Yahweh's Power vs Pharoh

Discussion in 'Judaism' started by Courtney00, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. Courtney00

    Courtney00 New Member

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    Why would Yahweh in the Book of Exodus be particularly concerned
    to display his power in relation to Pharaoh?
    Simply to display his wrath?
     
  2. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Admin

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    Moved to Judaism. :)
     
  3. Quahom1

    Quahom1 What was the question?

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    I believe the purpose of God showing His strength was for the immediate benefit of the Hebrews (...if God is for us, who can stand against us?"), and the long term benefit of mankind. If the strongest human powers can not defeat God, that is a humbling experience indeed. Second, I think the way in which God used nature as His weapons against the swords, chariots and spears of man, is something to consider. Man fabricates his weapons and tools from nature, wherein God uses nature as He wills. Third, God pointed out a simple truth, overwhelming numbers does not guarantee victory. The Pharoh's army was many, the Hebrews were few, and God was a force of One...that caused the Pharoh to lose everthing in a flash of wind and water. Pharoh went from the mighiest leader of one of the greatest nations, to the weakest leader of the weakest nation, in a blink of an eye.

    Just about the time man starts getting too big for his britches, God has a habit of taking him down a notch or four.

    Kind of like a father to his son. When I was young and thought I had it all, my father taught me a lessen I'll never forget. As big and as bad as we think we are, there is always someone a little bigger, or a little badder than we.

    my thoughts.

    v/r

    Q
     
  4. mee

    mee Interfaith Forums

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    Then Jehovah said to Moses: "Get up early in the morning and take a position in front of Phar´aoh, and you must say to him, ‘This is what Jehovah the God of the Hebrews has said: "Send my people away that they may serve me. For at this time I am sending all my blows against your heart and upon your servants and your people, to the end that you may know that there is none like me in all the earth. For by now I could have thrust my hand out that I might strike you and your people with pestilence and that you might be effaced from the earth. But, in fact, for this cause I have kept you in existence, for the sake of showing you my power and in order to have my name declared in all the earth. ...Exodus 9; 13;16

    (Romans 9:17) For the Scripture says to Phar´aoh: "For this very cause I have let you remain, that in connection with you I may show my power, and that my name may be declared in all the earth,.............. Did not pharaoh think he was better than God
    But Phar´aoh said: "Who is Jehovah, so that I should obey his voice to send Israel away? I do not know Jehovah at all and, what is more, I am not going to send Israel away Exodus 5;2........... oh dear. not a good thing to do, mock the true God


     
  5. Quahom1

    Quahom1 What was the question?

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    Heartily agreed Mee. Mock God, get socked in the eye, and then some for good measure.
     
  6. WesleyWes

    WesleyWes New Member

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    Yahwah...who? Just say Hashem. Amen

    [font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The Torah of Moses is a truth for all humanity, whether Jewish or not. [/font]
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    The Jewish idea is that the Torah of Moses is a truth for all humanity, whether Jewish or not. The Torah (as explained in the Talmud - Sanhedrin 58b) presents seven mitzvot for non-Jews to observe. These seven laws are the pillars of human civilization, and are named the "Seven Laws of Noah," since all humans are descended from Noah. They are:



    1. Do not murder.
    2. Do not steal.
    3. Do not worship false gods.
    4. Do not be sexually immoral.
    5. Do not eat the limb of an animal before it is killed.
    6. Do not curse God.
    7. Set up courts and bring offenders to justice.

    Maimonides explains that any human being who faithfully observes these laws earns a proper place in heaven. So you see, the Torah is for all humanity, no conversion necessary.

    As well, when King Solomon built the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, he specifically asked God to heed the prayer of non-Jews who come to the Temple (1-Kings 8:41-43). The Temple was the universal center of spirituality, which the prophet Isaiah referred to as a "house for all nations." The service in the Holy Temple during the week of Sukkot featured a total of 70 bull offerings, corresponding to each of the 70 nations of the world. In fact, the Talmud says if the Romans would have realized how much they were benefiting from the Temple, they never would have destroyed it!



    Today, there are many active groups of non-Jews called "B'nai Noach" who faithfully observe the Seven Laws of Noah.

    There is an excellent book on the topic, called:
    "The Path of the Righteous Gentile"
    by Chaim Clorfene and Yakov Rogalsky. See also:
    "The Real Messiah: A Jewish Response to Missionaries"
    by Aryeh Kaplan.

    You may also want to view a B'nai Noach web site at: http://www.hamayim.org/.
     
  7. iBrian

    iBrian Peace, Love and Unity Admin

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    Not sure what that post has to do with the specific question, WesleyWes?
     
  8. wil

    wil UNeyeR1 Moderator

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    In reading the books metaphysically it is a question of spiritual/heavenly powers and gifts v. Ego/earthly strengths...
    and then to continue in the physical/earthly plane we are not punished for our sins but by them.

    Lastly, I'd say I,B that WW has a point in that if we pharoahs were to follow those laws of Noah, we wouldn't have to deal with the laws of spirit, for each action there is an equal and opposite reaction..those that you ignore you naturally get smited for...whatever the karmic concept or pagan thought you attach to the outcome.

    namaste,
     
  9. Courtney00

    Courtney00 New Member

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    Well thanks for the help guys! I've devised my 3-point thesis
    "
    [font=&quot]Yahweh used his power to make the Pharaoh indirectly destroy his own divinity, to establish the rudiments of His world and to warn and to prevent any future opposition to His rule"
    I'll let ya kno how the paper goes,

    I dont want to post my paper, just in case my prof 'googles' a sentence and finds it online if ya want a copy of the paper can i email it to u or something??

    Thanks!!!
    [/font]
     
  10. mee

    mee Interfaith Forums

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    But, in fact, for this cause I have kept you in existence, for the sake of showing you my power and in order to have my name declared in all the earth.EXODUS 9;16
    (Romans 9:17) For the Scripture says to Phar′aoh: “For this very cause I have let you remain, that in connection with you I may show my power, and that my name may be declared in all the earth.”
    When Pharaoh defiantly asked who Jehovah was, he did not expect the consequences he experienced. Jehovah himself responded, bringing ten plagues upon Egypt. Those plagues were not just blows against the nation. They were blows against the gods of Egypt.

    The plagues demonstrated Jehovah’s superiority over Egyptian deities. (Exodus 12:12; Numbers 33:4)
     

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