The Elder Brothers of Humanity

Discussion in 'New Age' started by taijasi, Feb 25, 2006.

  1. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

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    Andrew/Taijasi,

    Thanks for that link. Let me see if I can find time to take a good look at it.
     
  2. taijasi

    taijasi Gnōthi seauton

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    Nick, what I like about this ... is the contemplation that a PLAN has existed since - why, gee, maybe even before LIFE on Planet Earth even began!

    What, you mean God actually has the Intelligence, Foresight, Ingenuity and Skillful Means to Plan entire Evolutionary Schemes, with problems to be worked out, qualities of Consciousness (and more) to be developed, and definite goals - for both Deity and subordinate entities - to be achieved?

    Gee, that all sounds too logical. That sounds so ... Wonderful. ;) :)
     
  3. Nicholas Weeks

    Nicholas Weeks Bodhicitta

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  4. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

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    Taijasi/Andrew,

    I agree with you that there is a plan, but I would qualify it by saying the plan was devised by an impersonal god (one of many), not a personal, single, almighty God. I have heard that the deity which planned out our galaxy and the deity which planned out our solar system are two different deities (with our galactic deity being on a much higher level than our solar deity), and this idea makes a lot of sense to me.

    I also like the idea that all of these deities are arranged in a type of hierarchy, and that the Elder Brothers here on earth are part of that very hierarchy.
     
  5. mike_j

    mike_j New Member

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    have you guys heard about the Kogi Mamos live webcast? its taking place today on esoguru.com - should be very interesting to watch!
     
  6. Nick the Pilot

    Nick the Pilot Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mike,

    I see that the Kogi tribesmen that you are referring to are called the elder brothers of humanity in a webpage that talks about the webcast, but I do not think the Kogi are the same as the elder brothers that are being discussed in this thread. (It is possible, but I doubt it.)
     
  7. Nicholas Weeks

    Nicholas Weeks Bodhicitta

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    A short article by Blavatsky that gives insights into the nature of an Adept or Brother:

    Mahatmas and Chelas

    By H. P. Blavatsky

    A Mahatma is a personage, who, by special training and education, has evolved those higher faculties and has attained that spiritual knowledge, which ordinary humanity will acquire after passing through numberless series of reincarnations during the process of cosmic evolution, provided, of course, that they do not go, in the meanwhile, against the purposes of Nature and thus bring on their own annihilation. This process of the self-evolution of the Mahatma extends over a number of "incarnations," although, comparatively speaking, they are very few.

    Now, what is it that incarnates? The occult doctrine, so far as it is given out, shows that the first three principles die more or less with what is called the physical death. The fourth principle, together with the lower portions of the fifth, in which reside the animal propensities, has Kama Loka for its abode, where it suffers the throes of disintegration in proportion to the intensity of those lower desires; while it is the higher Manas, the pure man, which is associated with the sixth and the seventh principles, that goes into Devachan to enjoy there the effects of its good Karma, and then to be reincarnated as a higher individuality.

    Now, an entity, that is passing through the occult training in its successive births, gradually has less and less (in each incarnation) of that lower Manas until there arrives a time when its whole Manas, being of an entirely elevated character, is centered in the higher individuality, when such a person may be said to have become a Mahatma. At the time of his physical death, all the lower four principles perish without any suffering, for these are, in fact, to him like a piece of wearing apparel which he puts on and off at will.

    The real Mahatma is then not his physical body but that higher Manaswhich is inseparably linked to the Atma and its vehicle (the sixth principle) -- a union effected by him in a comparatively very short period by passing through the process of self-evolution laid down by the Occult Philosophy. When, therefore, people express a desire to "see a Mahatma," they really do not seem to understand what it is they ask for. How can they, by their physical eyes, hope to see that which transcends that sight? Is it the body -- a mere shell or mask -- they crave or hunt after? And supposing they see the body of a Mahatma, how can they know that behind that mask is concealed an exalted entity? By what standard are they to judge whether the Maya before them reflects the image of a true Mahatma or not? And who will say that the physical is not a Maya?

