Hindu deities=1 God?

Discussion in 'Hinduism' started by fitd, May 18, 2011.

  1. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

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    I recognized what you wrote as what I have seen before, I don't suppose anything but there seem to be some similarities between the two.
    I don't know about diagnosing disorders over the internet but you have to admit that it pretty funny how self-important you make yourself out to be in this quote? Yes, I remember you and I remember many people on these board.
    You take up a lot of space, this is the result of "making a pretty huge impact", admit it, you like it.
     
  2. Francis Earl

    Francis Earl Member

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    YOU are making me important for no reason.

    You are the second person to not notice sarcasm in the post.

    FWIW, I have absolutely no idea who you are.

    I really don't, I came back to engage topics I am interested in.

    Instead, everyone is making it about me.

    It is getting old already, and the terrible performance of the servers for this site is just making it that much less appealing to continue here.

    If you don't like me, block me, it doesn't need to be this big of a deal.
     
  3. Devils' Advocate

    Devils' Advocate Well-Known Member

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    Just not going to get through to you that there is nothing simple about reality, huh?
     
  4. Francis Earl

    Francis Earl Member

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    Mind is not simple, but reality is absolutely simple.
     
  5. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

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    @Francis Earl
    You seem so annoyed, you don't have to answer me, I take no offense. I just thought the question marks you used, indicated questions that seemed funny to answer. I'll stop now, no need to gang up on you.
     
  6. Francis Earl

    Francis Earl Member

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    Humans have made their lives far more difficult than need be...

    How to even make it complicated without mind though?

    Patanjali states in the Yoga Sutras that Yoga is exactly the art of stopping the mind.
     
  7. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    lol.... perceptions... I didn't know...

    Everyone making it all about you? darn them...

    I noticed you were prolific... kicked the crap outta my post per day record...

    I also didn't notice in your introduction you were lunatik, or the nature of the name change or subterfuge...

    So I can't hardly welcome you back....yet.
     
  8. Devils' Advocate

    Devils' Advocate Well-Known Member

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    I believe the actual concept is to still the mind, not stop it.
     
  9. StevePame

    StevePame Administrator

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    My thanks, ACOT, for pointing this out. Turns out iBrian left some extensive notes as to why Lunitik was banned in 2012. It was easy to copy those into the ban report for Francis.
     
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  10. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

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    That's actually very funny!
     
  11. wil

    wil UNeyeR1

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    Makes me wonder if anyone can change.... like mee... or Tau... or lunitik... or if we'd ever give them the opportunity...
     
  12. A Cup Of Tea

    A Cup Of Tea An ordinary cup of tea

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    I know. I don't know if you've changed, because you have been here with me all this time. This is apparently the second time I've spotted Lunitik (according to old correspondence with DA and Thomas) and as I said to him, there is a reason I can spot him. That does not mean that he is the same, but for me he is not different enough to have a fruitful discussion with.
    But I'm well aware that this community can be very defensive and united against other, it is a strength and a weakness, and it troubles me at times.

    (I think what constitutes a God in the western mind can possible be different from an eastern mind so if Brahman is THE God or not can be very tricky to answer.)
     
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  13. Senthil

    Senthil Active Member

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    An astute observation, ACOT. As you may have guessed, I struggle with it here all the time.

    However, what our friend was trying to get at wasn't really eastern in my POV, anyway. Very neo-advaita (a misunderstanding of traditional advaita, and common in the west, replacing the ego 'i' for the more traditional 'Self .. I' that Ramana Maharshi and others referred to. Quite the misunderstanding all around. I couldn't have had any dialogue with him either, (have tried that, and it's always lead nowhere) and recognised it right away, so didn't add anything much. The situation resolved itself, as those same situations on forums generally do. My post at 179 summed up what I thought. It's fairly common. A psychiatrist friend of mine confirmed that to me some time back, Their strategy is just non-judgemental listening, but no therapy or drugs seems to work. Causes vary from autism to stress-induced stuff.
    Many advaitins make efforts to to distance themselves from neo-advaita, and place it outside of Hinduism entirely.
     
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Senthil —

    Can I ask a question or two?

