The Real God of the Bible

Ahanu

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Here is an interview with an atheist named Francesca Stavrakopoulou I found informative. The discussion here involved Old Testament stories and the broader culture they were written in. The gist of the discussion is that the beliefs and ideas in the Old Testament are not unique.

One discussion I found hilarious was the reference to idols as s*** gods, and so I had to share it! While looking up this biblical reference I was amused with the variations in translations here. The TLB and CEV seem to be closest to the literal translation. 🤭

At noon Elijah mocked them. He said, “Shout loudly, for he’s a god! Maybe he’s thinking it over; maybe he has wandered away; or maybe he’s on the road. Perhaps he’s sleeping and will wake up!” They shouted loudly, and cut themselves with knives and spears, according to their custom, until blood gushed over them.
-1 Kings 18.27-28, HCSB

At noon, Elijah began making fun of them. “Pray louder!” he said. “Baal must be a god. Maybe he's daydreaming or using the toilet or traveling somewhere. Or maybe he's asleep, and you have to wake him up.
-1 Kings 18.27, CEV

About noontime, Elijah began mocking them. “You’ll have to shout louder than that,” he scoffed, “to catch the attention of your god! Perhaps he is talking to someone, or is out sitting on the toilet, or maybe he is away on a trip, or is asleep and needs to be wakened!
-1 Kings 18.27, TLB

At noon Elijah began to taunt them. “Shout louder!” he said. “Surely he is a god! Perhaps he is deep in thought, or busy, or traveling. Maybe he is sleeping and must be awakened.”
-1 Kings 18.27, NIV

At noon Elijah began to tease them. “Shout louder!” he said. “I’m sure Baal is a god! Perhaps he has too much to think about. Or maybe he has gone to the toilet. Or perhaps he’s away on a trip. Maybe he’s sleeping. You might have to wake him up.”
-1 Kings 18.27, NIRV

By noon, Elijah had started making fun of them, taunting, “Call a little louder—he is a god, after all. Maybe he’s off meditating somewhere or other, or maybe he’s gotten involved in a project, or maybe he’s on vacation. You don’t suppose he’s overslept, do you, and needs to be waked up?” They prayed louder and louder, cutting themselves with swords and knives—a ritual common to them—until they were covered with blood.
-1 Kings 18.27, MSG

 
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muhammad_isa

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At noon, Elijah began making fun of them. “Pray louder!” he said. “Baal must be a god. Maybe he's daydreaming or using the toilet or traveling somewhere. Or maybe he's asleep, and you have to wake him up.
-1 Kings 18.27, CEV
Baal / Zeus, using the toilet? ;)
 

RabbiO

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@Ahanu -

Considering that there is nothing in the Hebrew text about toilets, it is hard to understand why you believe the translations you referenced come closest to the literal meaning of the text.
 

Ahanu

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@Ahanu -

Considering that there is nothing in the Hebrew text about toilets, it is hard to understand why you believe the translations you referenced come closest to the literal meaning of the text.
Let me clarify: With regards to the translations I shared above, I believe the two I highlighted above are closer to the literal meaning than the others, because it gives an indication about what the writer actually intended. I didn't mean that they are 100 percent accurate.
 
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Ahanu

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ESV is even closer: And at noon Elijah mocked them, saying, “Cry aloud, for he is a god. Either he is musing, or he is relieving himself, or he is on a journey, or perhaps he is asleep and must be awakened.”

Some translations like the HCSB are repetitive ("maybe he has wandered away; or maybe he’s on the road"), making the reader wonder where he wandered away to. ESV is more to the point.
 
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Ahanu

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Click here for an analysis online with differing viewpoints.
 

wil

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a figment of your imagination
I believe the two I highlighted above are closer to the literal meaning than the others, because it gives an indication about what the writer actually intended
Are you translating from the original Hebrew? What makes believe it more conforms to the writers intention millenia ago?

Which author? JEPD?
 

Ahanu

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What makes believe it more conforms to the writers intention millenia ago?

Which author? JEPD?
1. Modern scholarship has reached this conclusion.
2. Medieval Jewish commentators have read it this way.
3. It makes the most sense to me in context.
4. Archaeology has confirmed this practice of smearing idols (for example, see 2 Kings 10.27: "Then they demolished the pillar of Baal, and destroyed the temple of Baal, and made it a latrine to this day").
toi-640x400.webp

5. There is a connection between the Hebrew śiăḥ and the Arabic root word for urinate, defecate.
 

RabbiO

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Let me clarify: With regards to the translations I shared above, I believe the two I highlighted above are closer to the literal meaning than the others, because it gives an indication about what the writer actually intended. I didn't mean that they are 100 percent accurate.
I see the issue now. You are confusing actual meaning with literal meaning.
 
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