    Higher things can be perceived only by a sense pertaining to those higher things. And whoever therefore wants to see the real Mahatma, must use his intellectual sight. He must so elevate his Manas that its perception will be clear and all mists created by Maya must be dispelled. His vision will then be bright and he will see the Mahatmas wherever he may be, for, being merged into the sixth and the seventh principles, which are ubiquitous and omnipresent, the Mahatmas may be said to be everywhere.

    But, at the same time, just as we may be standing on a mountain top and have within our sight the whole plain, and yet not be cognisant of any particular tree or spot, because from that elevated position all below is nearly identical, and as our attention may be drawn to something which may be dissimilar to its surroundings -- so in the same manner, although the whole of humanity is within the mental vision of the Mahatmas, they cannot be expected to take special note of every human being, unless that being by his special acts draws their particular attention to himself.

    The highest interest of humanity, as a whole, is their special concern, for they have identified themselves with that Universal Soul which runs through Humanity, and he, who would draw their attention, must do so through that Soul which pervades everywhere. This perception of the Manas may be called "faith" which should not be confounded with blind belief. "Blind faith" is an expression sometimes used to indicate belief without perception or understanding; while the true perception of the Manas is that enlightened belief, which is the real meaning of the word "faith." This belief should at the same time be accompanied by knowledge, i.e., experience, for "true knowledge brings with it faith." Faith is the perception of the Manas (the fifth principle), while knowledge, in the true sense of the term, is the capacity of the Intellect, i.e., it is spiritual perception. In short, the higher individuality of man, composed of his higher Manas, the sixth and the seventh principles, should work as a unity, and then only can it obtain "divine wisdom," for divine things can be sensed only by divine faculties. Thus the desire, which should prompt one to apply for chelaship, is to so far understand the operations of the Law of Cosmic Evolution as will enable him to work in harmonious accord with Nature, instead of going against its purposes through ignorance.

    • (From Blavatsky's Collected Writings 6:239-41)
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015
  8. Nicholas Weeks

    Nicholas Weeks Bodhicitta

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    Katherine Tingley met one of the Brothers just after she became leader of the TS Pt Loma. This excerpt is from Splendor of the Soul chapter two:

    When I first came into the Theosophical Movement I had only the theosophical books and H. P. Blavatsky's knowledge of her great teachers on which to rely. But since that time I have had in my own experience the proof of those truths which theosophy expounds in reference to man's attainment of a state of perfection so far as it can be reached in one earth-life. This fact of relative human perfection was revealed to me through a personal meeting with such a man — one of our great teachers. What I tell you is not the result of fancy, nor of dreams, nor of delusions, nor of an imagined self-sufficiency in my own spiritual discernment. But I do tell you what happened and what I saw and what I myself learned.

    Not so many years ago, on my first tour through Egypt and India, I received an invitation to meet a great teacher. I met this great character in India. Early in the morning before the sun was up I had a call from the teacher's chela, as they called him, who brought four servants and a special escort with their open palanquin. The chela acted as guide and, with my maid, I went out up the mountains, and up the mountains, and up the mountains — the heat of the day was beyond anything that you can conceive of. After miles of travel we arrived at noon at an almost unimaginable height. Everything except the great range looked small and insignificant. In looking out over the wonderful prospect, one could see how very easy it would be for one living up there all the time to have high aspirations and great ideas and to grow and to become royal and splendid. All that was possible.

    I had my mind fashioned, as I think yours might have been, to see something quite remarkable — some astounding manifestation. But when I reached this person, he was standing leaning against a tree with an English jackknife in his hand — he was cutting a little piece of wood. When he saw me he came to meet me, asking me to excuse him for a short time because one of the bullocks with which one of his chelas was plowing had suffered an injury to his neck and he was trying to repair the yoke.

