Lent, tis the season

wil

UNeyeR1
Veteran Member
Messages
24,494
Reaction score
3,896
Points
108
Location
a figment of your imagination
So how does your tradition go?

Do you have lenten rituals?

In our church we don't 'give up' something for Lent only to take it back up afterward. We use lent as a spring board, sort of a second chance at some New Years Resolution, we give up something we want to put down forever.

Mostly its negative thoughts or traits. Give up gossip or jealousy or envy. Give up thinking ill of others, or whatever negative thoughts come up. Or maybe I want to work out/exercise more...I give up TV, or give up being a couch potato.

We aren't big into the fat tuesday or mardi gras concept either...lets party till like its 1999 cause tomorrow it is lent. Or fish...no big deal, maybe we'll want to eat less meat...so we give up meat three days a week with the intent to make that the new diet forever.

We've got some readings. Keep a True Lent has two readings and one bible passage a day to read and contemplate for the period...and then the church puts out a pamphlet for yet another....that keeps you plenty centered and focused...I like that.

Then I also look forward to Passover....as I then count the Omer...a jewish tradition, which has some great daily prayers and contemplation...another period of inner growth...extending lent for me...perfect.

How about you? What is your Lentin tradition?
 
Ash Wednesday services next week, and then Wednesday evening services throughout Lent. We also have soup supper and a Lent Study Program after the service for these five weeks. This year's looks great: Healing Brokenness, in our lives, communities, churches, ecosystems, world.

Many give up something that pinches a bit, something we will miss. I usually give up sugar and plan to do so again this year. It is part of the emptying process that goes with Lent. It also makes us mindful of people to go without all the time.

In addition to fasting, more prayer, more reading, more contemplation.

It is a time to empty, and to advance with Christ to the Cross.

Foot washing on Maundy Thrusday, Good Friday Service, then the Great Easter Vigil.

But, before all that, instead of Mardi Gras we do pancakes next Tuesday. :D
 
Yep ... pancakes on Tuesday ...

It's an interesting observation that Lent derives entirely from Tradition, and not from Scripture, so all those denominations who opposed Tradition, should have got rid of Lent! :eek:

It is often presented as an Apostolic Institution, but if it was, it's nature would have been clarified early on. But we have Athanasius saying "For some think they ought to fast for one day, others for two days, and others even for several, while others reckon forty hours both of day and night to their fast" in the third century, and in other writers it's not even mentioned.

Fat Tuesday got it's name then, from clearing the larder prior to a period of fasting.

+++

In our parish the emphasis is on ascesis, rather than 'giving up', so fasting rather than dumping bad habits ... but however you address it, it's about self-discipline and self denial.

There's a major emphasis on the positive too, so more time for prayer and spiritual reading (giving up tv, or the internet).

And again, if you're giving something up, why not give up judging others for a month?

Just some of the suggestions.

Thomas
 
tis the season again...

And this year instead of giving up...we are taking up a new practice.

some history I found.

