been expressly revealed to him by The Father for a specific situation.(Rev 1:1) Usually no Christian accuses another person of being lukewarm, because it is similar to saying 'Thou fool', which is a judgment that is too high for us. Jesus said when someone says 'Thou fool' it is a warning that the person who speaks it is in danger of fiery judgment. Its one of the attitude meters given to us to keep us in check. ".... but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hellfire....(Matthew 5:22 ) It is a good idea to clarify what you mean by 'Lukewarm Christian' whenever you call someone that.
 
Do me a favor and dont put words in my mouth. I never claimed that "that's your way of putting it" is in the original scripture... but neither is "Yes. It is as you say"! And no, my question wasn't answered: Seattlegal sited me with the horse's mouth, but no one has still answered why "Thou sayest/Su lego"="Yes. It is as you say". I'm not going to simply take your word for it as being "colloquial." Show me or remain silent.
 
I'm thinking that each individual instance needs to be taken in context.

It has been mentioned that some of the religious authorities repeatedly tried to "catch Jesus in his words," or "entangle him in his talk." (See Matt 22, Mark 12, Luke 20, for a few examples.) Su lego used in this context can mean something like, "own your own words!" You might want to consider the following passage in this respect:
Matt 12:33 [Jesus said] “Either make the tree good and its fruit good, or else make the tree bad and its fruit bad; for a tree is known by its fruit. 34 Brood of vipers! How can you, being evil, speak good things? For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks. 35 A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth good things, and an evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth evil things. 36 But I say to you that for every idle word men may speak, they will give account of it in the day of judgment. 37 For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned.”
 
OK, so when did "thou sayest" somehow come to mean "Yes. It is as you say"? What if I think it means something more like "That's your way of putting it"?

Anyone got the horse's mouth Greek?
Yeah, I got the Strong's Concordance and the Interlinear Bible, what's it to you?

Or will you remain silent on this one too?
Quite the attitude...what do you expect to gain with it?

How about doing your own homework, since there is so much attitude:

Bullinger: Figures of Speech Used in the Bible

Interlinear Study Bible on StudyLight.org


Let's see if you're big enough to handle it on your own. I certainly have no reason to do your homework for you.
 
How about doing your own homework, since there is so much attitude:

I don't tell people they're going to hell so I don't exactly have any claims to back up. And while you did provide me with the horse's mouth Greek, in no way did you demonstrate why "su legeiv" came to mean "Yes. It is as you say" in the NIV.
King James' "thou sayest" I can understand. You see, there's no added commentary. That's called the horse's mouth.
 
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