    The first is easy: Traditionalists of the Perennialist school tend towards Advaita Vedanta and see Adi Shankara as (I could be wrong here) the 'go-to' authority on the interpretation of the Hindu Tradition as a whole. His name crops up often, as does Ibn Arabi when discussing Islam, and Thomas Aquinas when discussing Christianity ... this stems from Guenon's and Schuon's 'favour' when discussing the traditions as a whole. I just wondered what's your take on Advaita and the West? (Maybe a bigger question than I appreciate ... )

    While I am a 'Trad' of the Perennialist school, I do not see Guenon nor Schuon as quite the infallible authorities many Trads regard them to be. I am aware of, to me, glaring 'gaps' in their knowledge of Patristic writings, for example, but I'm also aware that the content of those gaps came in after Schuon and Guenon, thanks to a 'back to the sources' movement in theology to which I belong.

    The other is personal. Augustine said words to the effect of 'Time, when no-one asks, I know what it is. When someone asks, I don't know' and I'm in this boat when the question if the 'I' crops up, the distinction between 'self' and 'Self' and 'ego' and 'person' and 'personality' ...

    So in short my questions them from the misunderstanding you've highlighted above, and I'd be interested, if you have the time and inclination, to discuss it, to help me firm up my footings ... perhaps we could start another thread?

    (Or maybe I should re-read my Guenon: 'The Multiple States of Being', 'Man and His Becoming According to the Vedanta', 'Studies in Hinduism'.)
     
  15. Senthil

    Senthil Active Member

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    Thanks, Thomas. I'm no expert but I can give it a shot.

    Firstly, I'm not an advaitin, nor a person who sees Shankara as infallible. However, historically, Advaita Vedanta has been the subsect of Hinduism that has made it to the west, for several reasons. One is that many of the original swamis and thinkers who came followed the Smarta (another term for Advaita Vedanta, basically) tradition. It tends to emphasise the intellect, and debate, over bhakti. So perhaps it fits in better for the west, because of that. Less of a jump. There is still (personal belief) a subconscious aversion to 'idol worship' I think, and Advaita can be studied outside of any bhakti, yet in traditional advaita, bhakti is there, just not to the degree the bhakti schools are. There are many other schools in India, including strict Vaishnavism,. Saivism, etc. Most respect Shankara, but are not quite so enthusiastic about it as Advaitins. So, in summary, it varies. Some other schools even try to get or prove that Sankara was exclusively one of their own. In reality, the Smarta sect says that all other sects are essentially the same thing ... Siva is God, Shaktia is God, Vishnu is God, etc. So those that try that are just selective when they choose which verses of his to quote.

    The other question is where neo-advaita gets it messed up. The biggest problem is the pronoun 'I'. It has two distinct meanings. The first is the ego, the personality, represented by a name usually, but also substituted by 'I' for the linguistic shortcut. Very very common.

    The other 'I' is unheard of by the common man. It is the part of you that is identical to God, only to be realised. It's gotten to by persistent sadhana, meditation, and devotion, by a very rare few on the planet. Years (lifetimes) of study, culminating in a non-experience called nirvikalpa samadhi, and translated (poorly) as the Realisation of the Self. It is the culmination (what Hindus believe) of many lifetimes on this planet, when all karmas are resolved. The seers and mystics who have been there say it is not describable. Just very recently I heard it said that, 'All you can say about it is that there has been a fundamental change in perspective'. after. So mystically it's incredibly deep. Souls there would never speak about it at all, or at least very little, and would 99% of the time only talk about how to get there. So the teacher speaks in practical terms, for the benefit, of others, not in 'yapping' ways for the benefit of himself, his ego, on how much he knows.

    Essentially it illustrates that at the very core of you, after the physical, emotional, intellectual, astral, and even soul bodies are all discarded, that is what remains.

    Therefore, for someone who has seen both types, the neo-advaitin (who has confused these two 'I's, its actually really easy to recognise.
    Hope this helps some.
     
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  16. Thomas

    Thomas Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Helps quite a lot, actually. Really, a lot.

    Heartfelt thanks for your time.

    I've just read it, so I'll not bounce straight back with anything, and not sure that I would anyway. A lot of resonances, and a lot to think about, simply explained.

    Thanks again.
     

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