Reading List

lunamoth

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Went to the library today for some new reading material. I love to buy books, but with the price and gas and all trying to not do that so much.

Anyway, picked up five books (not counting the Scooby Doo early-readers for my kindie girl):

1. Desire of the Everlasting Hills -- Thomas Cahill
2. The Soul of Christianity -- Huston Smith
3. Judas and the Gospel of Jesus -- NT Wright
4. The Scandelous Gospel of Jesus -- Peter Gomes
5. Breaking the Spell -- Daniel Dennett

#1 I don't know anything about but enjoyed reading two other books by Cahill, Abraham and How the IRish Saved Civilization.

#2 I've seen discussed around the forum. I've only read Smith's book on different religions, can't remember the name of it, but I've heard him talk and he sounds like he has an interested view on things.

#3 I've read a few book by Anglican Bishop NT Wright. He's a NT scholar and gaining a following as an apologist. His book Simply Christian is up there along with Mere Christianity.

#4 Recommened to me by a friend. Peter Gomes is some kind of religious scholar at Harvard, chair of something, and a liberal theologian. I enjoyed his popular book on the Bible, The Good Book.

#5 Have wanted to read it for a while. I wonder if it will have the same effect as when I read The Moral Animal, which created so much cognitive dissonance in me as an agnostic that it awakened my soul and set me on my spiritual travels.

I'll report back once I've actually read them.


SO, what all is on your reading lists?
 
Oh my! That's quite a list...other than some comments I've heard here and there I don't know much about any of these.

My reading list is a little complicated...
I have a shelf full already...Ok, several shelves full...most of which I have read or at least referred to and parsed through a time or two. But there are some that I bought, some years ago, and just never quite got around to actually reading. I'm in the middle of a book on engineering materials right now from that long overdue list. Others on my list include a book on Silver (how to work it), and I also have three series sets of books that my grandfather used studying engineering, one set from the '30's, one from the '40's and one from the '50's, which I expect should I ever complete would give me an overview of the development of roadway engineering at least across those decades. More importantly, it would provide a glimpse into my grandfather's brilliant mind, important to me because this is the grandfather I didn't get to spend as much quality adult time with as with my other grandfather.

Geeky subjects, holding little to do with religion or spirituality...what can I say? I go where my interests take me. Those interests have already taken me, and return me from time to time, to the Interlinear Bible, the Companion Bible, The Power of Myth, The Two Babylons, and a number of other related and peripherally related books. Those I *have* read, with zeal, and return to time and again as need requires.
 
Oh my! That's quite a list...other than some comments I've heard here and there I don't know much about any of these.

My reading list is a little complicated...
I have a shelf full already...Ok, several shelves full...most of which I have read or at least referred to and parsed through a time or two. But there are some that I bought, some years ago, and just never quite got around to actually reading. I'm in the middle of a book on engineering materials right now from that long overdue list. Others on my list include a book on Silver (how to work it), and I also have three series sets of books that my grandfather used studying engineering, one set from the '30's, one from the '40's and one from the '50's, which I expect should I ever complete would give me an overview of the development of roadway engineering at least across those decades. More importantly, it would provide a glimpse into my grandfather's brilliant mind, important to me because this is the grandfather I didn't get to spend as much quality adult time with as with my other grandfather.

Geeky subjects, holding little to do with religion or spirituality...what can I say? I go where my interests take me. Those interests have already taken me, and return me from time to time, to the Interlinear Bible, the Companion Bible, The Power of Myth, The Two Babylons, and a number of other related and peripherally related books. Those I *have* read, with zeal, and return to time and again as need requires.


That's pretty cool that you can read so in-depth in your grandfather's field J23. I never realized how broad your range of interests are. :cool:
 
That's pretty cool that you can read so in-depth in your grandfather's field J23. I never realized how broad your range of interests are. :cool:

Oh, I don't know...I think that may be one reason I have put the engineering books off for so long...a lot of it is greek to me. But I hope to get a sense of the gist. The calculus in the materials book I am reading now is over my head, but I find I can decipher the graphs reasonably well following the narrative... :D

Higher math was not a crucial skill in my worklife, so like any skill left unused it has waned over time...
 
I've tried of late to minimise my reading list. I'm re-reading some books rather than acquiring more. I think the next book I shall buy is one called Moon in a Dewdrop.

s.
 
Shelf full....shelves full....arrgghhh.

I never read the classics, I want to read the classics.

Currently in the queue...no classics.

The Toltec Way
Power v. Force
The Untold Story
Lessons in Truth
Biology of Belief



But put me on a plane and I'll be buying one of the top 10 pulp polyspyfi thrillers.
 
College student. Enough said.

One more thing: I am a volunteer with the university's "reading room" (we "read" textbooks for the students who need it, whether it is to "change font size" or prepare the text to be read by an electronic "reader" [like what the character Shannon Lake from the comic strip For Better or For Worse uses for her books/e-mails].)

Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
 
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Went to the library today for some new reading material. I love to buy books, but with the price and gas and all trying to not do that so much.

Anyway, picked up five books (not counting the Scooby Doo early-readers for my kindie girl):

1. Desire of the Everlasting Hills -- Thomas Cahill
2. The Soul of Christianity -- Huston Smith
3. Judas and the Gospel of Jesus -- NT Wright
4. The Scandelous Gospel of Jesus -- Peter Gomes
5. Breaking the Spell -- Daniel Dennett

#1 I don't know anything about but enjoyed reading two other books by Cahill, Abraham and How the IRish Saved Civilization.