LENT & HOLY WEEK
The Beginning of Lent
Ted Olsen | posted 8/08/2008 12:33PM



"What did you give up for Lent?" I had grown up in Baptist and other conservative evangelical churches, so my friend's question held no meaning. I figured it was like a second chance at a New Year's Resolution for those who had already abandoned theirs.
Even around here at the Christianity Today Inc. offices,where Christian History is based, it seems that Ash Wednesday passed with little notice. There were just as many donut trays by the coffee pots, and just as many hamburgers in the lunch room.
That's surprising, especially since Lent is one of the oldest observations on the Christian calendar. Like all Christian holy days and holidays, it has changed over the years, but its purpose has always been the same: self-examination and penitence, demonstrated by self-denial, in preparation for Easter. Early church father Irenaus of Lyons (c.130-c.200) wrote of such a season in the earliest days of the church, but back then it lasted only two or three days, not the 40 observed today.
In 325, the Council of Nicea discussed a 40-day Lenten season of fasting, but it's unclear whether its original intent was just for new Christians preparing for Baptism, but it soon encompassed the whole Church.
How exactly the churches counted those 40 days varied depending on location. In the East, one only fasted on weekdays. The western church's Lent was one week shorter, but included Saturdays. But in both places, the observance was both strict and serious. Only one meal was taken a day, near the evening. There was to be no meat, fish, or animal products eaten.
Until the 600s, Lent began on Quadragesima (Fortieth) Sunday, but Gregory the Great (c.540-604) moved it to a Wednesday, now called Ash Wednesday, to secure the exact number of 40 days in Lent—not counting Sundays, which were feast days. Gregory, who is regarded as the father of the medieval papacy, is also credited with the ceremony that gives the day its name. As Christians came to the church for forgiveness, Gregory marked their foreheads with ashes reminding them of the biblical symbol of repentance (sackcloth and ashes) and mortality: "You are dust, and to dust you will return" (Gen 3:19).
By the 800s, some Lenten practices were already becoming more relaxed. First, Christians were allowed to eat after 3 p.m. By the 1400s, it was noon. Eventually, various foods (like fish) were allowed, and in 1966 the Roman Catholic church only restricted fast days to Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. It should be noted, however, that practices in Eastern Orthodox churches are still quite strict.
Though Lent is still devoutly observed in some mainline Protestant denominations (most notably for Anglicans and Episcopalians), others hardly mention it at all. However, there seems to be potential for evangelicals to embrace the season again. Many evangelical leaders, including Bill Bright of Campus Crusade and Jerry Falwell are promoting fasting as a way to prepare for revival. For many evangelicals who see the early church as a model for how the church should be today, a revival of Lent may be the next logical step.

Our practice:

Keep a True Lent: The Unity Lenten Guide

The book we utilize for daily readings:

Keep a True Lent: Contents

My preachers kickoff:

http://www.unitycenteroflight.org/audio/2010/20100214_lesson24.m3u

Share your traditions!
 
My Church avoids "Ash Wednesday" specifically because the practice is explicitly prohibited by Christ. We are prohibited from making a public show of fasting by doing things like putting ashes on our heads. Christ explicitly prohibits this. We do fast, though--eat no animal products at all, no oils/fats or alcohol except on Saturdays and Sundays.
 
My Church avoids "Ash Wednesday" specifically because the practice is explicitly prohibited by Christ. We are prohibited from making a public show of fasting by doing things like putting ashes on our heads. Christ explicitly prohibits this. We do fast, though--eat no animal products at all, no oils/fats or alcohol except on Saturdays and Sundays.
Namaste Dogbrain,

Thank you for the response, explicitly prohibited, I take it this is about those announce their fast?

So do you not where religious emblems either? No public show?

How does the weekend make a difference?
 
Namaste Dogbrain,

Thank you for the response, explicitly prohibited, I take it this is about those announce their fast?

So do you not where religious emblems either? No public show?

How does the weekend make a difference?

While it is common for "Eastern" Orthodox Christians to wear a cross, it's usually worn under a shirt, we don't tend to have ostentatious display on a daily basis. The exceptions are for specific celebratory events, such as Pascha (Easter for most English speakers). The weekend makes a difference because Saturday is the Sabbath and Sunday is Lord's Day ("Kyriake" in Greek).
 
Thanx DB for the explanation,


Note in Lockyers...Holy days and Holidays about lent indicating also it is a time when we should 'take something up' use lent to raise in consciousness.
 
Thanx DB for the explanation,


Note in Lockyers...Holy days and Holidays about lent indicating also it is a time when we should 'take something up' use lent to raise in consciousness.

Among the Orthodox, it is presumed that practitioners will participate in almsgiving and similar acts during Lent. This has been the presumption for centuries.
 
Among the Orthodox, it is presumed that practitioners will participate in almsgiving and similar acts during Lent. This has been the presumption for centuries.
The concept presented at our church is to give up something you intend to give up for good...using Lent as the springboard to a new you...a new level of consciousness.

