Different Forms of Christianity

Sacredstar

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I thought it might be interesting to have a thread on different forms of Christianity.

Here is a Celtic Christianity website to kick it off, I must admit I knew nothing about the Celtics, so I personally found it interesting especially as they are so much more connected to nature in their beliefs then other strands of the religion.

http://www.thisischurch.com/christianinfo/celticchristianity.htm

Love Kim xx
 
Sacredstar said:
I thought it might be interesting to have a thread on different forms of Christianity.

Here is a Celtic Christianity website to kick it off, I must admit I knew nothing about the Celtics, so I personally found it interesting especially as they are so much more connected to nature in their beliefs then other strands of the religion.

http://www.thisischurch.com/christianinfo/celticchristianity.htm

Love Kim xx
Hah, yes and it does not oft sit well with the Church of Rome, ya might say;)

v/r

Q
 
Please tell us more Q

Perhaps this would be a good place for you to explain the diferences between the protestant and catholic strands.

being love

kim xx
 
I like this form of the best. The very first day of the NT church for they had all things in common and were in one accord.


2:36 Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly, that God hath made the same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ.
2:37Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart, and said unto Peter and to the rest of the apostles, Men and brethren, what shall we do?
2:38Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.
2:39 For the promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the LORD our God shall call.
2:40 And with many other words did he testify and exhort, saying, Save yourselves from this untoward generation.
2:41Then they that gladly received his word were baptized: and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls.
2:42 And they continued stedfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers.
2:43 And fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.
2:44 And all that believed were together, and had all things common;
 
Sacredstar said:
Please tell us more Q

Perhaps this would be a good place for you to explain the diferences between the protestant and catholic strands.

being love

kim xx
No, A Celtic Christian (Catholic type), is Catholic and loyal to Rome. It is just that at one time Rome ticked the Abbots and Abbesses of Ireland off (circa 650), and almost paid for it at the pointy end of a broad sword, held by women and men who were bonified priests of the Church...

The ironic thing is that before Patrick, the Irish were loathe to place word on paper (or anything else), even though they had a written language. After Patrick, however, the monks went to town (often adding their own little diddys in the margins of books they were transcribing (often raucous).

When Rome sent a council to Ireland to meet these mysterious "churchmen" who so fastidiously adhered to the transcribing of sacred history, they were stunned to find "women" as priests. Several Bishops ordered the women to be put to death, only to find their own throats in sudden peril, by the very same women (priests), who carried broad swords under their cassacks larger and heavier than that which the council's guard carried...and the women priests were much faster, and much quicker to dispatch anyone who attempted to harm the "faith" as it were...even those sent from Rome...

Good reading on this is How the Irish Saved Civilization, by Thomas Cahill. Anchor Books, 1995.


"Cahill outlines the fall of the Roman world to the invading barbarians and the conversion of Ireland to Christianity. The barbarians destroyed the Roman civilization including librarians that could have preserved Latin learning. The Irish love for the written and spoken word led their monks to preserve Christian literature as well as all writing that came their way. The Christian monks and their manuscripts survived in Ireland because they were sufficiently out of the way that they did not attract the attention of the invaders. After the barbarians set up their nations in the former empire, the Irish monks invaded England and then continental Europe as Christian missionaries founding monasteries and producing their manuscripts. The continent needed them; Cahill describes the intellectual world these missionaries found:



The intellectual disciplines of distinction, definition, and dialectic that had once been the glory of men like Augustine were unobtainable by readers in the Dark Ages, whose apprehension of the world was simple and immediate, framed in myth and magic. A man no longer subordinated one thought to another with mathematical precision; instead, he apprehended similarities and balances, types and paradigms, parallels and symbols. It was a world not of thought, but of images."



And yes, St Bridget is a popular Saint within my family's way, Even though her roots are suspect in Druidic folklore. But then, any other "ethnic group" has their own additions to the faith...culturally.



As long as it does not detract from the truth that we need to be saved...Jesus, and Jesus alone does this.



