Which Parts of the Bible Do You Quote Most Often?

lunamoth

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I think I tend to quote from the gospel of John and the first letter of John most often, and that's because I like the high Christology and the message that God is love which is so emphasized by John.

Do you find that there are books or parts of the Bible you refer to more often than others?

Are there parts of the Bible you either don't know or understand very well, or just tend to ignore?

Just a friendly conversation starter. :)
 
I quote from passages that indicate or lead toward love, personal growth, positivity. Cause I'm that namby pamby lovey dovey type.

Actually that is because that is the parts I primarily treat literally. When G!d displays human traits other than love, I tend to look deeper trying to find a metaphorical or metaphysical meaning/understanding. Which is why I don't readily quote from there, first it isn't for a soundbite, it is for a discussion, and second the power in the interpretation relates personally to each individuals life experience, so my understanding doesn't always apply directly to others. (and it changes with what is going on in my life...the inspiration I can receive from those particular passages)
 
I tend to quote most from the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke). I find John lovely, but already containing theology. The synoptics are beautiful in their simplicity and give me clear goals to strive for in my attitude and behavior. I especially like the beatitudes and the parables.

I enjoy Proverbs a lot- tons of good advice in there, just as one would expect. Psalms can be lovely, though I confess I have little use for all the ones about smiting one's enemies. Paul's epistles contains some of the things I find most beautiful and meaningful and also some of the things that I struggle to understand. Paul is very complex.

Stuff that I struggle with...

Revelation. First, it's loaded with symbolism. Second, every conservative/fundamentalist church I went to interpreted it differently. Third, I later found it just did nothing for me. I'm not saying it is that way for everyone, but it's just not very relevant to my life. The way I see it- I am supposed to live in a Christ-like manner as much as possible, and I should be engaged in an attitude that reflects the fruits of the Spirit. My potential is to take up and carry the cross, to heal, to love, to serve... with joy, peace, love, compassion, understanding, gentleness, humility, etc. If I'm doing that, it really doesn't matter if the world is ending. I'll do it each day until I die or the world ends. So what's the difference? I just don't get it.

Numbers. Oh, Numbers. It drops me off to sleep. I try, I really do. But there are some *dense* passages in there! :eek:
 
I think I tend to quote from the gospel of John and the first letter of John most often, and that's because I like the high Christology and the message that God is love which is so emphasized by John.

Do you find that there are books or parts of the Bible you refer to more often than others?

Are there parts of the Bible you either don't know or understand very well, or just tend to ignore?

Just a friendly conversation starter. :)


You know what I see quoted quite a bit? "Trust in the LORD with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways, acknowledge him, and he will direct your path." (Proverbs 3:5-6). It's actually kind of weird, but I picked that verse out when I was studying Proverbs about four or five years ago, and then all of the sudden it was everywhere: on plaques, calendars, church bulletins, and so on. Even now I run across it quite often. Maybe it's God's way of reminding me that I'm not as smart as I think I am.

The other verse I refer to quite a bit (I don't really quote scripture very much, unless it's asked of me; otherwise, I usually just refer to things) is this one from Ezekiel 33:
12 "Therefore, son of man, say to your countrymen, 'The righteousness of the righteous man will not save him when he disobeys, and the wickedness of the wicked man will not cause him to fall when he turns from it. The righteous man, if he sins, will not be allowed to live because of his former righteousness.' 13 If I tell the righteous man that he will surely live, but then he trusts in his righteousness and does evil, none of the righteous things he has done will be remembered; he will die for the evil he has done. 14 And if I say to the wicked man, 'You will surely die,' but he then turns away from his sin and does what is just and right- 15 if he gives back what he took in pledge for a loan, returns what he has stolen, follows the decrees that give life, and does no evil, he will surely live; he will not die. 16 None of the sins he has committed will be remembered against him. He has done what is just and right; he will surely live.

I refer to it when I run into the argument that the Bible doesn't make sense because God is mean and nasty in the Old Testament, and kind and loving in the New Testament. In my opinion, this message that Ezekiel delivered could have just as easily been the words of Jesus himself.
 
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