The Lockyer indication is as you indicated to take on or take up something, could be charitable or volunteer work....but again, not for the forty days...but to use the forty days to create a permanent change in your outlook.

Our thought is why give up meat or alcohol or chocalate if you feel it isn't beneficial (why give up something beneficial) and then just take it back up after it is over??
 
This year, I'm using it as a springboard to give up any meat that is not cage-free/free-range.

I've always found Lent to be a good reminder to be mindful- to review our habits in thought and action, our intentions, and so forth... and to commit to permanent changes, using Lent as a religiously supported time for that initial difficult step.

My Catholic co-workers were saying that they were being encouraged to also use it as a time to get new things done, and not just as a way to give certain things up.
 
'Lent' is from the Anglo-Saxon for 'Spring', so it speaks of new beginnings, rather than old endings.

Bearing in mind the end of Lent is the Resurrection and the Ascension, it should be a period of rejoicing as well as reflection and remembrance.

A sort of spiritual 'spring-cleaning'...

I'm using Lent to give up sugar, and say more prayer ... at present, the former is the tougher challenge.

Thomas
 
too wonderful for both of you!!

Awesome aspirations and so glad it is becomeing less of a pennance/suffer give up/return to thing...

As we see it today it is that 40 days in the wildnerness, but my understanding it started 40 hours of the crucifiction to resurrection and slowly grew from there...
 
too wonderful for both of you!!

Awesome aspirations and so glad it is becomeing less of a pennance/suffer give up/return to thing...

As we see it today it is that 40 days in the wildnerness, but my understanding it started 40 hours of the crucifiction to resurrection and slowly grew from there...
More like an investment in the future, which then is not a sacrifice or a suffering, but rather a hope for some good dividends or gain.

Atheletes must cleanse the body and mind and spirit in order to train to reach for the "gold", likewise lent is a time of conditioning the body, mind, spirit in order to reach for the goals God has for us to accomplish. It simply is a concerted effort to remind us to continue to do so, or an announcement for the new ones in faith to begin to do so.

Ironically, Lent's concept has a sound base in the practicality of human nature. If one continues with a behavior repeatedly for 21 days straight, the behavior becomes habit more often than not. Suffice it to gather that if one abstained from a behavior for 21 days (honestly), the behavior would go inactive, or disappear altogether.

40 days is simply icing on the new cake, or an allowance for us to reflect on what just happened (which can further cement our endeavors to percevere... ;-)

v/r

Q
 
Hi Quahom! Happy Lent!

If one continues with a behavior repeatedly for 21 days straight, the behavior becomes habit more often than not. Suffice it to gather that if one abstained from a behavior for 21 days (honestly), the behavior would go inactive, or disappear altogether.
I bloomin' hope so! Currently I have the lid of the sugar jar taped shut ... but tea and coffee still taste 'thin' to me ... :eek:

Thomas
 
Hi Quahom! Happy Lent!


I bloomin' hope so! Currently I have the lid of the sugar jar taped shut ... but tea and coffee still taste 'thin' to me ... :eek:

Thomas
Try honey for the tea, and "splenda" for the coffee. Neither are bad for you and both "thicken" the sauce... ;-)
 
My old man always said if you put sugar or milk in your coffee you really don't like coffee....

me I don't drink the stuff....and stevia rocks.
 
My old man always said if you put sugar or milk in your coffee you really don't like coffee....

me I don't drink the stuff....and stevia rocks.
I like my tea and coffee plain, personally. But then, I like my beer cold, and my whiskey on the rocks...

I have no intention of judging another's drink, however, as I don't know how it affects them... lol ;-)
 
I am finding my meat issue difficult. At home, no problem. Just buy the right kinds of meat/eggs. Dairy is impossible. Try finding free-range cheese or butter. Just try.

I'm doing the best I can. The real difficulty is having dinner with friends (at their home, etc.). It comes across as rude and pretentious if you won't eat the main part of the meal because its origins are unidentifiable.

Do I just fake being a veggie? Help! LOL
 
Back
Top