Halos

greymare

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,141
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Location
Maryland. usa. FINALLY! LOL
I was wondering and I apologise if this topic has already been discussed, where did Halos come from. What I mean to say is, Is the Halo just an artistic impression so that the viewer understands that this is a "Holy" person? Also, Is it (the halo) limited to certain religions and not others. I would love to hear your opinion:)
 
I was wondering and I apologise if this topic has already been discussed, where did Halos come from. What I mean to say is, Is the Halo just an artistic impression so that the viewer understands that this is a "Holy" person? Also, Is it (the halo) limited to certain religions and not others. I would love to hear your opinion:)
Auras, perhaps?
 
I was wondering and I apologise if this topic has already been discussed, where did Halos come from. What I mean to say is, Is the Halo just an artistic impression so that the viewer understands that this is a "Holy" person? Also, Is it (the halo) limited to certain religions and not others. I would love to hear your opinion:)

As we talked about a while ago, art can come in many styles and tastes so the halo can represent something different to a group of people if asked their opinion, I think... Anyway to me the halo represents glory and perfection.

It certainly isn't a exclusive concept to one religion, if we ask simply what is a halo? The basic answer and not to get stupidly confusing... It is an icon... Icons and idols are a big, big thing in most religions if you've noticed.... The people dig it. You got the Greeks and the Romans... You got the main known Christianity and then in some Islamic images I have seen the use of the circle... Oh and Buddhists use it :D Certain there are images of a circle on hindu gods... (some one wanna confirm lol) OH! Thought of another Sun god Ra!!! *bows* :)

Whic in effect goes again to strongly show we all come from the same religion... Just chopped and changed and switched and replaced and renamed a few thangs here and there along the way.... :) And we're all right and we know it! :)
 
Don't really know, but my guess is that it arose independently in various traditions.

Would make sense to me-

The circle, for many, is symbolic of wholeness, oneness.

Light is generally seen as divinity or divine inspiration (the Holy Spirit comes as tongues of fire, the Celtic shaman has "fire in the head," the awen in Druidry is three rays of light, etc.).

Auras in symbolic form works too. If I remember correctly, I've read quite a few people who say those they feel are enlightened or connected with the divine to a great degree have a white aura.
 
The halo or nimbus is a device used in art by the Egyptians, Syrians and Romans long before Christianity.

In all cases the halo (circle of light) or nimbus (rays of light) signified identification with the sun god.

The halo was used in images of deceased emperors in Rome, to indicate they now dwell in the paradise of the gods. Later the device was used in representations of living emperors, to show their authority.

The halo hardly appears at all in Christian art prior to the third century — images of God, Christ, angels etc., are obviously who they are, and unadorned — the practice seems to develop when showing a scene from 'real life', Christ talking to the people or sitting on a throne, then it is used to indicate this is no ordinary person.

From the fourth century on, the practice broadened. During the Middle Ages, it took on a life of its own. Living people were shown with square halos, whilst the saints etc., were rounded.

The transfer from pagan to Christian is hardly surprising. In pagan usage, it initially inferred divine status, but by the time of Constantine it was equally used to signify an 'upright' or 'just' or 'noble' person, not necessarily a god or demigod.

Again, there are so many references to light in Scripture that it was almost inevitable that the cross-over would occur.

There is no conferring of halos in Scripture, but there is, of course, tongues of fire that descend on the disciples at Pentecost.

Thomas
 
Back
Top