    I looked straight at the man. Now, even in H. P. Blavatsky's time he was considered to be quite old in years, but he looked very young when I saw him. I would have said that he was then not more than thirty-two or thirty-three years of age. He appeared to be Tibetan, dark of skin. His face was unlike any other that I had ever seen before. His whole life was lighted up with an inner light that had toned his features, had brightened his eyes, and had brought to him the glow of youthfulness and splendor of character. One could not look merely at his face: his whole figure commanded attention. Yet he was very unpretentious in manner.

    I did not ask many questions because I found that he anticipated them — questions that I had wanted an answer to ever since I came into the Theosophical Society, especially as to how I was to meet the heavy responsibilities that became mine when I was named as the Leader of the Society for life — the responsibility of helping to direct this Society of aspirants for spiritual wisdom and knowledge at a time when I was unknown to all save perhaps one or two members of the Society.

    I am trying to enter again into that meeting with the teacher, so that I may give you whatever I am allowed to speak of. In the first place, there was a conversation in reference to the little time that I could stay there. He urged me to hasten back in order to be inside the village before darkness because there were bandits and queer people all about. He then gave me many ideas, which of course might not interest the public because they pertained very largely to my theosophical work. Besides, it is very hard to find the language to describe the most glorious, superb, magnificent things in life. The most wonderful things that one ever sees in all their beauty can never be described. But in his presence I felt the greatness of life, the true splendor of life, and its royal promise. My mind at this meeting was unusually alert and awake.

    It was utterly impossible that this man was an impostor, as some might think, because he referred to incidents in my own past that I had almost forgotten — incidents that at the time turned my footsteps in this or in that direction, and that finally led to my meeting with W. Q. Judge and eventually to his appointment of me as his successor in the leadership of the Society. Mr. Judge had found me working among the poor of the slums on the East Side of New York City, trying to help the unfortunate and to lift some of their burdens in an honest and determined way. That in itself was to me a great big world of effort. It seemed to me at the time that it was about as much as I could handle. But here was a man who had grown great in unison with the higher expressions of life, to which he had attuned his whole being in utter self-forgetfulness. We all have this same opportunity, but he was a great soul and welcomed this opportunity, and profited by it daily.

    We must all, sooner or later, believe in the marvelous powers of the spiritual soul of man. We must all sooner or later fathom the depths of our own nature and find therein the royal talisman of wisdom and truth. This is what I found with and in this great teacher. Just while I was standing there with him, I discovered anew, under the great force of his presence — and it came to me like an illumination — that there was something indeed in me more than the mere mentality, that there was a vital, latent force inside me that desired to come out and inspire me to achieve things that I had never done before. It seemed to me as if I had never really lived before that moment, and never known so much about life as I then knew. This was the great day of my life — a day of greater promise for my work for all humanity. Since then I have felt that it would be easy to go through fire and suffering and persecution and anything to push this message of theosophy out to the world. The credit for this spirit of courage within me is not mine; it came to me from being in the presence of this great teacher and from realizing in him to what heights a true man can reach.

    I will only add that when I went to visit this teacher, I was weighed down with the responsibility of carrying on the work of the Theosophical Society throughout the world and of meeting the conditions that I knew must be changed, because my predecessor, William Quan Judge, had been ill for two years and during his illness many things had drifted along in the Society by no means in accordance with the highest theosophical standards. But when I bade goodbye to that wonderful character and looked into his bright, kindly eyes — I never saw a pair like them — I had renewed life. I was then under the care of physicians who declared I never would live to reach home and, traveling on the cars from town to town, it was daily expected that I would die. It may be very hard to believe it, but I recovered my health although I had been condemned by three of the best physicians in London and two in New York to die from Bright's disease. No great magic was performed, and I did not become well the very next day. But physically and mentally I was so aroused that I steadily improved. My whole nature was alert, so that it was impossible for me to give way. And here I am still active, thirty years later!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2015

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