Earthquake

wil

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Heard ya got a little bit shook up over there last night, er tomorrow or early this morning.

Anywho, I'm about to hit the hay, and noticed England got a quake.

Any of ya feel it?

4.7 ya lay in bed and watch the water on the nightstand wiggle and the chandelier sway...quite fun usually, minor damage.
 
Earthquake hits much of England the earth moved for me at 1 in the morning :) i was woke up with the whole house shaking , i thought that the central heating was playing up again, but it seems that it was an earthquake .
 
You know I thought that was my mind saying "You've had your fill for now.. Ease up." Haha, no I didn't really notice... I hope it isn't too destructive... I really hope that they come out of this with as minimal causalities as possible! My thoughts to the people there...
 
Well done how you stuck those two together, make sure you put enough sticky tape around them though Wil, they may not hold else!

I think the reason Mee put Earthquakes in the Christian thread, is to show the revelations.... ?
 
I think the reason Mee put Earthquakes in the Christian thread, is to show the revelations.... ?



or even what Jesus mentioned , along with the other signs of the times . He said that the times we live in there would be
earthquakes in one place after another.

but other countries have earthquakes that bring much more distress to people . England so far does not suffer much we only have minor ones but it was scary :eek:
 
In the 6 years I lived in Greece I experienced a lot of earthquakes that size and bigger. They are exhilarating, good fun, a natural high!! I miss em.
 
In the 6 years I lived in Greece I experienced a lot of earthquakes that size and bigger. They are exhilarating, good fun, a natural high!! I miss em.
I was born and raised until about age 13 a couple of miles outside of shaky town (Los Angeles, California). I've been through more quakes than I care to remember. The last adjectives that come to my mind in describing earthquakes are things like exhilarating, fun or natural high.

Perhaps because I remember things like fallen overpasses crushing vehicles, or the traffic cop motorcycle plummeting off the end of a fallen overpass into the early morning darkness and a forty foot drop. Or the children's hospital collapsing, and finding only a dog and a janitor alive days later buried in what had been the basement. Or the two level freeway that collapsed crushing rush hour commuters, and the little boy who had to have a field amputation just to rescue him from the immanent collapse (and the brave rescuers who risked their own lives to save him). Or the two cars, motorhome and tractor-trailer (18 wheel lorry) stranded high on an overpass when the highway in front and behind collapsed.

I do *not* miss earthquakes in the least. That is the primary reason I left the state of California, and have no desire to return for any length of time beyond a brief visit with family that chooses still to live there. I'll take a hurricane like Katrina and a week's advance notice over a 6 magnitude quake that strikes without warning any day.

Earthquakes are not fun, at all. I don't think anybody who has lost a family member or friend, pet or home to one would think so either.
 
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...I do *not* miss earthquakes in the least. That is the primary reason I left the state of California, and have no desire to return ..Earthquakes are not fun, at all. I don't think anybody who has lost a family member or friend, pet or home to one would think so either.
Namaste juan,

I understand and empathize with your concern. I am not belittling the damage from a large quake. But tremors in the 4's and below don't even compare to a child's carnival ride. I've never been in 'the big one' but in some big ones where death and property damage did occur, I've also been in hurricanes and I'll take the earthquakes.

Potential major earthquake is one of the reasons I'd rather NOT be on the east coast. The west slips regularly and consistently alleviating the pressure, the east slips rarely and doesn't make the multitude of minor corrections and we are currently awaiting the 'big one'. As I remember it the last big one was around a hundred and fifty years ago and is expected any time. The last one was in Missouri, rang church bells in Boston, and a four foot wave of earth rolled across the plains leveling everything in its path.

Of course today with our increased population and cities affected, the result will be quite different, and there won't be a quake in California that can compare.
 
Of course today with our increased population and cities affected, the result will be quite different, and there won't be a quake in California that can compare.
That's fine, to each their own.

I agree about the New Madrid fault. It made it into the news a few years back when some seismologist predicted it would slip again...and didn't, which means the pressure is still building.

However, about California, a little closer inspection of the San Andreas fault, in concert with plate tectonics, will reveal a thousand mile long fingernail sliver barely clinging to the continent and looking for an excuse to plunge into the Pacific. Add to this an undertanding of the Pacific "ring of fire" and that the west coast of California has very little continental shelf off the coast, and that mile high tidal wave Robin Williams joked about years ago doesn't seem so funny anymore.

BTW, Yellowstone is a huge volcanic cauldron. Underneath the midwest corn belt is an immense cavern that *used to* contain ground water.

Aside from hurricanes, the gulf coast is probably the most environmentally stable in the nation. We've only had one minor quake in the twenty years I've lived here, and it was centered out in the Gulf. Most people didn't even notice when it hit (but I sure did!). We just put up with the all too frequent sink hole, some of which are large enough to swallow a car or house. Local history says there used to be a huge lake around here that stretched for miles, even had steamship service from town to town, until a sinkhole opened up sometime in the late 1800's and the lake drained within 48 hours, leaving ships stranded and creating a huge fish kill. We know the area today as Payne's Prairie.

Paynes Prairie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
wow, that is so interesting. and scary. I think Ill stay over here. where Iam, we had scares about cyclones etc , even tidal surges or tsunamis. but fortuanately we have Fraser Island infront, so if we get a Tsunami, chances are the island will take the brunt of it. (i hope). cyclones etc are just a fact that old mother nature throws at us from time to time. the "experts " say we a re due for a big one. They say that every year. I hope they are wrong. Last year a couple crossed further up from us, flattenend everything. My house is over 100yr old so I guess she has stood up to them before.
 
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