By the way, almost everyone of those "monks" paid with their lives, and died uttering Jesus' name on their lips, not Conan, not Calhoun, not Connacht, Jesus.



v/r



Q
 
lunamoth said:
Looks like I've found my next book selection.

thanks,
lunamoth
Please Luna,

I'd like to know your thoughts, after.

v/r

Q
 
I think it is great that alternate forms of christianity have survived to this day. I don't believe in an orthodox faith. Faith like God and the holy spirit is invisible. It's what in the heart and soul that count, that is where God is found.

" Be still and know that I am God".
 
The Society of Friends (as the Quakers are more formally known) is indeed a wonderful group of Christians. Quakers have been active in witnessing their faith to society at large for some time--they were active in the antislavery movement in the United States before the American Civil War, and I first became familiar with them in the antiwar movement in the late sixties.

One of the founders of the Friends, George Fox, is celebrated in this song:


George Fox

(tune: trad. arr. Carter / Lyrics: Carter)

There's a light that is shining
In the heart of a man,
There's a light that was shining
When the world began.
There's a light that is shining
In the Turk and the Jew
A light that is shining, friend,
In me and in you.

Chorus Old leather breeches
Shaggy, shaggy locks!
Old leather breeches
Shaggy, shaggy locks!
With your old leather breeches
And your shaggy, shaggy locks
You are pulling down the pillars
Of the world, George Fox. With a book and a steeple,
With a bell and a key
They would bind it forever
But they can't (said he).
For the book it will perish
The steeple will fall
But the light will be shining
At the end of it all.

Chorus

“If we give you a pistol,
Will you fight for the Lord?”
“But you can't kill the devil
With a gun or a sword.”
“Will you swear on the Bible?”
“I will not,” said he.
“Truth is more holy
than the book to me.”

Chorus

There's an ocean of darkness
And I drown in the night
Till I come through the darkness
To the ocean of light.
You can lock me in prison
But the light will be free,
“I walk in the glory
Of the light,” said he.

Chorus

An alternate chorus:

Walk in the light, wherever you may be,
Walk in the light, wherever you may be!
In my old leather breeches and my shaggy, shaggy locks,
I am walking in the glory of the light, said Fox.
 
Very nice BlueJay, ;)

Here is a bit of trivia...President Richard Nixon was a Quaker (and he stopped the American involvement in the Vietnam War).

v/r

Q
 
You read it Bluejay ! What did you find ironic about it?
Hmmm--I'm not sure I found any irony! I've been puzzling over the question for a couple days now--elucidation?
I did find it an important book for anyone interested in the Christian faith, which wasn't what I expected when I started it--I'd assumed it to be "merely" a work of popular history--
 
Dear BluejayWay

Beautiful thank you for sharing.

Interesting I was just reading Galatians about freedom.

It is for freedom that Christ set us free. Stand firm then and do not let yourselves be burdened by a yoke of slavery. You, my brothers were called to be free. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self control. Against such things there is no law. Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. Carry each other's burdens, and in this way you will fulfil the law of Christ. Let us not grow weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.

Walking the extra mile......

Love beyond measure

Kim xx
 
BluejayWay said:
Hmmm--I'm not sure I found any irony! I've been puzzling over the question for a couple days now--elucidation?
I did find it an important book for anyone interested in the Christian faith, which wasn't what I expected when I started it--I'd assumed it to be "merely" a work of popular history--
I thought you might find that a very small group of isolated priests might be responsible for helping to keep the world from going backwards, and starting all over again, and did so in such a short span of time (what, 150 years window?). Aside from "religion keeping" these same priests "educated" the people of "import" even unto Charlemagne (arguable of course)...with whit, humility, the cross, and a hefty broad sword!

Typical Celtic "death is death, life is what to fear"...;)
 
Indeed, Quahom, sometimes what it takes is a few people doing the right thing for the rest of us to benefit:)

Heh--and it was Neil Young who reminded us that "Even Richard Nixon's got soul";)

And, Kim, you are more than welcome! Thank you for starting this thread--it's got a great deal of potential.

And we do have a "quasi-Quaker" running about here--ISFP--
C'mon, we need an insider's insights here!
 
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