#2 I've seen discussed around the forum. I've only read Smith's book on different religions, can't remember the name of it, but I've heard him talk and he sounds like he has an interested view on things.

#3 I've read a few book by Anglican Bishop NT Wright. He's a NT scholar and gaining a following as an apologist. His book Simply Christian is up there along with Mere Christianity.

#4 Recommened to me by a friend. Peter Gomes is some kind of religious scholar at Harvard, chair of something, and a liberal theologian. I enjoyed his popular book on the Bible, The Good Book.

#5 Have wanted to read it for a while. I wonder if it will have the same effect as when I read The Moral Animal, which created so much cognitive dissonance in me as an agnostic that it awakened my soul and set me on my spiritual travels.

I'll report back once I've actually read them.


SO, what all is on your reading lists?
I'd love a "book report" from you Luna re these books, (particularly Smith's). Have to admit, the past few years my reading of spiritual books has ebbed to a mere trickle. Partly due to fishing in the same pond-the types of books I've read over 30 years don't share much new to me-fairly repetitious after a certain point. Partly due to my greater preference these days for just gettin' on with it relative to what passes for my spiritual practice as opposed to reading much anymore, (but apparently the gettin' on with it doesn't preclude me yacking about it). But, yeah Wil, for me its reading tons of suspense and mystery novels.:) earl
 
Actually, the most recent books I've read-a few months ago-were "Awakening Through Love: Unveiling Your Deepest Goodness," a basic Dzogchen-oriented, (Dzogchen being a Tibetan Buddhist school), book by John Makransky-he's a Buddhist theology professor at Boston U a Catholic U.-a good one for even non-Buddhists and "Messages From the Masters." That, also a good read, is by the psychiatrist, Brian Weiss, whose written a number of New Age-ish books based on his work in past life therapy. Kinda eclectic aren't I? :) earl
 
My tastes are a little more simple *blush* My 16 yo daughter was obsessed with the Stephanie Meyer Twilight series so I grew alarmed and figured I better read them just to make sure there wasnt any funny business.. It wasnt long before I was sort of obsessed with them.. and Im not the only one my age.. My son had surgery recently and all the women in the waiting room were talking about them... not to mention my sons doctor. I thought it was funny... and I wasnt so embarrassed anymore. :)

Im one of those pleasure readers that wont read anything that betters me...lol it makes me snooze... Bible not included of course!
 
I only have time for one book at the moment, and that would be

Holy Bible
By God.

and its all true even the index and the maps LOL
 
Hi Lunamoth —

Sheesh ... I'm at a university ... how long's your arm? Seriously, our reading lists are presented as A5 booklets.

My own reading:
The Whole Christ by Emile Mersch
The Theology of the Mystical Body by Emile Mersch

The Mysteries of Christianity by Matthias Scheeben

The Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching by Irenaeus

Union and Distinction in the Thought of St Maximus the Confessor by Melchisedec Törönen

And for light relief :eek: I dip in and out of anything by M John Harrison, usually his SF novels "Light" or "Nova Swing" or any of his fantasy "Viriconium" books.

Thomas
 
I love fantasy novels.........
I have all of Katharine Kerr novels........Daggerspell, darkspell, dawnspell, A time of exile....etc. (14 in the series at present and one on the way..)
Also........ The Secret
also..........The Land of No Horizon....
Lots of Harry Potter... (yes, i am the motherly type)
Lemony Snickerts.....
Snugglepot and Cuddlepie
and a lot of different Australian Poetry..
Shawkshank redemption
Starting to undertake the "Wheel of Time " series by the late Robert Jordan.......
Also, a heap of "do it yourself" home improvment manuals.........LOL.
Oh, Orson Scott Card has attracted my attention too.......
 
Jauntoo3 said:
Higher math was not a crucial skill in my worklife, so like any skill left unused it has waned over time...
If you have a Facebook account, install the Mathway application. Its easy to use, free, and does Calculus problems. It may help when you're stuck, and I believe it gives a step by step solution. I think it does differential equations, but I haven't played with all the features.
 
ohboy, reading list!! :D

Right now I am reading Resurgence of the Real: Body, Nature, and Place in a Hypermodern World by Charlene Spretnak. This one is stretching my mind like silly putty. Just looking at the bibilography in it makes me feel small.

Before that, I finished Chellis Glendenning's My Name is Chellis and I'm in Recovery From Western Civilization.

On my list for the near future:

Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply by Vandana Shiva
World as Lover; World as Self by Joanna Macy
The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492 by Alfred Crosby
The Unsettling of America: Culture & Agriculture by Wendell Berry
 
I started Breaking the Spell, and I have to say the spell that needs to be broken so far is the sheer boredom. So far he's kind of gone on in an overly dramatic way about how it is taboo to discuss religion critically or look at it scientifically. I've heard this argument before and it always makes me wonder if people are living under rocks! What exactly have historians, anthropologists, sociologists and psychologists been doing all this time then? I gather that one of the main things he thinks needs done is to measure the efficacy of prayer and miracles and such in a scientific manner. I've never heard of anyone saying not to do such research!

Mountain out of molehills so far. I am disappointed.
 
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